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MEMBERS MAGAZINE March 2016 - August 2016 HUNTINGTON MUSEUM OF ART H U N T I N G TO N MUSEUM OF ART 2033 McCoy Road Huntington WV 25701- 4999 1 It is that glorious time of year when everything is renewed once again. The weath- er warms up plants are revived flowers begin blooming and ... allergies catch up with us spring cleaning time arrives and the fish pond needs cleaning out ... hmm perhaps not as glorious as first thought Here at the museum things are warming up as well. In March we are starting off on a trip through the world of Haitian Art particularly of some of the more important printers and painters of that movement. A short time later a group exhibition of works by the faculty of West Virginia University will open. From paintings to sculpture and photography to video visitors will be hard pressed not to find something that provokes a reaction or introspection on their part. Portfolio where the works of high school and middle school students are fea- tured is always a hallmark of the spring and something to which both students teachers and their families look forward. Our next Gropius artist noted photog- rapher Abelardo Morell will offer up some of his wonderful work using a camera obscura and teach a workshop on its use. This June workshop will be one not to miss as it is not often that you find an artist working in the medium. This summer a great exhibit of Dutch oils from the permanent collection will take us back to the time of exploration empire and intimacy. Our big summer exhibit Earth Stories will feature truly magnificent quilts that depict interest- ing and poignant imagery concerning the Earth and the issues we struggle with as residents of our planet. We are excited to be the first West Virginia institution to present A TALENT FORGOTTEN The Art of Edith Lake Wilkinson which features important works by this Wheeling native. A bold selection of works from The Daywood Col- lection will round out the museums summer offerings. As always our fiscal year comes to a close at the end of June. So please consider renewing your membership and making a special donation to support the Hun- tington Museum of Arts many initiatives it takes all of us to continue the good work we do up on the hill Geoffrey K. Fleming Executive Director Spring has Sprung HMA Development Director Carol Bailey and HMA Executive Director Geoffrey K. Fleming pose for a photo on February 27 during the 2016 Museum Ball. The theme for the event which was presented by Ca- bell Huntington Hospital was Destination India Royal Museum Ball. Photo by John Gillispie. Our thoughts are with the family members and friends of our colleague Judy Browning Clark who passed away on February 15 2016. As HMAs Executive Assistant Judy was always kind and helpful during her nearly 15 years at the Museum and it was a pleasure to work with her. We will miss her This photo shows Judy and HMA Development Officer Tess Moore enjoying time on the Ohio River in the summer of 2015. In Memoriam Dale Burns and HMA Board of Trustees Member Cathy Burns pose for a photo with HMA Board of Trustees Treasurer Paul Jacobson at the 2016 Museum Ball. Photo by Tess Moore. For more about the 2016 Museum Ball which was presented by Cabell Hunting- ton Hospital please see Pages 21 22 and 23. 2 Board of Trustees STAFF Geoffrey K. Fleming Executive Director John Arthur Facilities Assistant Carol Bailey Director of Development Dr. Mike Beck Director of Conservatory Ruth Ann Burke Weekend Receptionist Katherine Cox Director of Education Cynthia Dearborn Museum Schools Coordinator Carol Eiselstein Museum Shop Buyer Volunteer John Farley Assistant Curator Preparator John Gillispie Director of Public Relations Christopher Hatten Senior Curator Nancy Hoey Shop Assistant Part-time Billie Marie Karnes Finance Director Kathleen Kneafsey Artist in Residence George Lanham Museum Educator Matt Matney Director of Facilities Sandy McNeer Development Database Administrator Tess Moore Development Officer Ama Napier ReceptionistAdministrator Janice Noah Weekend Shop Assistant Brian Rice Facilities Assistant Cheryl Roberts Facilities Assistant Part-time Linda Sanns Registrar Ashley Saunders Museum Shop Manager John Spurlock Curatorial Assistant John Weber Special Projects Volunteer Vision Statement The Huntington Museum of Art will become an integral part of the lives of all citizens facilitating creativity access and opportunity to the social structure of the region. Mission Statement The Huntington Museum of Art serves the public as a museum and cultural center and in the greater community acts as a presence and advocate for the areas of arts education and nature. COVER Edith Lake Wilkinson American 18681957 Apple Picking ca. 19141923. Carved woodblock 15-12 x 13-38 in. Funds provided by the Winslow Anderson Endowment Fund. INSIDE FRONT COVER Macys Presents Hilltop Books Only will take place at HMA on August 20 2016 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and August 21 2016 from noon to 5 p.m. INSIDE BACK COVER This fact sheet about HMA was created by Museum Educator G. W. Lanham and distributed at Arts Day at the Capitol on February 22 2016. BACK COVER Edith Lake Wilkinson American 18681957 View from Provincetown Hill with St. Peters Church ca. 1913-1923. Oil on canvas board 14 x 19 in. Funds provided by the Sarah Wheeler Charitable Trust in memory of Harold R. Steve Wheeler and Sarah Slack Wheeler. Monte Ward President Barbara Moses Atkins Vice President Paul Jacobson Treasurer Patricia Proctor Secretary Dr. Sarah Denman Immediate Past President Executive Committee Doris Andrews Ava G. Bicknell Jimelle Walker Bowen Andy Broh Shelia Brownfield Cathy Burns Liza Caldwell Tyson Compton Deborah Cooley Harriette Cyrus Interim Director Emeritus Alex Franklin Teresa L. Deppner Hardin Cheryl Henderson Linda Holmes Carolyn Hunter Brandi Jacobs-Jones Dr. Dolores Johnson Christie Kinsey Executive Committee Doug Korstanje Halcyon Moses Dr. Maurice Mufson Lee Oxley Executive Committee Marilyn Polan Jessica Pressman Edward Rahal Phoebe Patton Randolph Brandy Roisman Executive Committee Thomas Scarr Carter Seaton Elizabeth Appell Sheets Susan Shields Christopher Slaughter Jerry Sutphin Wendy Thomas Edward Tucker EX-OFFICIO Ed Dawson The Herald-Dispatch President Jerome Gilbert President of Marshall University William Smith Cabell County Schools Don Van Horn Marshall University College of Arts and Media EMERITUS TRUSTEES George R. Andrick Carolyn Bagby Alex E. Booth Jr. Michael Cornfeld Gayle Cox Robert Y. Csernica Interim Director Emeritus Dr. R. Lawrence Dunworth Gaye Fearing Mrs. John R. Hall R. Sterling Hall C. Don Hatfield Joyce Levy Mrs. Selden S. McNeer Jr. R. O. Robertson Jr. Dr. Thomas F. Scott Ann Speer Dr. Joseph B. Touma David Todd Joan Weisberg Executive Committee HONORARY TRUSTEES Janet Bromley Mary Hodges Gayle Manchin Free Tuesdays at HMACourtesy of Macys Tuesdays are free admission days at HMA. Our Tuesday hours are 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Free Tuesdays at HMA in 2016 are generously sponsored by Macys. 3 Here to There Since its beginnings the Huntington Museum of Art has sought to serve artists throughout the state of West Virginia by providing opportunities for exhibiting their work. Certainly one of the rich- est talent pools within the state exists in the art departments at the colleges and universities in West Virginia the largest of which is in Morgantown at West Virginia University. Here to There is an exhibition of work that showcases the award- winning faculty of West Virginia Universitys School of Art De- sign. Alison Helm Director of the School of Art Design says The exhibition is a way of symbolically connecting not only two ends of the state but also the experiences of the artists who share similar elements of place facilities technology and robust stylistic languages. We share common ground situated within the borders of this lushly inspiring state. From us to you from artists to view- ers our work is about diversity of communication visual phrasing systems of materiality artificial landscapes reproduction and em- ploying a wide variety of aesthetics with a willingness to take risks. Fourteen artists will exhibit work in a wide range of materials and formats from painting and ceramics to electronic media. The faculty who will participate include Dylan Collins Sculpture Eve Faulkes Graphic Design Joseph Galbreath Graphic Design Gerald Habarth Electronic Media Alison Helm Sculpture Jason Lee FoundationsSculpture Joseph Lupo Printmaking Robert Boomer Moore Ceramics Jeffrey Moser Interactive Media Design Kofi Opoku Graphic Design Shoji Stake Ce- ramics Amy Schissel Painting Michael Sherwin Photography and Naijun Zhang Painting. An illustrated catalog will accom- pany the exhibition. We are grateful to our funders the Colonel Eugene E. Myers Foundations and the Dr. Hubert E. Traude E. Martin Endowment who have made this exhibition and publica- tion a reality Helm said. This exhibit is part of HMAs ongoing efforts to highlight the work of West Virginia artists and follows The Art of Teaching Art Marshall University Visual Art Faculty Show which ran at HMA from Nov. 23 2013 through Feb. 2 2014 Daywood Gallery March 19-June 12 2016 Opening Reception will take place on March 19 2016 from 6 to 8 p.m. Admission to this event is free. Presented with support from The Colonel Eugene E. Myers Foundations and The Dr. Hubert E. Traude E. Martin Endowment. Gold Mountaineer Sponsor for this exhibit is Medical Practice Management Solutions. This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History and the National Endowment for the Arts with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts. Alison Helm Spectral Interaction 2015. Painted wood bismuth cast resin stainless steel 3 x3 x 15. Image courtesy of the artist. An Exhibition of Work by West Virginia University School of Art Design Faculty 4 Earth Stories Art has long served as a voice to express concern over issues that affect human so- ciety. Certainly one of the most pressing prob- lems that confronts the current genera- tion is the long-term health of the planet. Answers to the challenges presented by overpopulation endangered wildlife costly sources of energy air and water pollution climate change diminishing farmland and deforestation are sought by a host of organizations and individuals. Studio Art Quilt Associates an organi- zation that exists to promote art quilts and the artists who make them issued a call for artists to submit proposals for works that would highlight a person or group that is working to improve the Earth. Entries were received from the United States Europe and the Middle East. Juror Dr. Carolyn Mazloomi a decorated quilt artist herself selected a group of 24 proposals based on compel- ling themes as well as the technical and artistic skills demonstrated in the artists portfolios. I looked for work that would emotionally draw me in ... pieces with the distinctive voice of the artist coming through which would be memorable and move my spirit Mazloomi said. The resulting works touch upon a variety of themes and the ini- tiatives that are underway by a number of organizations and in- dividuals to address some of the planets problems. Community projects such as The Tenderloin Peoples Garden in San Francisco the seismic-resistant housing efforts of Architecture for Humanity and the housing preservation group Haushaltenin Leipzig Ger- many inspired works that showcased the push to promote urban sustainability. Artists Regina V. Benson Cynthia St. Charles and Jennifer Day chose to focus on the growing effort to harness renewable energy while Nancy Cook Annie Helmericks-Louder Alicia Merrett Leni Levenson Wiener Mary Pal and Noriko Endo all created quilts that turn the spotlight on preserving the rich variety of wild- life on the Earth. Other works look at projects that are attempting to improve the health of our forests and waterways as well as efforts that address overpopulation and sustainable agriculture. The rich and colorful quilts that resulted from this project are not only strikingly beautiful in their own right but they serve the purpose of focusing attention upon the worldwide struggle to protect and preserve our planet. In conjunction with Earth Stories a group of quilts from the Hun- tington Museum of Arts permanent collection will be on display in the Print Gallery wing of the Daywood Gallery. Daywood Gallery June 25 - October 2 2016 Opening reception takes place during the July Tuesday Tour on July 26 2016 at 7 p.m. Admission to this Macys Free Tuesday event is free. This is a detail of a work titled African Farmers by Jean Herman featured in the exhibit Earth Stories. 5 Earth Stories Presented with support from Dr. Leslie Petteys and William Skip Campbell This exhibit is supported by Robert Angel In Memory of Mary Collins Chaney Jan and Dennis Bills In Memory of Their Parents Adam Joseph Booth In Memory of Jeanne Kaplan Dunn Marian F. Crowe In Memory of Eugene R. Crowe John Gillispie and Patty Gillispie In Memory of Lorri Tipton Nancy Hoey In Memory of Charlotte and Albert Boos Mr. and Mrs. Timothy R. Kinsey In Honor of Mrs. Rae Mitchell Mark Tobin Moore and Donna Jean Whitten In Memory of Henry C. Keeling Emeritus Professor University of Charleston David and Janet Perdue In Memory of Mary Lycans Asbury Ruth C. Sullivan In Honor of Joseph Sullivan and Susan Weinstein In Memory of Mary Etta Hight This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History and the National Endowment for the Arts with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts. This is a detail of a work titled Woodland by Noriko Endo featured in the Earth Stories exhibit. 6 The small country of the Netherlands has pro- duced a remarkable number of artists whose fame and influence have spread far beyond their native land. A robust artistic tradition that made paint- ings and prints widely available to the Dutch citi- zenry rather than only the wealthy or the politically powerful offered an environment that supported a thriving culture for professional artists. A selec- tion of objects from the Huntington Museum of Art collection will highlight the work of a number of Dutch artists ranging from a group of etchings by Rembrandt and early natural history prints to paintings by members of The Hague School whose rural subjects echoed those of the Barbizon School in France. In addition to being the premier painter of the Dutch Golden Age Rembrandts prolific and mas- terful work in the etching medium had a profound effect upon generations of artists that followed him. The Huntington Museum of Art owns three etchings by Rembrandt a pair of religious scenes and a portrait of Jan Lutma a goldsmith from Amsterdam. Two other 17th century painters Ge- rard Dou and Caspar Netscher are represented by paintings that show the range of subject matter that would have been offered in Holland at the time both formal portraits of the rich and famous and the everyday subject matter that became a staple of Dutch genre paintings. As European explorers sailed to new and exotic locations naturalists began to record information and images about the plants and animals they en- countered on these journeys. A wealth of infor- mation on these subjects was disseminated in a number of books that were sumptuously illustrated by artists such as Maria Sibylla Merian a German- born artist who later relocated to Amsterdam where she prospered as a botanical illustrator an unusual feat for a woman of her time. By the latter portion of the 19th century a thriving group of Dutch artists pictured the rural agricultural landscape and humble peas- ant subjects of their native land in a manner that was much like the work of French painters such as Corot and Millet. Known col- lectively as The Hague School painters such as Josef Israels and Anton Mauve depicted the Dutch countryside and its inhabitants infusing their works with a subdued tonal range and emphasis on the mood created by the gray skies that so often characterize the Netherlandish atmosphere. Dutch Treat Paintings and Prints from the Netherlands Bridge Gallery July 31 to October 16 2016 This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History and the National Endowment for the Arts with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts. Evert Pieters Dutch 1856-1932 Interior With Mother and Child. Oil on canvas 30 x 25 in. Gift of Herbert Fitzpatrick 1952.439. 7 A Talent Forgotten The Art of Edith Lake Wilkinson The story of the life of the American artist Edith Lake Wilkinson is one of tragedy and triumph while the latter would not come un- til years after her demise. The story of her life career and eventual commitment could in many respects have been easily lost. But who was this woman artist from West Vir- ginia And why is her story so compelling Edith Lake Wilkinson was born in Wheeling West Virginia on August 23 1868. Upon her graduation from the Union School in 1887 she like her mother before her decided to study art enrolling in classes at the Art Stu- dents League located in New York City. She remained at the league though 1891 where she studied with a number of American painters who would become some of the best regarded of the period including James Car- roll Beckwith William Merritt and Kenyon Cox. Wilkinson eventually began to travel regu- larly to the growing art colony located in Provincetown Massachusetts. Here among many other young American artists includ- ing fellow West Virginian Blanche Lazzell she thrived and honed her impressionistic technique. It was during her time there that she found herself at the forefront of the development of what has become known today as the white line woodblock print a curi- ously American print form developed by the artist and teacher B.J.O. Nordfeldt. From 1913 through 1923 she would be a fixture during the summer months in the small fishing village along with her partner Fannie Wilkinson. Following the accidental death of her parents in 1922 Edith Lake Wilkinson increasingly fell under the control of the attorney han- dling their substantial estate George Jackson Rogers. Based in her hometown and unbeknownst to all he was stealing from the very people whose money he was supposed to look after. To take con- trol of Wilkinsons money he had her committed to an asylum in Baltimore. Later she was moved to Huntington where she re- mained for decades. Edith Lake Wilkinson never left the state hospital in Huntington. Deprived of her ability to create art she died there in 1957 having spent over three decades trapped in a world that she did not be- long. Years later her artwork found packed away in a trunk in the family home in Wheeling was discovered and created a renewed interest in her life and career. Today the Huntington Museum of Art is very pleased to be the first art museum in West Virginia to not only own original wood printing blocks by her but also to fea- ture a substantial exhibition of her paintings drawings and prints to the public. This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History and the National Endowment for the Arts with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts. Edith Lake Wilkinson American born 1868 Wheeling West Virginia died 1957 Huntington West Virginia Barn carved wood block 1921 11-12 x 14 in. Funds provided by the Winslow Anderson Endowment Fund. Gallery 3 July 2 September 18 2016 Opening reception takes place on Sunday July 17 2016 from 2 to 4 p.m. Admission is free. HMA plans to show the documentary film about the artist titled Packed in a Trunk The Lost Art of Edith Lake Wilkinson on August 23 2016 during the August Tuesday Tour. Admission to this Macys Free Tuesday event is free. Presented with support from Dr. Leslie Petteys William Skip Campbell Louise Lake Polan Margaret Mary Layne in Honor of Jamez Morris-Smith and Samuel Kincaid 8 Marshall University College of Arts and Media Presents Portfolio 2016 This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History and the National Endowment for the Arts with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts. Switzer Gallery April 2- May 8 2016 Opening reception and awards ceremony will take place April 2 2016 at 2 p.m. Marshall University College of Arts and Media Presents Portfolio 2016 is an exhibit of work cre- ated by middle school and high school students from the Tri-State Area. This exhibit celebrates the hard work accomplished by teachers and stu- dents. Each middle school teacher selects four works of art from their classes and each high school teacher selects six. What a challenging task for the teachers Typically HMA exhibits about 200 works in the Portfolio exhibit. A faculty member from the MU College of Arts and Media views all entries and identifies the award winners distributing 500 to selected students. Portfolio 2016 is presented by the Marshall University College of Arts and Media. Shown are some of the entries in last years student art exhibit. Visitors enjoy the opening reception for last years Studio Selec- tions exhibit. Studio Selections May 17-June 26 2016 Virginia Van Zandt Great Hall Opening reception will take place on May 17 at 6 p.m. Studio Selections is an exhibition celebrating the accomplishments of people who have participated in HMAs studio program during the year. Classes in watercolor painting photography clay and drawing are very popular at the Museum. Be sure to come and enjoy this ex- hibit and see what goes on in HMAs studio program. Painters from HMAs watercolor class pose for a photo. This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History and the National Endowment for the Arts with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts. 9 Macys Presents Haitian Art from the Permanent Collection Water Water Everywhere Paean to a Vanishing Resource Gallery 3 Continues through June 19 2016 This exhibition is comprised of 30-second to 30-minute films from 41 artists worldwide exploring water issues from the political to the personal and from ethics to aesthetics with works that are docu- mentary experimental educational humorous solemn animated or acted. The exhibition is curated by Jennifer Heath an independent scholar award-winning cultural journalist critic curator and ac- tivist. Her many exhibitions include The Veil Visible Invisible Spaces and The Art We Love to Hate Black Velvet. She is the author of nine books of fiction and non-fiction including Land of the Unconquerable The Lives of Contemporary Afghan Women from the University of California Press. This exhibit is a project of Baksun Books Arts. For more information on this exhibit visit www.waterwatereverywhere-artshow.com This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History and the National Endowment for the Arts with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts. Special Thanks to the members of HMAs NXTGEN Committee who helped in the planning for this exhibit. The September 2015 Opening Reception for this Exhibit was Generously Sponsored by the Marshall University College of Science in Memory of Shelba Glenn Pew. Bridge Gallery March 12-July 17 2016 Please join us on March 22 2016 at 7 p.m. for the March Tuesday Tour when this exhibit will be in the spotlight. Refreshments will be served. This is a Macys Free Tuesday event. The rich and colorful work produced by self-taught artists in Haiti forms an important segment of the permanent collec- tion at the Huntington Museum of Art. Most of the works were gifts of Winslow Anderson a for- mer designer at Blenko Glass who began visiting Haiti in the late 1940s and acquiring works of art while there. There will also be a selection of recent acquisitions that have been purchased with income provided by the Winslow Anderson Endowment Fund. This exhibit is presented by Macys. This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History and the National Endowment for the Arts with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts. Debacle des Cacos le 1961915 A Disaster for the Caco Guerillas on 19 June 1915 Philom Obin Haitian 1892 - 1986 ca. 1947. Oil on cardboard image 20 x 24 in. 50.8 x 61 cm framed 26 x 30 in. 66 x 76.2 cm. Funds provided by the Winslow Anderson Endowment Fund. Asa Maria Bengtsson and Ewa Cederstam Still from Flow 2006. Video. Sound 1406. This is from the exhibit Water Water Everywhere Paean to a Vanishing Resource which was curated by Jennifer Heath and is a project of Baksun Books Arts. 10 New Acquisitions Jim Cantrell American b. 1935 Escalation II 1984 oil on canvas 48 x 42 in. Gift of Sean Cantrell. Henri de Beul Belgian 1845-1900 A Shepherd Tending his Flock 1893. Oil on canvas painting 34 x 52 in. framed 53 x 70-12 in. Gift of anonymous donors. Lockwood de Forest American 1850-1932 five brass filigree panels designed by Lockwood de Forest and made at his work- shop in Ahmedabad India ca. 1886 Five Daisies with Spiky Leaves Circular Peacock Two Peacocks 1 Holly Bush 2 Figure with Fan 2. 6-34 x 7-12 in. 5 x 5 in. 3-34 x 7 in. 6-14 x 4 in. 10-12 x 5 in. Gift of Sullivan Goss An American Gallery. Levi North American 1821-1901 Thomas J. Stone ca. 1843-1847. Pencil drawing on paper 3-34 x 3-18 in. Gift of Geoffrey K. Fleming. Leslie Shiels American b. 1950 La Pomme et LOiseau 2015 oil on linen 30 x 30. Gift of Dr. Douglas and Diane Dix in honor of her mother Judy Booth. Punch Set H. C. Fry and Co. Rochester Pennsylvania about 1900 Frederick pattern colorless cut glass punch bowl on stand 11-14 x 12 in. 12 cups 2-12 x 4-12 x 3 in. each. Gift of the Alexander Brast Thomas and Carol Thomas Trust. Gifts Purchases William Brouillard American Machine Age Fish Plat- ter 2010 wheel-thrown and altered red earthenware with majolica-style glazing 26 x 26 x 2 in. Museum purchase. Lockwood de Forest American 1850-1932 Three Feluc- cas Vibrant Sunset on the Nile 1876 oil on card 7 x 9-12 in. framed 11-14 x 13-34 in. Funds provided by the Sarah Wheeler Charitable Trust in memory of Harold R. Steve Wheeler and Sarah Slack Wheeler. Daniel Kaufmann American Superfund Site Valley Forge 2014 archival pigment print 20 x 50 in. Funds provided by John Weber. Harvey Gregory Prusheck American b. Yugoslavia 1887- 1940 Flood in Ohio Valley 1937 oil on canvas 45 x 41 in. Museum purchase. Attributed to Ferdinand Richardt American b. Denmark 1819-1895 Harpers Ferry Virginia ca. 1855-1859 oil on canvas unsigned framed 12 x 15 in. Museum purchase. Elise Schweitzer American Skydiver 2 Page 2015 oil on linen 48 x 66 in. Purchase Award from Exhibition 280. Joseph Henry Sharp American 1859-1953 In the Studio 1897 oil on canvas 32-34 x 22-14 in. Funds provided by the Winslow Anderson Endowment Fund. Jeffrey Sippel American born 1952 Champagne monotype plate 10 x 8 in. framed 22 x 18 in. Museum purchase. Edith Lake Wilkinson American born 1868 Wheeling West Virginia died 1957 Huntington West Virginia Apple Picking carved wood block ca. 1914-1923 15-12 x 13-38 in. and Barn carved wood block 1921 11-12 x 14 in. Funds provided by the Winslow Anderson Endowment Fund. Lockwood de Forest American 1850-1932 Three Feluccas Vibrant Sunset on the Nile 1876 oil on card 7 x 9-12 in. framed 11-14 x 13-34 in. Funds provided by the Sarah Wheeler Charitable Trust in memory of Harold R. Steve Wheeler and Sarah Slack Wheeler. Jeffrey Sippel American born 1952 Champagne monotype plate 10 x 8 in. framed 22 x 18 in. Museum purchase. 11 This self-portrait and lovely handwritten note were left on the back of a Museum visitor survey card by a 21-year-old first-time Museum guest from Zanesville Ohio. The opening reception for The Herald-Dispatch Presents WHAAM Original Comic Drawings from the Collection on July 28 2015 was well attended by people of different generations. This was a Macys Free Tuesday event. The exhibit was dedicated in memory of Alfred Lee Reynolds. HMA by the Numbers From July to December more than 200 visitors to the Hun- tington Museum of Art completed visitor surveys. Of those 137 were first-time visitors to the Museum. They came from 11 cities in West Virginia and 21 different states from Vermont to Texas. Our visitors ranged in age from 9 to 89 with the average age being 40 and of the 95 responses submitted rating their overall experience at HMA 81 said the museum was excellent. The Following comments were hand-written on the backs of Museum visitor survey cards by a few of our guests Happy Go Lucky Greeter. Knows a lot Couldnt have imagined a better experience Thank you for this Surprise delight Hand blown glass in the conservatory. Paintings. Nice variety and well-lit galleries. 12 WalterGropius Master Artist Series Presents Abelardo Morell Exhibition March 5 - June 26 2016 Public Presentation June 16 2016 at 7 p.m. The Camera Obscura Workshop will take place June 17-19 2016 This workshop will involve students in converting various rooms at the Museum into camera obscuras. Participants will work with Abe Morell in scouting and locating suitable rooms and views. They will also be involved in the entire production of the camera obscura process. Students will be given the opportunity to create their own imagery in these darkened interiors as individuals or as small groups. They will also be challenged to make changes in the outside landscape to make the projections inside more meaningful and interesting. These activities can include setting up performances and installations to affect the outside views. About the Artist Abelardo Morell was born in Havana Cuba in 1948. In 1962 at the height of the Cold War he immigrated to the United States with his parents. Morell received his undergraduate degree in 1977 from Bowdoin College and an MFA from The Yale University School of Art in 1981. In 1997 he received an honorary degree from Bowdoin College. He has received a number of awards and grants including a Gug- genheim fellowship in 1994 a Rappaport Prize in 2006 and he was the recipient of the International Center of Photographys Infinity Award in Art in 2011. His work has been collected and shown in many prestigious institutions including the Museum of Modern Art the Metropolitan Art Museum in New York The Chicago Art Institute The Boston Museum of Fine Art and more than 70 other museums in the United States and abroad. His publications include a photographic illustration of Alices Adventures in Wonder- land 1998 by Dutton Childrens Books Camera Obscura 2004 by Bulfinch Press and a limited edition book by The Museum of Modern Art in New York of his Clich Verre images with a text by Oliver Sacks. He lives with his wife Lisa McElaney a filmmaker and his chil- dren Brady and Laura in Brookline Massachusetts. About the Artists Work Abelardo Morells images offer clever post-modern commentary on the nature of photography by referencing the mediums beginnings while simultaneously celebrating the ephemeral magic of light and shadow. He is best known for using a camera obscura an optical de- vice that preceded photography and the photographic camera to create images that marry interior and exterior spaces in unexpected ways. Morrell also employs clich verre a technique of reproducing images in which a glass plate coated with collodion is etched and photographed against a black background and photograms pic- tures produced with photographic materials such as light-sensitive paper but without a camera in his work. Abelardo Morell View of Hotel de Ville Paris 2015. Digital Print using Camera Obscura. Image courtesy of the artist. 13 WalterGropius Master Artist Series Presents Brooke Atherton Exhibition July 9 - September 11 2016 Public Presentation September 8 2016 at 7 p.m. Workshop titled Crossing Media Art of the Mix will take place September 9-11 2016 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. This workshop will focus on the stories you tell and how you tell them you will layer collage and stitch a book or wall hanging your choice that is a record of our explorations in adding color texture and meaning to fabric paper and found objects. About the Artist Brooke Atherton is a nationally recognized textile artist whose art quilts and mixed media works build community and tell stories. Atherton grew up in Ohio and earned a BFA from Wright State University Dayton Ohio. She decided she needed more real life not more theory and embarked on a search for knowledge and ex- perience in the years that followed she worked as a video and per- formance artist and was the artist-in-residence at an archaeological site. Atherton settled in Billings MT fifteen years ago where she works in an Arts in Medicine program at Billings Clinic Cancer Center. Atherton also taught at the Montana Womens Prison as well as the Yellowstone Art Museum and has organized several community art projects in Billings. Her work has been exhibited in museums galleries and fiber art shows in the United States and England including Quilt Visions in San Diego. She is the Montana and Idaho representative for Studio Art Quilt Associates and has exhibited in several traveling SAQA shows. About the Artists Work Athertons art quilts are built up in layers of silk cotton and wool from canvas backings. She manipulates the fabric by ripping burn- ing and rusting these non-traditional methods represent the ef- fects of elemental forces such as fire and water which she then fuses and stitches extensively. Atherton collects artifacts on walks about town and camping trips in the mountains which she incor- porates into her fiber art. Her art is a visual record of her life and journey across the North American West. Many works function as intimate personal libraries calendars maps and measuring devices that relate to specific stories and events with underlying themes of passage through time and space and meaning built through repeti- tion. She also draws inspiration from the journals of the Lewis and Clark expedition and Victorian daybook ledgers. Brooke Atherton SpringField 2012. Hand dyed silk cotton and found objects on canvas 32H x 97W. Quilt National Best of Show 2013. Private collection. Photo credit Gary J. Kirksey Larry Hamel-Lambert. Brooke Atherton Twenty Feet Deep Detail 2006. Fiber mixed media on canvas 17W x 258H. Photo credit Photographic Solutions Billings MT 14 WalterGropius Master Artist Series Presents Patrick Lee The Huntington Museum of Art will welcome Patrick Lee as a Walter Gropius Master Artist in October 2016. An exhibit of work by Lee will go on view at HMA on September 24 2016 and continue through December 23. The artist will speak at HMA about his work on October 13 2016 at 7 p.m. Admission to this public presentation is free. Refreshments will be served. Lee will facilitate a three-day drawing workshop at HMA on October 14-16 2016. For workshop fee information please see the information box at the bottom of this page. Please see the next issue of HMAs Members Magazine for more about Patrick Lees accom- plishments. Patrick Lee Deadly Friends Union Station 2009. Graphite on paper. Image Courtesy of the Artist. Photo credit Tony Cunha Patrick Lee Deadly Friends Knuckles 2013. Graphite on paper. Image Courtesy of the Artist. Photo credit Joshua White Walter Gropius Masters Workshops The Walter Gropius Master Artist Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gro- pius who designed the Museums Gropius Addition as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booths son Alex Booth for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Art- ists Workshops. Workshop fees Workshop fee per person per workshop is 325 for non- members 275 for Museum Members 250 for teachers 200 for students. Meet-and-greet first-day breakfast and daily lunch included in the workshop fee. The number of workshop participants is limited. How to enroll Registration must be received at least 3 days in advance of the class starting date. All checks should be made to the Huntington Museum of Art. Most major credit cards are accepted by fax phone mail or in person or register online. Send payment to Huntington Museum of Art Education Classes 2033 McCoy Road Huntington WV 25701. For more information visit www.hmoa.org or call 304 529-2701. HMA is fully accessible. 15 HMA Helping Contribute to Empty Bowls Event on April 15 People gathered to enjoy a day of making bowls for a good cause on February 6 in HMAs Studio 4. Empty Bowls is a grass-roots movement that helps fight hunger. HMA provided clay for artists to create bowls to donate to this worthy program. All bowls were wheel thrown with finished bottoms no trimming. HMA has been helping contribute bowls to the program for many years. The Empty Bowls event will take place at First Presbyterian Church on April 15 beginning at 1030 a.m. Participants make bowls at HMA for the upcoming Empty Bowls event in downtown Huntington in April. Tri-State Arts Association June 4-July 10 2016 Switzer Gallery Opening reception takes place on Sunday June 5 2016 from 2 to 4 p.m. Since the 1950s HMA has served as the venue for the Tri-State Arts Association Biennial Exhibition featuring work by artists from West Virginia Kentucky and Ohio. The group meets at HMA on the second Thursday of every OTHER month in Feb- ruary April June August October and December at 630 p.m. in Studio One. For more information visit the groups website at www.tristatearts.webs.com. This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History and the National Endowment for the Arts with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts. Save The Date THE HUNTINGTON MUSEUM OF ARTS ANNUAL Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon April 18 2016 1130-100 H U N T I N G T O N MUSEUM OF ART 16 Getting to Know Printmaking Saturdays March 5-April 9 1-3 p.m. Finally a chance to learn about all of the printmaking terms and processes and how to use the press This six-session workshop will week by week clarify and simplify print- making. Each session will feature one particular process presented by an artist who is a master. The sessions will be mostly demonstra- tion with a little hands-on. Participants may register and attend any or all sessions. Cost is 20 per session or 100 for all six for Museum Members 120 for non-Members. March 5 PRINTING AND TRANSFER TECHNIQUES ON CANVAS OVERSIZED PAPER with Peter Massing Hayson Harrison March 12 USING THE PRESS TO REGISTER AND PRINT MULTI- PLE COLORS with John Spurlock March 19 MONOPRINTING with Samantha Belcher March 26 COLLOGRAPHS with Paula Clendenin April 2 INTAGLIO with Benjy Davies April 9 RELIEF PRINTING with Mary Grassell Printmaking at HMA There is an entire world of teeming activ- ity that takes place in HMAs studios. In case you didnt know there are five pro- fessional studios separate from the main building located behind the museum. The setting is idyllic. Behind each studio is a view of the woods with all of the ac- companying wildlife to enjoy. Central to each of the five studio entrances is an open grassy courtyard area with trees and benches. While this common area is cozy and intimate encircled by the museum buildings it is also expansive being open to the sky. This is a perfect setting for cre- ativity. Creativity is within everyones reach no exceptions. If you are interested in learning exploring and experimenting then you are a candidate for a creative experience in HMAs studio program. If you are curious and inquisitive then come participate in a class or workshop. If youre feeling daring and dont mind taking some risks and mak- ing some messes then come try your hand at some art making. This spring we are offering along with our ever-popular clay watercolor painting and photography some classes and workshops in a new and different format for easier ac- cess to people with busy schedules. Printmaking is shown in HMAs Studio 5. 17 All About Clay All About Clay Saturdays April 16 May 21 1-3 p.m. This is your chance to find out how clay artists in our area are getting some of their amazing results. During this six-session workshop participants will learn about varieties of clay processes. Each session will feature one process or method presented by a clay artist who is a master. The sessions will be mostly demonstration with a little hands-on. Participants may register and attend any or all sessions. Register ahead for all six or pay when you show up each time. Cost is 20 per session or 100 for all six for Museum Members or 120 for all six for non-Members. April 16 SIMPLIFIED ELEGANCE with Sarah Olsen Enjoy learning a historic Japanese tradi- tion mishima and let Sarah put a mod- ern twist on it for you. We will explore incised line work and its capacity to en- hance form. April 23 PLATE-O-MATIC with Jason Kiley During this workshop you will learn the Plate-o-matic process of creating beautiful plates bowls and wall decorations. In addition you will explore different surface decoration techniques such as tracing transfers using stencils wax resist designing and sticker resist methods. April 30 PRINTING ON CLAY with GW Lanham Shake off your reservations about surface decoration with straight- forward and functional surface treatments on clay. Demonstration will incorporate image transfer surface and texture printing. May 7 RESHAPING THE WHEEL with Eric Pardue Inthisworkshopdemonstrationswillfocusonalteringwheelthrown shapes to expand on the classic round pot. Decorative techniques including slips underglazes and decals will also be discussed. May 14 SURFACE DECORATION with Noelle Horsfield This workshop will cover the basics of the innovative etching carv- ing and underglaze decal techniques Noelle employs as surface decoration for her hand-built porcelain pots. We will provide a leather hard piece for practice so be prepared to have fun and take the surfaces of your own work to a whole new level. May 21 PIECES PARTS with Kathleen Kneafsey Have you ever wanted to make a bunch of things out of clay and put them together to create something special Then this work- shop is for you. Demonstrations of various vessels spouts lids handles legs and more will all be altered joined and reassembled to create new forms. Ceramic cups An artist is shown creating with clay in HMAs Studio 4. 18 Summer Camps at HMA Schools out...its hot...its summer time for camp Summer camps at the museum are a bustle of youthful energy and activ- ity. Kids are busy learning. They are exploring and experimenting. New friendships are forming and traditions are being built. And lets not forget camp is fun. Every age group is covered with HMAs camps from 18 months to seniors in high school. Each camp is designed with developmen- tally appropriate projects and learning methodologies. Varieties of topics are explored from art to nature to science to math to tech- nology to engineering and back again. In all of the camps kids are realizing that the Museum is a welcoming place where discovery imagination and creativity are encouraged. HMA camp teachers are professionals in the field of education and art. HMA provides exceptional camp experiences every summer for close to 200 kids. Pitter Patter Children aged 18 months to 3 years immerse themselves in variet- ies of tactile experiences during this camp. Parents and caregivers participate along with their kids. Several stations are set up in the studio space enabling kids to explore on their own at their own pace. Varieties of materials tools and toys are available for art making and play. A young artist explores painting. Young Explorers This camp is designed specifically for children ages 4-5. Activities include artmaking with varieties of materials and tools trail walks on HMAs nature trails and gallery games. Through game-based learning children learn how to interact with others accomplish tasks and practice 21st century skills. Parents are able to drop off their children for this half-day camp experience. This image shows students working on portraiture with sidewalk chalk. Creativity and fun are important aspects of camp. 19 Art Camp Art Camp is for elementary-aged kids and is divided into 3 sepa- rate age groups K-1 2nd-3rd 4th-5th. Children are beginning to develop fine motor skills and can explore more advanced tools materials and processes during elementary art camp. Clay Camp This two-week middle schoolhigh school clay camp is for students who are showing an interest in pursuing art. While creativity in- novation and self-expression are paramount to discoveries in clay even more important is a deeper and broader learning experience about one specific material clay. Nature Camp With HMAs mile-long nature trails through a beautiful wooded natural habitat what better place for an in-depth experience ex- ploring nature Campers spend the mornings on the trails in vari- eties of activities treeleaf identification and overturning rocks to find critters. At the very lowest part of the trails is a creek which offers a wealth of possibilities for nature study. The afternoons are filled with inside activities such as journaling the morning discov- eries and microscope studies. S.T.E.A.M. Camp Science technology engineering art and math This camp is a total immersion into extraordinary learning experiences. Part of the camp includes partnering with the June Harless Centers Arts Bots program. Campers learn to make and program a robot. Additional activities include art making microscope work and other activities that integrate these five disciplines in a creative and exciting way. Camp schedule for Summer 2016 Middle SchoolHigh School Clay Camp June 20-24 27-July 1 9 a.m. 3 p.m. Art Camp K-5 July 11-15 and July 18-22 9 a.m. 3 p.m. Pitter Patter 18 mos-3 years July 11-15 9 a.m. 1015 a.m. Young Explorers 4-5 years July 18-22 9 a.m. noon Nature Camp 3rd-5th July 25-29 9 a.m. 3 p.m. S.T.E.A.M. Camp 3rd-5th August 1-5 9 a.m. 3 p.m. For more information and to register visit the Museums website at www.hmoa.org. Learning to throw on the potters wheel. Campers making clay busts. Posing for a group shot on the trails. Conducting experiments in the studio. A camper works with a microscope. Campers are preparing to make and program their robots. 20 Classes Figure Drawing Every 4th Tuesday February - June 6-8 p.m. Throughout history artists have drawn from a model. This practice not only builds valuable eyehand coordination but helps to hone skills in observation. Line shadow form shape tone balance its all there in the human figure. Join fellow artists for an evening in the studio drawing from life. There is no need to register for this drop-in class. Just show up and enjoy drawing with other artists. There will be a monitor on hand to guide the class. The fee is 10 per session. Model fee included. Bring your own materials pencil charcoal pastels paper. Basic Photographic Techniques Wednesdays March 2 - April 6 6 sessions 6-8 p.m. Instructor Larry Rees Studio 3 110 Members 135 Non-Members Learn how to use your new camera This intensive workshop will cover a broad range of valuable information for photogra- phers how to use your equipment compositionlightingpre- sentation and traditional darkroomdigital darkroomMacro photo. Also included will be brief lectures and off-site field trips. Participants can use either 35 mm or digital cameras. IntermediateAdvanced Photographic Techniques Thursdays February 25 - March 31 6 sessions 6-8 p.m. Instructor Larry Rees Studio 3 110 Members 135 Non-Members Hold onto your hat this class will be full of valuable learning. A quick review of camera operations and camera controls will enable participants to explore the use of filters for color and black white including how to make filters. Working with and without shadows and reflections will be explored as well as use of studio lighting and posing techniques. And of course being able to see and get the photo you want Hand Building and Wheel Throwing for Adults Mondays February 29 - April 18 8 sessions 6-8 p.m. Instructor Kathleen Kneafsey Studio 4 180 Members 205 Non-Members If you have never touched clay or love it so much that you cant get enough of it then this is the class for you. All levels are welcome as participants will have the chance to explore a wide variety of methods used to create both functional as well as sculptural ceramic pieces. New techniques will be demonstrated each week to introduce and improve skills through the use of the potters wheel extruder slab roller and various hand-building methods. Surface decoration and glazing techniques will also be explored with the use of colored slips and glazes. Students will complete their work by experiencing various firing methods utilizing the electric kilns as well as the gas kiln. First 25 lbs of clay is included in class price. Additional clay is 1025 lbs. Open Studio Wednesdays March 2 - April 20 and May 11 - June 15 6-8 p.m. Monitor Kathleen Kneafsey Studios 4 5 15 per evening Take a break at the end of your hectic day and make some art Open Studio welcomes artists to work on their own utilizing the museums facilities equipment and open studio space. If you are interested in pottery then Studio 4 is the place for you with potters wheels a slab roller an extruder glazing materials and more. Clay is 1025 lbs. If you are interested in printmak- ing then you will want to be in Studio 5 with the printing press. And if you want to just make art in the company of fellow artists then come along join in the fun and share the space. Creativity with Clay Sundays February 21 - March 13 4 sessions 2-4 p.m. Instructor Kathleen Kneafsey Studio 4 65 Members 80 Non-Members Middle schoolhigh school What better way to spend a Sunday afternoon than elbow-deep in clay Students will learn all the methods of hand building as well as how to throw on the potters wheel. Throughout this four-week class there will be lots of opportunities for building skills in clay and self-expression through making and decorating your unique creations. All materials included in price. Homeschool Art Light Clay Action Wednesdays March 2 - March 23 4 sessions 11 a.m.-1230 p.m. Instructor Kathleen Kneafsey Studios 4 5 45 Members 65 Non-Member 15 each additional child In this session students will make their own pinhole cameras utilizing light to create images. Working as teams they will also venture into the world of claymation and create their own stop- motion animation short films. Saturday KidsArt for children K-5th grades Every Saturday 1 - 3 p.m. Instructors Shelby Spence Grace Skiles Zoe Myers Studio 5 Saturday KidsArt is the place to be to enjoy adventures in cre- ativity and self-expression. Kids bring your parents and grand- parents and have a great time FREE thanks to the generous sponsorship of Cabell Huntington Hospital. Basic Watercolor Tuesdays April 5 - May 24 8 sessions 1030 a.m. -1 p.m. Instructor Lisa Walden Studio 2 180 Members 205 Non-Members In this class you will learn simple and basic techniques that will open your eyes to the magic of watercolor painting. Experimentation and practice will yield amazing and exciting results as your images emerge on paper. A supply list will be provided at the first class. Just bring yourself and some eager anticipation. Advanced Watercolor Wednesdays April 6 - May 25 8 sessions 10 a.m. -1 p.m. Instructor Lisa Walden Studio 2 180 Members 205 Non-Members Advanced watercolorists will have the opportunity to work in a creative environment with fellow artists. What a great opportunity to share ideas and explore new and innovative techniques. For Teens For Kids 21 Museum Ball 2016 Snapshots HMAs Switzer Gallery was beautifully trans- formed for the Museum Ball 2016. Photo by Alexandria Runyon. Susan Nicholas and HMA Board Member Doug Korstanje attend the 2016 Museum Ball. Photo by John Gillispie. Tim and Christie Kinsey who is a member of HMAs Board of Trustees visit the James D. Francis Library to view the silent auction items for the 2016 Museum Ball. Photo by John Gil- lispie. Museum Shop Manager Ashley Saunders poses with her sister April Saunders Tooley at the 2016 Museum Ball. Photo by John Gillispie. Dr. Michael Canty and Connie Breece pose for a photo in HMAs Virginia Van Zandt Great Hall during the 2016 Museum Ball. Photo by Alexandria Runyon. A colorful table decoration from the Museum Ball 2016. Photo by Alexandria Runyon. Thanks to design by Deborah Pohlman Interiors HMA was beautifully decorated for the 2016 Museum Ball. Photo by Alexandria Runyon. 22 23 24 Huntington Symphony Concerts Call 304 781-8343 or visit www.huntingtonsymphony.org for upcoming concert and ticket information. HSO and HMA have col- laborated for many years to promote arts in the Tri-State Region. Events Macys Presents Hilltop Books Only will take place on Saturday August 20 2016 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on Sunday August 21 2016 from noon to 5 p.m. Admission is 5 on Saturday and free on Sunday courtesy of Macys. The Museum Shop Holiday Preview will take place on Tuesday November 8 2016 from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Camden Park Presents Holiday Open House on Sunday December 4 2016 from 1 to 4 p.m. Admission is free but please bring nonperishable food items for the Facing Hunger Foodbank and warm clothes for the Cridlin Food Clothing Pantry. West Virginia residents may obtain a summary of the registra- tion and financial documents from the Secretary of State State Capitol Charleston WV 25305. Registration does not imply endorsement. Join Us on Facebook If you would like to read posts about the Huntington Museum of Art and The Museum Shop on Facebook we invite you to join the more than 6400 people who like HMAs Facebook page. Send us your name and email address to sign up for our free electronic newsletters and updates about HMA and The Museum Shop. Programs Walter Gropius Master Artist Series Abelardo Morell Presentation on June 16 2016 at 7 p.m. Exhibit runs March 5 through June 26 2016. Brooke Atherton Presentation on September 8 2016 at 7 p.m. Exhibit runs July 9 through September 11 2016. Patrick Lee Presentation on October 13 2016 at 7 p.m. Exhibit runs September 24 through December 23 2016. calendar Exhibits Water Water Everywhere Paean to a Vanishing Resource con- tinues through June 19 2016. Courtyard Series Kathleen Kneafsey continues through March 27 2016. Macys Presents Haitian Art from the Permanent Collection runs March 12 through July 17 2016. This exhibit will be in the spotlight on March 22 2016 at 7 p.m. as part of the 4th Tuesday Tour Series at HMA. Refreshments will be served. This is a Macys Free Tuesday event. Here to There An Exhibition of Work by West Virginia Univer- sity School of Art and Design Faculty runs March 19 through June 12 2016. Opening reception takes place on March 19 from 6 to 8 p.m. Admission to the opening reception is free. Portfolio 2016 exhibit of artwork by high school and middle school students will run April 2 to May 8 2016. Opening recep- tion takes place on April 2 2016 at 2 p.m. Admission to the opening reception is free. Studio Selections exhibit runs May 17 through June 26 2016. Opening reception will take place on May 17 at 6 p.m. Admission to this Macys Free Tuesday event is free. Tri-State Arts Association exhibit runs June 4 through July 10 2016. Opening reception takes place on Sunday June 5 2016 from 2 to 4 p.m. Admission to this event is free. Earth Stories runs June 25 through Oct. 2 2016. Opening recep- tion takes place on July 26 at 7 p.m. This is a Macys Free Tuesday event. A Talent Forgotten The Art of Edith Lake Wilkinson runs July 2 through Sept. 18 2016. Opening reception takes place on July 17 2016 from 2 to 4 p.m. Admission to this opening reception is free. The Daywood Collection exhibit runs July 23 through October 30 2016. Dutch Treat Paintings and Prints from the Netherlands runs July 31 through October 16 2016. Funded by the Roxanna Booth Bequest the West Virginia Commission on the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts a federal agency. West Virginia Residents may obtain a summary of the registration and financial documents from the Secretary of State State Capitol Charleston WV 25305. Registration does not imply endorsement. Ac- credited by the American Alliance of Museums. HMA is fully accessible. H U N T I N G T O N MUSEUM OF ART 2033 McCoy Road Huntington WV 25701-4999 NONPROFIT U.S. POSTAGE PAID Huntington WV Permit No. 24 TheMuseumShop Holiday Preview November 8 2016 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. www.hmoa.org 304 529-2701 general INFORMATION Website www.hmoa.org 304 529-2701 FAX 304 529-7447 MUSEUM HOURS Evening Hours on Tuesday 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. Wednesday - Saturday 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sunday Noon - 5 p.m. Closed Monday. HMA charges a general admission. HMA members will be admitted free and Bauhaus School members may bring guests free of charge. Admission is free each Tuesday. Admission is also free to children younger than 18 active duty military personnel and their immediate families and veterans and their immediate families. USE THIS QR CODE TO SEE A LIST OF UPCOMING EVENTS AT HMA.