HMA Admission Policy Click Here for Details

Upcoming

The long tradition of the artistic still life dates to ancient times in Egypt and the classical worlds of Greece and Rome, as depictions of tabletop arrangements of food and other objects have been found in Egyptian tombs, on Greek vases, and in mosaics and wall paintings unearthed in Pompeii. The genre began to thrive during the Renaissance, especially in northern Europe where Dutch and Flemish painters excelled in producing ultra-realistic depictions of inanimate objects such as flowers, dead game, food and wine, kitchen utensils and glassware. Though relegated to the lowest levels of importance by the European academic hierarchies who valued more lofty and esoteric subject matter, still life paintings were popular with art buyers and sold well.

The still life genre was even embraced by the iconoclastic painters of the 19th and 20th centuries in spite of its firm roots in tradition and has been a continuing theme in American painting.

The Huntington Museum of Art will display a wide-ranging group of still-life works from its collection, including a sumptuous painting by 17th century Italian painter Bartolommeo Bettera, a pastel drawing by Cubist master Georges Braque, and several examples by American artists such as John Peto, Jack Beal, and Gloria Vanderbilt. In addition to works by Robert Freimark, Blanche Lazzell, and Leslie Shiels, this exhibit will include three works that were acquired in recent years from the prestigious collection of the late Dr. William Gerdts, the preeminent scholar on American still life, and his wife, Abigail Gerdts.

This exhibit is presented by Garth’s Auctioneers & Appraisers.

This exhibit is presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Portfolio 2021

April 17 - May 16, 2021

Portfolio is designed to showcase the exemplary artwork of middle school and high school students in the Tri-State region of West Virginia, Ohio, and Kentucky. This year, after a hiatus in 2020 because of the COVID-19 pandemic and continued health concerns, the Portfolio 2021 exhibition has been reorganized to showcase the best senior high school student art. In limiting the exhibition it is our goal to meet CDC guidelines while still recognizing these young artists and their teachers, creating an opportunity to participate in a high-quality exhibition within a museum setting and providing a venue for graduating students to build a portfolio for advanced study. Portfolio 2021 will not be juried this year, rather each senior student will receive a small cash prize for their participation. One student will be selected for the Janet Bromley Excellence in the Arts Award to be chosen by the Museum’s Curator. We are optimistically hopeful to return to a full exhibition, reception and award ceremony for Portfolio 2022.

This exhibit is presented with support from The Katherine & Herman Pugh Exhibitions Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Portfolio 2021

Wheels

July 3 - October 3, 2021

The wheel is one of civilization’s greatest inventions. Though derived from a simple shape, the construction of a working wheel took great ingenuity, and it was only within the last six millennia that a wheel-and-axle combination appears in the human record. This development was a significant advancement in technology as it allowed more efficient agricultural cultivation and vastly revolutionized transportation. It also was utilized in many other applications, such as pottery making and food processing.

HMA will celebrate this remarkable device with an exhibition of works that feature images of wheels in use. From the creations of folk artists such as Herman Hayes’ whimsical sculpture Large Star Wheel With Four Supporting Figures and Evan Decker’s Cowboy With Bells, Wheels, Squirrels, Hens to Huntington photographer Levi Holley Stone’s images of automobiles and bicycles, a variety of wheel-themed works are included.

Pop culture is represented in original artwork for comic books and strips depicting the Batmobile and Little Orphan Annie, while John Baeder’s Royal Diner illustrates the prevalence of the automobile in American culture. The exhibition features a wide range of mediums and will allow the viewer an opportunity to step back and look at a common object from a new perspective.

This exhibit is presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.