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Presented in Memory of Women’s Art Historian Chris Petteys

Please join us for the opening reception for this exhibit on March 3, 2019, from 2 to 4 p.m. with Martha R. Severens, former curator of the Greenville County Museum of Art and longtime collaborator with The Johnson Collection, presenting The Dr. Lawrence B. and Shirley Gang Memorial Lecture on Central to Their Lives, an exhibit of artwork by women artists of the South, borrowed from The Johnson Collection, Spartanburg, South Carolina. Martha R. Severens is the author of several books, including “The Charleston Renaissance” and “Andrew Wyeth: America’s Painter.”

“Art is central to my life. Not being able to make or see art would be a major deprivation.” ~ Nell Blaine (1922–1996)

Nell Blaine’s assertion about the centrality—the essentiality—of art to her life has a particular resonance. The Virginia painter’s creative path began early and, over the course of her life, she overcame significant barriers in her quest to make and see art, including serious vision problems, polio, and paralysis. And then, there was her gender. Growing up in the South, the expectations for a young woman probably did not include a career as a professional artist. In that society, Blaine noted, art was often considered “a genteel thing, prissy, and somewhat bland.”

Most Southern women were steered toward more domestic pursuits, and many talented women artists abandoned their creative endeavors once they married. Some, however, broke free of societal expectations to become successful painters, sculptors, and printmakers. Many moved to large urban areas such as New York City, but others remained in the South and pursued their passions, becoming influential teachers and exhibiting artists.

Spanning the decades between the late 1890s and early 1960s, this exhibition examines the particularly complex challenges female artists confronted in a traditionally conservative region during a period in which women’s social, cultural, and political roles were being redefined and reinterpreted.

How did the variables of historical gender norms, educational barriers, race, regionalism, sisterhood, suffrage, and modernism mitigate and motivate women seeking expression on canvas or in clay?

Whether working from dedicated studio spaces, in spare rooms at home, or on the world stage, the artists showcased made remarkable contributions by fostering future generations of artists through instruction, incorporating new aesthetics into the fine arts, and challenging the status quo.

Located in Spartanburg, South Carolina, the Johnson Collection seeks to illuminate the rich history and diverse cultures of the American South. With holdings that offer an extensive survey of artistic activity from the late 18th century to the present day, the collection works to advance interest in the dynamic role that the art of the South plays in the larger context of American art and to contribute to the canon of art historical literature.

This exhibit is presented In Memory of Women’s Art Historian Chris Petteys.

Presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture, and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Opening reception takes place on March 3, 2019, from 2 to 4 p.m. Admission is free.

As a companion to the exhibition Central to Their Lives: Southern Women Artists in the Johnson Collection, the Huntington Museum of Art will feature a show titled Women Artists of the Mountain State, drawn from the museum’s permanent collection.

Though the rural nature of the state often limited the opportunities that were available for aspiring artists, whether male or female, there are nevertheless several notable West Virginia women who achieved success as professional artists. Chief among them is Blanche Lazzell, a Morgantown native whose woodblock prints and paintings are renowned for their modernist style.

Edith Lake Wilkinson, from Wheeling, was Lazzell’s contemporary in the rich artistic community in Provincetown, Massachusetts, in the early 20th century, where she produced a small but finely crafted body of work.

Many others worked in the colleges and universities in West Virginia, including June Kilgore at Marshall University, Grace Martin Frame Taylor at Morris Harvey College/University of Charleston and Paula Clendenin at West Virginia State University. Some assisted with the founding of art centers and museums in the state, such as Katherine Burnside with the Parkersburg Art Center and Olga Thabet at the Huntington Galleries (later Huntington Museum of Art). Their rich contributions to the state’s culture have inspired and enriched the lives of countless West Virginians, and recognition for their efforts is long overdue.

This exhibit is presented in Memory of Women’s Art Historian Chris Petteys.

Presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture, and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Sarah Amos will speak about her work in a free public presentation at the Huntington Museum of Art on May 16, 2019, at 7 p.m. A reception follows. The artist will present a three-day workshop at HMA titled “Image Weaving with the Multi Plate Collagraph Technique” from May 17-19, 2019, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call (304) 529-2701 for workshop fee information.

Born in Melbourne, Australia, Sarah Amos studied at the Phillip Institute of Technology in Melbourne and earned her MFA from the Vermont Studio Center/Johnson State College. She is a Tamarind Institute-trained Master Printer, and is represented in corporate, public and private collections nationally and internationally including the Time Warner Collection, New York; the Dartmouth- Hitchcock Permanent Collection, New Hampshire; and La Trobe University Museum, Melbourne. In addition to her active artistic practice, Amos teaches at Dartmouth University, Hanover, New Hampshire.

A self-described “visual archaeologist,” Sarah Amos creates dynamic, multi-layered prints, drawings and textile works that combine impressions of the external world with the personal experience of memory. These often-large-scale abstracted explorations of form and pattern call to mind the textiles found in indigenous and ancient cultures. Amos is inspired by the psychological power inherent in ritual and ceremonial masks from Africa, Asia and, particularly, the American Mardi-Gras Indians who wear flamboyant, hand-crafted full-body costumes. She is fascinated by the concept of embellishment as both physical and emotional camouflage.

The artist will discuss his work during a free public presentation at HMA on March 7, 2019, at 7 p.m. The artist will facilitate a three-day workshop at HMA titled “Slab Construction and Textured Surfaces” on March 8-10, 2019. Call (304) 529-2701 for workshop fee information.

Jeff Shapiro (b. 1949, NY) studied ceramic arts while living in Japan for almost a decade. He has exhibited his work internationally and is represented in numerous museum collections around the world, including The Carlo Zauli Museum, Faenza, Italy; The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and The Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, New York. He has led workshops in many countries and built two wood fire kilns in Italy. Shapiro lives and works in upstate New York with his wife, Hinako.

Jeff Shapiro is both a master potter and a master storyteller, with as many insightful and humorous anecdotes as technical and aesthetic thoughts. He has an extensive background in Japanese ceramic techniques and works in a variety of genres, from sake cups and tea bowls to abstract sculpture and large-scale works. His unique ceramic style fuses traditional and contemporary visions and is characterized by a combination of elegance and handmade earthiness. Shapiro embraces natural irregularities that emerge through his process. “I respond to the beauty that exists in the imperfections of nature,” writes Shapiro. “A torn leaf, a crack in a cement wall, a twisted branch, a shaft of lightning cutting through the night sky – all have the potential to be dimensions of beauty that feed the artistic soul and creative process.”

THIS EXHIBIT WILL NOT BE ON VIEW FROM FEB. 13-17, 2019, AS WE PREPARE FOR THE 2019 MUSEUM BALL ON FEB. 16, 2019, AND DE-INSTALL THE EVENT ON FEB. 17, 2019.

The artist will present a free public presentation about his work on March 21, 2019, at 7 p.m. at HMA. The artist will facilitate a three-day workshop at HMA titled “Drawing From Our Mind And Through Our Eyes” on March 22-24, 2019. Call (304) 529-2701 for workshop fee information.

Jason Bard Yarmosky was born in New York in 1987 and began drawing as a child. He graduated with a BFA from the School of Visual Arts in New York City in 2010. His paintings and drawings have been exhibited and collected internationally. His work has been featured in Juxtapoz, Hi-Fructose, and numerous publications around the world. He is a past winner of the Elizabeth Greenshields Award. Yarmosky lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

Yarmosky pushes the conceptual boundaries of traditional portrait painting and drawing by focusing on aging subjects in contrast to the historical glorification of youth. His artistic work, both classically rendered and theatrically composed, examines the complexities of the aging experience and explores questions of memory, time, and mortality revealed in the tension between the physical and psychological transformations endured by his subjects.

Camden Park Presents Art on a Limb

November 20 - January 6, 2019

Please join us for Camden Park Presents Holiday Open House on Sunday, December 2, 2018, from 1 to 4 p.m. The event features holiday music and dance performances, a visit from Santa Claus, holiday shopping in the Museum Gift Shop, refreshments and children’s art activities. Admission is free, but please bring warm clothes for the Cridlin Food & Clothing Pantry and nonperishable food for the Facing Hunger Foodbank.

In celebration of the holiday season, area artists and artist groups apply their skills and share their talents to decorate trees throughout the museum. In the Virginia Van Zandt Great Hall, at the entrance of the museum, is the 12-foot tall Palette Tree. This tree is decorated with artist palettes. Each palette is hand-decorated by a different artist in that artist’s unique style. Altogether there are more than 50 one-of-a-kind palettes on this tree.

Throughout the museum, in different gallery spaces, there are additional trees. Each one of these trees is decorated with ornaments from an area artist group. Ornaments from Woodworkers & Woodturners decorate one tree. At the end of the Virginia Van Zandt Great Hall is the Folk Art tree. The West Virginia Bead Society decorates the tree in HMA’s Glass Gallery, which is presented by Cabell Huntington Hospital. The Tri-Area Needle Arts members decorate the tree at the end of the Bridge Gallery. In front of the window at the far end of the Daywood Gallery is the tree decorated by the Western Weavers Guild of the West Virginia Basketmakers. Finally, at the entrance to the Daine Gallery is the tree decorated by the Calligraphers Guild.

The Daywood Collection

September 29 - February 3, 2019

This exhibit will be in the spotlight during the November Tuesday Tour on November 27, 2018, at 7 p.m. This is a Macy’s Free Tuesday event.

Some of the artists represented in the exhibit include Childe Hassam, Gari Melchers, Frank W. Benson, Robert Henri and Howard Somerville, whose painting Joyce is one of the most beloved by Museum Members in HMA’s permanent collection of more than 15,000 objects.

Arthur S. Dayton (1887-1948), and Ruth Woods Dayton (1894-1978) compiled The Daywood Collection and Mrs. Dayton donated the collection of more than 300 works of art to HMA in December 1966.

This exhibit is presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Patterns of Inspiration

February 23 - April 7, 2019

This exhibit will be highlighted during the 4th Tuesday Tour on February 26, 2019, at 7 p.m. This is a Macy’s Free Tuesday event.

For centuries, the colorful carpets that have been woven in Central Asia and the Near East have been featured in paintings by artists from western cultures. The most well-known examples are those by European painters such as Hans Holbein, Giovanni Bellini, Hans Memling and Jan van Eyck, whose depictions of the rugs are often important records of early weaving styles.

While the Huntington Museum of Art does not have the good fortune to own any of those iconic paintings, it does have several artworks that feature rugs from a variety of world cultures. The earliest of these is a still-life painting from the late 18th century by the Italian artist Bartolommeo Bettera, which features a prominently displayed rug that serves as a patterned foundation for a magnificent display of flowers.

Other works in the collection that utilize the complex patterns of woven textiles range from a painting by the Spanish Orientalist painter Clemint Pujol Gustavino that features a woman seated on a rug in an elaborate Middle Eastern courtyard to a contemporary photographic portrait by Bonnie Schiffman of the painter Richard Diebenkorn, who sits perched in a chair atop an Oriental rug with his pet beagle at his side.

Five aquatints by the artist Katja Oxman add another group of works from the collection that feature the intricate weavings of craftsmen from around the globe. Oxman pictures patterned textiles underneath collections of personal objects such as postcards, pet birds, houseplants, bowls of fruit, watches, books, and feathers. Her recent gifts to HMA will be shown for the first time in this exhibition.

Accompanying the group of prints, paintings and photographs in the exhibition will be a selection of Islamic prayer rugs from the museum’s collection. These rugs were among the featured works in the museum’s collection when it opened in 1952, a gift from museum founder Herbert Fitzpatrick. According to his associate Eddie Kyle, Fitzpatrick would “go to the ends of the earth” to pursue his passion for collecting rugs. His gift includes many fine examples from Turkey and the adjoining regions of the Caucasus, along with a small selection of Turkoman tribal rugs.

Presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

BRIAN MICHAEL REED: IN THE CROSSCURRENT

November 3 - February 3, 2019

Exhibit curated by Laura Roulet

Opening reception for this exhibit will take place on November 11, 2018, from 2 to 4 p.m. Admission is free.

In the Crosscurrent juxtaposes vibrant sculpture by native West Virginia artist Brian Michael Reed with Vodou-based works selected from the Museum’s Collection of Haitian Art. These artworks focus on using everyday materials and objects to activate the spirit through assemblage, ritual and symbolism. Washington D.C.-based guest curator Laura Roulet draws cross-cultural connections between Reed’s staffs, inspired by West African Kongo minkisi, and the Afro-Caribbean imagery associated with the practice of Vodou.

Reed has been a collector of natural objects since his youth. Seeds, shells, and feathers are among the materials he uses to embellish weighty wood staffs, salvaged from his family farm. His use of found materials with personal and metaphorical significance is a way of giving spiritual depth to his artwork; as with African minkisi, binding together materials with symbolic value is a means of attracting the spirit, giving an object meaning beyond its formal qualities.

Motifs found in Reed’s sculptures, such as stars for the cosmos, birds and plants for regeneration, are universal and also often found in art of the African diaspora. Though Reed is a student of many diverse cultures and a global traveler, living most recently in China, this body of work focuses on art influenced by Africa and the African diaspora.

Following a revolution led by Toussaint L’Ouverture in 1804, Haiti became the second independent nation in the Americas, after the United States. As a former French colony, largely repopulated by African slaves, Haiti maintains a unique creole culture. The Haitian paintings, sculpture, and ritual objects in this exhibit all relate to Vodou, which is a syncretic religion evolved from West African traditions combined with elements of Catholicism. In this context, images of saints sometimes take on a double meaning. A green-clad man wielding a staff to drive away snakes on a beaded banner (drapo) is recognizable as Saint Patrick to Christians, but also represents Damballah, the Vodou spirit (lwa) of wisdom. The female lwa of love, Ezili, who is represented by the vèvè drawing of a heart with flowers, may be depicted as the Madonna. What appears to American eyes as a mermaid, is La

Sirèn, the female spirit of the ocean, symbolized by fish, shells, a mirror or comb, and the colors of blue and white. Altars are created with offerings and objects such as painted gourds and banners for use in rituals to attract a
particular spirit. The Anderson Collection contains a rich trove of the sacred art of Vodou, which is demystified and enhanced by this dialogue with Reed’s assemblages.

In the Crosscurrent explores what gives an artwork spiritual power and meaning. How are objects activated by the maker and viewer? What do figures, shapes and colors symbolize? Can you make cross-cultural connections of your own?

Presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture, and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Opening reception for this exhibit takes place on November 18 from 2 to 4 p.m. Admission is free. The artist will conduct a walking tour of his work in the gallery on Tuesday, January 15, at 7 p.m. This is a Macy’s Free Tuesday event.

Contemporary society is awash in a sea of images. Nearly everyone has a phone in their purse or pocket that can instantly capture the likeness of a friend or create a self-portrait. Social media sites such as Facebook can then distribute the images to a vast audience anywhere in the world. With this potential at our fingertips, why do artists still pursue the rather time-consuming art of portrait painting?

A collection of portraits by Point Pleasant, West Virginia, artist Jamie Sloane illustrates the power that still resides in the artist’s brush to represent the human figure. Unlike many of the photographic portraits that are pushed through cyberspace, the contemporary painted portrait, even if done in a realistic style, does not have to be about physical reality. It can be a manipulation of the elements on the picture plane that creates fiction through symbols and background, telling a story that can be puzzling and mysterious. At times the artist even obscures the subject’s face, the most basic element in the traditional portrait.

One of the first works in Sloane’s series, a painting titled Visiteur No. 2, featured a subject the artist only knew from a 1920s-era mugshot from California’s notorious San Quentin Prison. Sloane portrayed inmate George Herbert Tarver in a formal setting, complete with a wooden rocking chair, highly decorated wallpaper, and a bright electric lamp from the period. In his hand he clutches a child’s piggy bank emblazoned with an American flag, symbolic of his conviction on charges of grand larceny.

In another work, Visiteur No. 7, the artist features himself, seated formally in a military-style jacket that harkens back to the portraits of generations ago that often made a grand display of uniforms and regalia.

Sloane says that many of his portraits are comments on the brevity of our lives, utilizing the formal chairs of the old-fashioned parlor as metaphors for human existence, since they were only meant to be used for short visits. His work borrows from high-style European portrait painting as well as paintings from the Ming and Qing dynasties in China. The Chinese portraits were often of family ancestors and well-known public figures, and frequently featured decorative rugs, a flattened picture plane and formal settings with the subject in a seated position. Sloane says he has also been influenced by the paintings of French artist Edouard Vuillard, who utilized intricate wallpaper patterns as a background in many of his works.

Born and raised in Huntington, Sloane grew up studying classical music and later studied music composition at Marshall University. Sloane’s other passion was art, which was exercised first as a hobby and then later became a full-time career. His work is found in numerous collections, including the historic Lowe Hotel in Point Pleasant, West Virginia.

As a companion to the exhibition, Sloane is creating a video documentary that chronicles his preparation for the show.

This exhibit is presented by Jack and Angie Bourdelais.

Presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

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