Past

A guided tour of the exhibit takes place during the Fourth Tuesday Tour on March 24, 2015, at 7 p.m. Admission is free. Refreshments will be served. This is a Macy’s Free Tuesday event.

Beginning with works from the early 18th century by Maria Sibylla Merian (Dutch, 1647-1717), and continuing into the 21st century with works from 2013 by Kate Bingaman- Burt (American, b. 1977), this exhibit will examine works by women artists who use the medium of paper to explore their world. The exhibit will include drawing, pastel, prints, photography, watercolor, hand-made paper, molded paper pulp, and a mixed media quilt.

The exhibit will include approximately 50 works by artists including (besides the two mentioned above) Käthe Kollwitz, Marie Laurencin, Sonia Delaunay, Berenice Abbott, Blanche Lazzell, Louise Nevelson, Gloria Vanderbilt, Marcia Marx, Lee Bontecou, Yvonne Jacquette, Helen Frankenthaler, Kiki Smith, Miriam Schapiro, Ida Kohlmeyer, Lesley Dill, Maggie Taylor, Janet Fish, Lynda Benglis, Alison Saar, Joan Mitchell, Carrie Mae Weems, Sandy Skoglund, and Sook Jin Jo, among others.

The exhibit will be presented in the Museum’s Daine Gallery, which was designed specifically for exhibitions featuring works on paper. The show will be on view during March, Women’s History Month. Since the year 2000, there has been a conscious effort on the Museum’s part to acquire works by women, and artists of color for the permanent collection. This is the first in a series of exhibits, which will present a selection of works by women artists in a variety of media.

This exhibit is presented by Macy’s. Additional financial support for this exhibit is provided by the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Designed with a Twist

February 2 - November 22, 2015

Since the beginning of glass blowing more than 2,000 years ago, different design techniques have been used to add variety to simple vessel shapes. Once design technique involves a twist of hot glass, and this twist can range from a simple turn of the wrist as seen in Fritz Dreisbach’s Goblet from 1976, to a complicated manipulation of a bubble inside the stem as seen in the “air twist,” or the spiraling action of colored enamel rods in the stem of a glass as seen in the “cotton twist.”

All of the works on view in this Glass Gallery exhibit come from the Museum’s permanent collection, and range in date from the latter half of the 18th century to the late 20th century.

This exhibit is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Goblet photo by Amanda Abbott and Brittany Ward.

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