Past

Mary H. Hodges, In Memory of J. Churchill Hodges, Presents: COLLECTION WISDOM: Emeritus & Honorary Trustees Select will be featured during the January 2015 4th Tuesday Tour at 7 p.m. January 27, 2015. Admission is free. Refreshments will be served.

For the next year-and-a-half the Museum has scheduled a series of small exhibitions that will tap the knowledge which our Trustees and Staff have gleaned about HMA’s collection during their many years of involvement with this institution. We had great success with an exhibition in 2010 called Docents Select, and we are presenting these follow-up shows with collection picks from staff and board members; for who better knows the collection and the mission of the Museum?

This series of shows will be presented on the Bridge Gallery, and will be divided into four distinct exhibits as follows:

Emeritus and Honorary Board Members (October 25, 2014 – February 15, 2015)

HMA Staff (March 21, 2015 – July 12, 2015)

Voting Board Members I (July 25, 2015 – November 8, 2015)

Voting Board Members II (November 21, 2015 – February 21, 2016)

We are asking each trustee and staff member to pick a favorite small-scale work, and provide a short write-up explaining why a specific work was selected. It will be interesting to view their choices!

This exhibit is presented by Mary H. Hodges, In Memory of J. Churchill Hodges. Additional support for this exhibit is provided by the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Koo Schadler will speak about her work at 7 p.m. March 26, 2015, at HMA. Admission to this public presentation is free. Schadler will present a workshop at HMA titled “The Still Life in Egg Tempera” from March 27-29, 2015. The workshop is full and we cannot accept any additional registrations for the workshop. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Schadler earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Tufts University, Boston, MA, in 1984. After graduating, she traveled extensively throughout Europe, settling in Florence, Italy, to pursue her studies in art history and painting. Schadler returned to the states in 1986 and moved to California. There she was introduced to egg tempera, one of the oldest painting techniques, by Chester Arnold at the College of Marin. She moved east in the 1990s, to a small town in southern New Hampshire. With a deepening commitment to the techniques of the Old Masters, Schadler studied oil painting with husband and wife duo, Numael and Shirley Pulido – renowned for their understanding of classical painting principles – while mastering egg tempera on her own. She established a studio and now pursues full-time the study and creation of egg tempera paintings and silverpoint drawings.

Schadler is a Master Painter of The Copley Society of Boston, a contributing editor at The Artist’s Magazine and a board member of the International Society of Tempera Painters. Schadler writes and lectures on egg tempera and teaches tempera and gesso-making workshops around the US and abroad. Schadler’s paintings and drawings are in more than 400 private and corporate collections and many museums nationwide. Her work is represented by the Arden Gallery in Boston, MA, and Tree’s Place in Orleans, MA.

Schadler favors the pre-Renaissance medium of egg yolks, powdered pigment and water to create astoundingly detailed, intensely colored egg tempera paintings of the natural world. Employed by artists from Botticelli to Wyeth, egg tempera paint is generally applied in scores of diluted, thin, often transparent layers of color. As the image builds, the interaction of these layers of color creates the rich, luminous look and brilliant surface unique to tempera paintings. Schadler’s masterfully executed works draw inspiration from the compositions and traditional settings of Northern and Italian Renaissance paintings. However, the common cast of biblical characters is replaced by birds, bugs, frogs, terrapins, rabbits and other creatures. Like a medieval manuscript illuminator, Schadler often incorporates lettering into her work, juxtaposed with the minutiae of nature.

In her artist statement, Schadler writes: “I became a painter because of my love for craftsmanship and my love for Old Master painting. My love for the natural world gives me my subject matter. These inspirations are fundamental, and sufficient to explain all the artwork I produce. My artwork gives me the opportunity to quietly observe nature. Animals, particularly the quiet and inconspicuous varieties, are among my favorite subjects. They are visually interesting and beautifully patterned; mysterious and unknowable; of infinite value to humans and the world at large. I enjoy placing them at center stage. To me there is nothing as well-designed as the alphabet, as geometrically pure as a seashell, as visually graceful as a flower, or as decorative as a spotted bunny.”

The Walter Gropius Master Artist Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition, as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

The opening reception for this event takes place on Sunday, March 8, 2015, from 2 to 4 p.m.

The Huntington Museum of Art will be one of three venues for the West Virginia Art & Craft Guild’s 10th Juried Competition. The exhibit was open to all artists and crafts persons and showcases both established and emerging artists.

Prior to traveling to Huntington, the exhibit will have been on view at the Parkersburg Art Center (November 16 – December 27, 2014), and the Wheeling Artisan Center (January 15 – February 21, 2015). The jurors for this year’s exhibit were Atticus Adams, a sculptor from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, who grew up in West Virginia, and Mark Tobin Moore, a collage artist who lives in Charleston, West Virginia, and who is also a Professor of Art and Art History at Concord University in Athens, WV. Seventy-three works of art were selected, representing 41 artists.

The West Virginia Art & Craft Guild is a non-profit membership organization, formed in 1963 by people determined to preserve and promote the creative lifestyle in West Virginia. Its projects include workshops, a craft marketing program, co-sponsorship of the Mountain State Art and Craft Fair at Ripley, and this exhibition.

With this addition, the Huntington Museum of Art has become a venue for three important regional artist groups, Tri-State Arts Association, Allied Artists of West Virginia, and now, West Virginia Art & Craft Guild.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

West Virginia Art and Craft Guild 10th Juried Competition

The awards ceremony and opening reception will begin on Saturday, April 18, 2015, at 2 p.m.

Every spring HMA hosts an exhibition of art from the middle schools and high schools in our Tri-State area of West Virginia, Kentucky and Ohio. This event, called Portfolio, is very special for students and art teachers. Students are delighted to have their work displayed in a museum.

When they attend the opening, often with parents and family members, they are so pleased and proud of their accomplishments. Teachers also experience pride and gratification when they see their students being honored.

Monetary awards are an added bonus to all of these good feelings. A Professor of Art from Marshall University carefully views and judges all of the work, selecting the 13 award winners. This is a challenging task, taking time and consideration, since there are usually about 180 to 200 works of art in the Portfolio exhibit. There are eight recognition awards of $25 each; four excellence awards of $50 each; and one award for $100, the Janet Bromley Excellence in the Arts Award. These award winners are announced, recognized and congratulated at the opening reception. In addition, the judge delivers a presentation which is intended to give further learning and insight for students and teachers.

Participating Tri-State counties include Cabell, Putnam, Jackson, Wayne, Lincoln, Mingo and Mason in West Virginia; Lawrence County in Ohio; and Boyd and Greenup in Kentucky.

This exhibit is presented by the Marshall University College of Arts and Media.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Marshall University College of Arts and Media Presents Portfolio 2015

Studio Selections

May 12 - May 17, 2015

Opening Reception takes place on May 12, 2015, from 6 to 7 p.m.

Studio Selections is a celebration! Every spring HMA’s classes and workshop participants exhibit their work in HMA’s Virginia Van Zandt Great Hall. This great occasion brings family and friends to view artwork created by artists and to enjoy a reception to honor their accomplishments.

Classes offered at HMA include pottery, photography, drawing and watercolor.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Studio Selections

Jeffrey Sippel will give a public presentation about his work on October 1, 2015, at 7 p.m. Admission to the public presentation is free. Refreshments will be served. He will present a three-day workshop at HMA titled “Alternative Lithography and Monotype” on October 2-4, 2015, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call (304) 529-2701 for workshop fee information.

Jeffrey Sippel, Professor of Printmaking, joined the faculty of the University of St. Louis, Missouri, in 1998. Before that time he served as Education Director of Tamarind Institute from 1988 to 1998, The Ohio State University from 1985-1988 and in 1981 directed the Quensen Lithographic Studio in Lamspringe, Germany. He received his B.F.A. from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and his M.F.A. from Arizona State University.

Sippel has presented more than 60 lectures and workshops throughout the world. Sippel’s prints and mixed media artworks have been exhibited in more than 40 solo and two-person exhibitions, including exhibitions at Sala Negro, EL Instituto Chileno Nortreamericano, Santiago, Chile; the Schmidt Art Center, Belleville, IL; Gallery KO 25, Hanover, Germany; the University of Talca Gallery of Art, Santiago, Chile; and the Frans Masereel Centrum, Kasterlee, Belgium. He has also participated in more than 200 group exhibitions.

Sippel is represented by Gruen Galleries in Chicago and his work is in numerous public and corporate collections on four continents, including the Milwaukee Art Museum, Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, MO; Bibliotheque Nationale deFrance, Paris, France; and the Smithsonian National Museum of Art, Washington D.C.

The Walter Gropius Master Artist Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition, as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

The opening reception for this exhibit takes place during the Fourth Tuesday Tour on July 28, 2015, at 7 p.m. Beau Smith will be the guest speaker for the event. Admission is free. Refreshments will be served.

Once a uniquely American form of visual communication, the modern comic book and the dynamic cast of heroes and villains spawned within its pages are enjoying a meteoric worldwide renaissance.

While some printed media struggle to find readers, sales of comic books are peaking at their highest levels in two decades; scores of commercially successful and critically acclaimed comic book-inspired movies populate the box office; college students wear superheroes on university-licensed T-shirts to show school spirit; and the original artwork for newspaper comic strips and comic books has become a prized collectible exhibited by major museums around the globe.

No longer a niche hobby, comic books now represent an impressive slice of popular and commercial culture.

WHAAM!: Original Comic Drawings from the Collection features original comic book art, comic strips and sequential drawings created by some of America’s most noted comic artists, such as Bob Kane, Ernie Chan and Neil Adams, from the Huntington Museum of Art’s Michael Reynolds Collection of American Popular Culture.

This exhibit is presented by The Herald-Dispatch. This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

The opening reception for this event takes place during the June Fourth Tuesday Tour on June 23, 2015, at 7 p.m. The opening reception has a tea party theme and will include refreshments, activities, costumed characters and more. Admission is free.

Saturday KidsArt will also feature a contest related to Lewis Carroll’s “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” on June 6 and June 13, with prizes presented on June 20 at 1 p.m. at the beginning of Saturday KidsArt, which is generously sponsored by Cabell Huntington Hospital.

In mid-January 2015 the New York Times published an article titled “A Girl Turns 150, and Fans Take Note.” This, of course, is referring to Alice, of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland fame and 150 to the date since the well-known book Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (1865) was written by Charles L. Dodgson, better known to the world as Lewis Carroll. The story of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland has become part of everyone’s collective memory—through books, movies, music, or allusions to characters and places in the book (i.e. down the rabbit hole, the Mad Hatter, Cheshire Cat grin, etc.), yet most of us do not know much about the back story of Alice and the man who brought her adventures to life. The Lewis Carroll Society of North America (LCSNA), a non-profit organization dedicated to furthering study of the life and works of Carroll, is planning major celebratory exhibitions and programs across the United States to commemorate this Alice 150 event.

Locally, we will be celebrating this important sesquicentennial by presenting a selection of objects from the more than 3,500 items that make up the Lewis Carroll Collection of Victoria J. Sewell. Husband and wife team, Victoria and Byron Sewell, of Hurricane, W.Va., have spent the past 25 years building an extensive Lewis Carroll collection. The exhibit, curated by the Sewells, will include first edition and signed books, original drawings, playbills, and photographs, Alice books illustrated by various English and American illustrators, Alice books in translation and as illustrated by various illustrators around the world, parodies of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Alice in the performing arts including dance, theatrical performances, movies and music, and much more.

The exhibition will be accompanied by an annotated catalogue from Evertype which will feature an introductory essay by Dodgson biographer Edward Wakeling, who recently published a book titled Lewis Carroll: The Man and His Circle, and prefaced by the Sewells. A muchness of programming is planned in conjunction with the exhibit, including a Mad Hatter Tea Party! You can follow other Alice 150 events at lewiscarrollresources.net, or on Facebook: Alice 150: Celebrating Wonderland. For information on a free download of “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland,” click here

This exhibit is presented by HIMG.This exhibit is presented by HIMG. This exhibit is sponsored by the Huntington Mall Complex. This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Collection Wisdom: Staff Selects

March 21 - July 12, 2015

A guided tour of this exhibit takes place during the Fourth Tuesday Tour on April 28, 2015, at 7 p.m. Admission is free. Refreshments will be served. This is a Macy’s Free Tuesday event.

Out of the 15,000 works of art in the permanent collection at the Huntington Museum of Art, which work would you pick as your favorite, and why? For a series of exhibits we are calling Collection Wisdom, we are posing that question to folks who know the collection well, HMA’s staff members and Board of Trustees.

Collection Wisdom: Staff Selects offers a variety of artistic styles and media chosen by HMA staff members. Works on view will include Love Tokens by Jules Breton (French, 1827-1906), selected by HMA Registrar Linda Sanns who has been with the Museum for 34 years! Come and see what has been selected, and why, and think about your favorite work!

Sustaining Sponsors, In Support of HMA Staff

  • Carolyn Bagby
  • Gayle Cox
  • John and Harriette Cyrus
  • William and Sarah Denman
  • Robert and Joyce Levy
  • Robert Y. Csernica

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

This exhibit will tap into the Museum’s rich collection of American paintings, drawings, sculpture, prints, decorative arts, and historic firearms to explore artworks created between the first years of the American Civil War up through the end of World War II.

Most artists don’t work in a vacuum, and their works, consciously or unconsciously portray the time in which they are created. Carefully selected objects, zeitgeists if you will, that contain the spirit of the era in which they were made, and following a timeline of American history from 1861 through 1945, will be highlighted. This era, rich in national and international events, expansion and exploration of the country, and technological and industrial changes, reveals great turbulence and soul-searching in what was still a fairly young nation trying to make its mark on the world map.

On view will be a number of works created as part of the war efforts, but most will be non-war related artworks that portray the range of artistic styles and developments from reconstruction and the “Golden Age,” the romanticizing of the American West, the American expatriates and artistic study abroad in the late 19th century, and up through early American modernism, the Depression era, regionalism, and the beginnings of Abstract Expressionism in the early-to-mid-20th century. This span of time, as seen through the creations by American artists and designers, takes the viewer from a mid-19th century focus on America, a shift to European artistic styles and trends, and then back to the United States with a focus on regionalism—culminating in a clash of ideas and styles as the nation progresses toward the middle of the 20th century.

Artists featured in the exhibit include Winslow Homer, Ralph Blakelock, George Inness, Daniel Chester French, Willard Leroy Metcalf, Childe Hassam, Enoch Wood Perry, Henry Ossawa Tanner, Bessie Potter Vonnoh, Arthur Dow, Edward Robinson Leigh, Frederic Remington, Robert Henri, Abraham Walkowitz, Blanche Lazzell, Edward Hopper, Thomas Hart Benton, Peggy Bacon, Andrew Wyeth, Charles Burchfield, Berenice Abbott, John Taylor Arms, and objects manufactured by Central Glass Co., Wooten Desk Co., Mt. Washington Glass Co., Atterbury and Co., Roycroft Studios, Paden City Glass Manufacturing Co., Weller Pottery, Grueby Faience Company, Indiana Tumbler and Goblet Co., Akro Agate Glass Co., Homer Laughlin, and many others.

Created Between the Wars: American Art 1861-1945 is generously sponsored by

  • Anonymous, In Honor of Halcyon Moses’s kindness and generosity;
  • Anonymous, In Memory of Robert Hickman;
  • W.B. “Bart” Andrews, In Honor of Doris B. Andrews;
  • Adam Joseph Booth, In Memory of Jeanne Ellen Kaplan Dunn;
  • Mr. and Mrs. Bernard R. Gebhart, II, In Memory of their parents;
  • Dr. Scott and Mary Gibbs, In Memory of Mr. Fergus L. Hanson;
  • Mr. and Mrs. Earl W. Heiner, Jr.,
  • In Honor of Mr. and Mrs. Dwight Dudley and Mr. and Mrs. Richard Hensley;
  • Nancy Hoey, In Memory of Charlotte and Albert Boos;
  • Leon K. and Suzanne M. Oxley, In Honor of Kermit McGinnis;
  • Larry Queen, In Memory of Rebecca and Ryan Queen;
  • and Irene Windle, In Memory of Wayne C. Windle.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

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