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Studio Selections

May 21 - June 16, 2019

Opening reception takes place on Tuesday, May 21, at 6 p.m. This is a Macy’s Free Tuesday event.

Studio Selections is an exhibition celebrating the accomplishments of people who have participated in HMA’s studio program during the year. Classes in watercolor, painting, photography, clay and drawing are very popular at the Huntington Museum of Art.

Be sure to come and enjoy this exhibit and see what members of our region create in HMA’s studio program.

Presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Opening reception and awards ceremony will take place on Saturday, April 20 at 2 p.m.

Portfolio features the best student art created in middle schools and high schools from the Tri-State area of West Virginia, Kentucky and Ohio.

Each middle school teacher selects four works of art from his or her classes and each high school teacher selects eight.

HMA typically displays more than 200 works in Portfolio. This exhibit celebrates the hard work accomplished by teachers and students by showcasing the chosen works of art in a museum setting. Every year, a judge views
all entries and recognizes 13 outstanding students’ work. Winners receive awards and have his or her artwork posted on the museum’s website. This year’s judge is Dr. Maribea Barnes-Marsano, Professor of Art Education from the Marshall University College of Arts and Media.

Portfolio 2019 is funded by Marshall University’s College of Arts and Media.

Presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Marshall University College of Arts & Media Presents Portfolio 2019

This exhibit will be the focus of the July Tuesday Tour, which will have a disco theme on July 23 at 7 p.m. A steamroller print demonstration is scheduled for June 14 and 15 with more details to be announced soon. This exhibit will be accompanied by a catalogue.

America was a changed nation by the time peace treaties were signed to end World War II. The successful military, technological and industrial accomplishments that were achieved during the war elevated the nation to a place of unprecedented international prominence. This push toward world leadership affected many areas of American culture, including the arts. For the first time in its history, American artists found themselves to be trendsetters rather than followers, as movements such as Abstract Expressionism emerged from studios and galleries in New York and other cities and were held up as the wave of the future throughout the world. This pacesetting role continued through the remaining decades of the century, as a parade of widely varying styles gained footholds in the American art scene, ranging from Pop Art to large-scale environmental works.

The Huntington Museum of Art has a strong collection of works by American artists from the period that runs the gamut of mediums and style, and many of these works will be showcased in an exhibition that will be on view from June 15 through August 25, 2019.


The earliest example in the exhibit will be a newly acquired work by modernist sculptor Chaim Gross that was completed in 1942. The show also includes works by important abstract painters such as Robert Motherwell, Franz Kline, Cy Twombly, Frank Stella and Helen Frankenthaler. The free-ranging styles that emerged during the 1960s are represented by iconic figures such as Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Rauschenberg, Romare Bearden and Jasper Johns. From the 1970s to the end of the century, artists such as Jim Dine, Keith Haring, Chuck Close and John Baldessari pushed the boundaries of painting and printmaking. The successful emergence of American women artists during the latter half of the century can be seen in works by Judy Pfaff, Alice Neel, Kiki Smith, Lee Bontecou, Miriam Schapiro, Marisol and Carrie Mae Weems. Innovative sculpture by Alexander Calder, Harvey Littleton, Beverly Pepper and Harry Bertoia will also be on view. Thanks to the sponsorship of the Richard C. von Hess Foundation, the exhibition will be accompanied by a full-color catalogue
of the works in the show.

This exhibit is presented by the Richard C. von Hess Foundation.

Presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Presented in Memory of Women’s Art Historian Chris Petteys

Please join us for the opening reception for this exhibit on March 3, 2019, from 2 to 4 p.m. with Martha R. Severens, former curator of the Greenville County Museum of Art and longtime collaborator with The Johnson Collection, presenting The Dr. Lawrence B. and Shirley Gang Memorial Lecture on Central to Their Lives, an exhibit of artwork by women artists of the South, borrowed from The Johnson Collection, Spartanburg, South Carolina. Martha R. Severens is the author of several books, including “The Charleston Renaissance” and “Andrew Wyeth: America’s Painter.”

“Art is central to my life. Not being able to make or see art would be a major deprivation.” ~ Nell Blaine (1922–1996)

Nell Blaine’s assertion about the centrality—the essentiality—of art to her life has a particular resonance. The Virginia painter’s creative path began early and, over the course of her life, she overcame significant barriers in her quest to make and see art, including serious vision problems, polio, and paralysis. And then, there was her gender. Growing up in the South, the expectations for a young woman probably did not include a career as a professional artist. In that society, Blaine noted, art was often considered “a genteel thing, prissy, and somewhat bland.”

Most Southern women were steered toward more domestic pursuits, and many talented women artists abandoned their creative endeavors once they married. Some, however, broke free of societal expectations to become successful painters, sculptors, and printmakers. Many moved to large urban areas such as New York City, but others remained in the South and pursued their passions, becoming influential teachers and exhibiting artists.

Spanning the decades between the late 1890s and early 1960s, this exhibition examines the particularly complex challenges female artists confronted in a traditionally conservative region during a period in which women’s social, cultural, and political roles were being redefined and reinterpreted.

How did the variables of historical gender norms, educational barriers, race, regionalism, sisterhood, suffrage, and modernism mitigate and motivate women seeking expression on canvas or in clay?

Whether working from dedicated studio spaces, in spare rooms at home, or on the world stage, the artists showcased made remarkable contributions by fostering future generations of artists through instruction, incorporating new aesthetics into the fine arts, and challenging the status quo.

Located in Spartanburg, South Carolina, the Johnson Collection seeks to illuminate the rich history and diverse cultures of the American South. With holdings that offer an extensive survey of artistic activity from the late 18th century to the present day, the collection works to advance interest in the dynamic role that the art of the South plays in the larger context of American art and to contribute to the canon of art historical literature.

This exhibit is presented In Memory of Women’s Art Historian Chris Petteys.

Presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture, and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Opening reception takes place on March 3, 2019, from 2 to 4 p.m. Admission is free.

As a companion to the exhibition Central to Their Lives: Southern Women Artists in the Johnson Collection, the Huntington Museum of Art will feature a show titled Women Artists of the Mountain State, drawn from the museum’s permanent collection.

Though the rural nature of the state often limited the opportunities that were available for aspiring artists, whether male or female, there are nevertheless several notable West Virginia women who achieved success as professional artists. Chief among them is Blanche Lazzell, a Morgantown native whose woodblock prints and paintings are renowned for their modernist style.

Edith Lake Wilkinson, from Wheeling, was Lazzell’s contemporary in the rich artistic community in Provincetown, Massachusetts, in the early 20th century, where she produced a small but finely crafted body of work.

Many others worked in the colleges and universities in West Virginia, including June Kilgore at Marshall University, Grace Martin Frame Taylor at Morris Harvey College/University of Charleston and Paula Clendenin at West Virginia State University. Some assisted with the founding of art centers and museums in the state, such as Katherine Burnside with the Parkersburg Art Center and Olga Thabet at the Huntington Galleries (later Huntington Museum of Art). Their rich contributions to the state’s culture have inspired and enriched the lives of countless West Virginians, and recognition for their efforts is long overdue.

This exhibit is presented in Memory of Women’s Art Historian Chris Petteys.

Presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture, and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Sarah Amos will speak about her work in a free public presentation at the Huntington Museum of Art on May 16, 2019, at 7 p.m. A reception follows. The artist will present a three-day workshop at HMA titled “Image Weaving with the Multi Plate Collagraph Technique” from May 17-19, 2019, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call (304) 529-2701 for workshop fee information.

Born in Melbourne, Australia, Sarah Amos studied at the Phillip Institute of Technology in Melbourne and earned her MFA from the Vermont Studio Center/Johnson State College. She is a Tamarind Institute-trained Master Printer, and is represented in corporate, public and private collections nationally and internationally including the Time Warner Collection, New York; the Dartmouth- Hitchcock Permanent Collection, New Hampshire; and La Trobe University Museum, Melbourne. In addition to her active artistic practice, Amos teaches at Dartmouth University, Hanover, New Hampshire.

A self-described “visual archaeologist,” Sarah Amos creates dynamic, multi-layered prints, drawings and textile works that combine impressions of the external world with the personal experience of memory. These often-large-scale abstracted explorations of form and pattern call to mind the textiles found in indigenous and ancient cultures. Amos is inspired by the psychological power inherent in ritual and ceremonial masks from Africa, Asia and, particularly, the American Mardi-Gras Indians who wear flamboyant, hand-crafted full-body costumes. She is fascinated by the concept of embellishment as both physical and emotional camouflage.

The artist will discuss his work during a free public presentation at HMA on March 7, 2019, at 7 p.m. The artist will facilitate a three-day workshop at HMA titled “Slab Construction and Textured Surfaces” on March 8-10, 2019. Call (304) 529-2701 for workshop fee information.

Jeff Shapiro (b. 1949, NY) studied ceramic arts while living in Japan for almost a decade. He has exhibited his work internationally and is represented in numerous museum collections around the world, including The Carlo Zauli Museum, Faenza, Italy; The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and The Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, New York. He has led workshops in many countries and built two wood fire kilns in Italy. Shapiro lives and works in upstate New York with his wife, Hinako.

Jeff Shapiro is both a master potter and a master storyteller, with as many insightful and humorous anecdotes as technical and aesthetic thoughts. He has an extensive background in Japanese ceramic techniques and works in a variety of genres, from sake cups and tea bowls to abstract sculpture and large-scale works. His unique ceramic style fuses traditional and contemporary visions and is characterized by a combination of elegance and handmade earthiness. Shapiro embraces natural irregularities that emerge through his process. “I respond to the beauty that exists in the imperfections of nature,” writes Shapiro. “A torn leaf, a crack in a cement wall, a twisted branch, a shaft of lightning cutting through the night sky – all have the potential to be dimensions of beauty that feed the artistic soul and creative process.”

THIS EXHIBIT WILL NOT BE ON VIEW FROM FEB. 13-17, 2019, AS WE PREPARE FOR THE 2019 MUSEUM BALL ON FEB. 16, 2019, AND DE-INSTALL THE EVENT ON FEB. 17, 2019.

The artist will present a free public presentation about his work on March 21, 2019, at 7 p.m. at HMA. The artist will facilitate a three-day workshop at HMA titled “Drawing From Our Mind And Through Our Eyes” on March 22-24, 2019. Call (304) 529-2701 for workshop fee information.

Jason Bard Yarmosky was born in New York in 1987 and began drawing as a child. He graduated with a BFA from the School of Visual Arts in New York City in 2010. His paintings and drawings have been exhibited and collected internationally. His work has been featured in Juxtapoz, Hi-Fructose, and numerous publications around the world. He is a past winner of the Elizabeth Greenshields Award. Yarmosky lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

Yarmosky pushes the conceptual boundaries of traditional portrait painting and drawing by focusing on aging subjects in contrast to the historical glorification of youth. His artistic work, both classically rendered and theatrically composed, examines the complexities of the aging experience and explores questions of memory, time, and mortality revealed in the tension between the physical and psychological transformations endured by his subjects.

Camden Park Presents Art on a Limb

November 20 - January 6, 2019

Please join us for Camden Park Presents Holiday Open House on Sunday, December 2, 2018, from 1 to 4 p.m. The event features holiday music and dance performances, a visit from Santa Claus, holiday shopping in the Museum Gift Shop, refreshments and children’s art activities. Admission is free, but please bring warm clothes for the Cridlin Food & Clothing Pantry and nonperishable food for the Facing Hunger Foodbank.

In celebration of the holiday season, area artists and artist groups apply their skills and share their talents to decorate trees throughout the museum. In the Virginia Van Zandt Great Hall, at the entrance of the museum, is the 12-foot tall Palette Tree. This tree is decorated with artist palettes. Each palette is hand-decorated by a different artist in that artist’s unique style. Altogether there are more than 50 one-of-a-kind palettes on this tree.

Throughout the museum, in different gallery spaces, there are additional trees. Each one of these trees is decorated with ornaments from an area artist group. Ornaments from Woodworkers & Woodturners decorate one tree. At the end of the Virginia Van Zandt Great Hall is the Folk Art tree. The West Virginia Bead Society decorates the tree in HMA’s Glass Gallery, which is presented by Cabell Huntington Hospital. The Tri-Area Needle Arts members decorate the tree at the end of the Bridge Gallery. In front of the window at the far end of the Daywood Gallery is the tree decorated by the Western Weavers Guild of the West Virginia Basketmakers. Finally, at the entrance to the Daine Gallery is the tree decorated by the Calligraphers Guild.

The Daywood Collection

September 29 - February 3, 2019

This exhibit will be in the spotlight during the November Tuesday Tour on November 27, 2018, at 7 p.m. This is a Macy’s Free Tuesday event.

Some of the artists represented in the exhibit include Childe Hassam, Gari Melchers, Frank W. Benson, Robert Henri and Howard Somerville, whose painting Joyce is one of the most beloved by Museum Members in HMA’s permanent collection of more than 15,000 objects.

Arthur S. Dayton (1887-1948), and Ruth Woods Dayton (1894-1978) compiled The Daywood Collection and Mrs. Dayton donated the collection of more than 300 works of art to HMA in December 1966.

This exhibit is presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

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