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Past

Don Pendleton speaks at HMA about his work on April 10, 2014, at 7 p.m. Admission is free. Refreshments will be served. Pendleton will conduct a workshop titled Fine Lines: The Art of Skateboard Graphics on April 11-14, 2014, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call (304) 529-2701 for workshop fee information or to register. Pendleton returns to HMA for a Skateboarding Demo on May 17 from 2 to 5 p.m. Admission is free. The rain date for this event is May 18 from 2 to 5 p.m. Participants younger than 18 must wear helmets and have written parental permission to participate. Parents must be present to sign permission forms.

Don Pendleton is an American artist, designer, illustrator and writer whose legendary skateboard graphics define the visual identity of one of the fastest-growing sports in the world. Born and raised in Ravenswood, W.Va., Pendleton grew up watching his father paint, and embraced drawing at the age of nine. He discovered skateboarding five years later, attracted to the highly visual culture and its emphasis on creativity. Mutually intertwined, these twin passions offered an escape from youthful boredom and fueled Pendleton for years to come.

As a sponsored skateboarder, Pendleton quickly moved through the amateur ranks, competing and doing demos throughout the Midwest and East Coast until an ankle injury in 1992 shifted his focus back to artwork. He earned a bachelor’s degree in graphic arts with a minor in sociology from Marshall University in 1994. Pendleton took all of the art jobs he could find in an effort to build his portfolio. During the mid-‘90s, he developed much of his current style while working at several newspapers and publications, focusing on layout, design and illustration. He landed a coveted position of in-house graphic artist and designer for Alien Workshop in 1998 – then a burgeoning skateboard and apparel company where creativity and originality were paramount. He spent the better part of a decade establishing the company’s visual identity, and Alien Workshop quickly became one of the most popular skateboard companies in the world. From 2005-2009, Pendleton spearheaded the creative and marketing team of skateboarding giant, Element Skateboards, from his home base in Dayton, Ohio. He is currently a freelance commercial and fine artist whose client list includes Zero Skateboards, LG Electronics, Mountain Dew, Gatorade, Pearl Jam, Nike 6.0, and DC Shoes, among many others.

Pendleton’s paintings, prints and design work have been exhibited in group and solo shows around the globe, and featured in magazines such as Juxtapoz, Transworld, The Skateboard Mag, and other print and online publications. He has also participated in many live painting events throughout the U.S. and Europe. In 2009, a documentary film titled, “Little Giants” chronicled his life and work. When not traveling, Pendleton can be found painting in his studio, riding his skateboard, or in front of a computer working on graphics for his recently resurrected company, Darkroom.

This exhibit is generously presented by Paris Signs and sponsored by Bulldog Creative Services.

The Walter Gropius Master Artist Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition, as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

Barbizon Paintings

October 26 - June 29, 2014

The artists of the Barbizon School differed in age, working technique, artistic background, and lifestyle. The Barbizon School was not an official art academy, but rather an association that serendipitously formed beginning in the 1820s in the Forest of Fontainebleau, and the many hamlets surrounding the forest – especially the small town of Barbizon. At the time, the Forest of Fontainebleau was a dense forest of 42,000 acres. A number of artists took up residence there, some year-round, many just for the summer. All came to escape the city and its encroaching industrialized society. These artists included Théodore Rousseau, Jean-Françoise Millet, Narcisse Diaz de la Pena, Camille Corot, Charles-Françoise Daubigny and many others who concentrated on landscape and scenes of rural life. Collectively these artistic pioneers championed landscape painting at a time when the French art academies and the official salon did not.

Artists of the Barbizon School were particularly admired by American collectors, and were a particular favorite of one of the Museum’s founders, Herbert Fitzpatrick. In 1952 he donated more than 25 important paintings by artists of the Barbizon School. In subsequent years, other area collectors have generously added to this legacy collection, including Mary H. Resener, Dr. and Mrs. Don H. Titus, and Dr. John and Amber Haid. These French artists who pioneered painting out-of-doors greatly influenced, and were eventually eclipsed by a younger generation of artists – the impressionists.

This exhibit is generously sponsored by the Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment; West Virginia Division of Culture and History; and National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

An awards ceremony and reception for this exhibit will take place on Sunday, June 29, 2014, from 1 to 3 p.m.

For the second time, Allied Artists of West Virginia, Inc. a non-profit, educational and cultural association whose mission is to encourage, nurture and present the work of West Virginia artists to the community, will hold its biennial juried exhibition at the Huntington Museum of Art. Since approximately 1934, when two small art organizations combined efforts, Allied Artists of West Virginia has encouraged artists to show their work, has fostered the development of new works, and furthered artistic interests in the community.

Interested West Virginia artists 18 and older can download the prospectus from the Allied Artists of West Virginia website. Entries must be postmarked by March 30, 2014. Juror for the exhibit is artist/teacher Benjy Davies, Chair, and Associate Professor, School of Fine Arts, University of Rio Grande.

The film “Kinngait: Riding Light into the World” will be presented at 7 p.m. May 27, 2014, during the May Fourth Tuesday Tour. Admission is free as part of Macy’s Free Tuesdays.

North of Sixty refers to the circle of latitude that is 60 degrees north of the earth’s equatorial plane. In Canada, the 60thparallel forms a boundary between the northern territories of Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut, and the western provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba to the south.

Forty prints selected from the collection of The Richard F. Brush Gallery, St. Lawrence University, Canton, New York offer a distinct portrait of Inuit life and culture in the Canadian Arctic. These works will be on view in conjunction with the concurrent exhibition titledExcavations from the Vault: Herman Dean and the Hudson Bay. Inuit printmaking as we know it today dates back to 1957 when James Houston, a young European-Canadian, helped to create a cooperative graphic arts workshop in Cape Dorset, located in the northeast Canadian Arctic and part of what is now the recently created territory of Nunavut. Cape Dorset artists are well known for stone carvings and stone-cut prints, as well as lithographs, stencil prints, and etchings. Artists from several generations portray the power and beauty of the natural world, as well as town and camp life, traditional Inuit stories and mythic creatures, and, more recently, influences from the south. Living in such a harsh environment, these artists pay close attention to and respect the forces of nature, but their work also illustrates at times a certain lyricism in the portrayal of humans and animals with their surroundings.

Among the best-known Inuit artists are Pudlo Pudlat (1916-1992), Kenojuak Ashevak (1927 - 2013), Kananginak Pootoogook (1935 - 2010), and Kavavaow Mannomee (born 1958). Pudlo was one of the first Inuit artists to explore nontraditional subject matter; a number of his prints feature airplanes and helicopters, and others show animals interacting in unexpected and sometimes humorous situations. Kenojuak’s prints often depict birds, such as loons, geese, owls, gulls, and ravens, woven fluidly together in elaborate designs and bright colors. Many of her prints depict human and animal transformation figures. Kenojuak has received several notable honors and awards from arts museums, universities and colleges, and the Canadian government. Kananginak is well known for his prints of hunting, fishing, and Arctic wildlife, such as caribou, polar bears, and seals. Younger artists such as Kavavaow are now expanding upon traditional themes in their work, with images depicting ATVs, television sets, and other commercial and material items from the south.

This exhibit is presented by The Macy’s Foundation and generously sponsored by The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment; West Virginia Division of Culture and History; and National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Jeanne Quinn will speak about her work at 7 p.m. May 15, 2014, at HMA. Admission is free. A reception follows. Jeanne Quinn will conduct a three-day workshop at HMA titled “Line Into Form” from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 16-18, 2014. Call (304) 529-2701 for workshop fee information or to register.

Jeanne Quinn received a Bachelor of Arts degree cum laude in 1988 from Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio, where she studied art history and baroque music performance. Unsure how to resolve these two interests, after graduating she apprenticed to a woodworker in Tennessee and later to a violinmaker in Italy. Upon returning to the U.S., she got a job in Boston making flutes – an enjoyable position, but one that valued craft over creativity. Quinn desired to invent her own forms, although, like musical instruments, function and a relationship to the human body remained important considerations. She took ceramics classes at a community center and quickly realized clay’s potential for invention, as well as its deep, functional connection to the human body. Following post-baccalaureate study at the University of Colorado at Boulder with renowned ceramicist, Betty Woodman, she earned a Master of Fine Arts degree in 1995 from the University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.

Jeanne Quinn has exhibited widely, including the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Colorado; Robischon Gallery, Denver, Colorado; Grimmerhus Museum, Denmark; Formargruppen Gallery, Malmö, Sweden; Sculpturens Hus, Stockholm, Sweden; and the Taipei County Yingge Ceramics Museum, Taipei, Taiwan. She has been a resident artist at the MacDowell Colony, the Archie Bray Foundation, the International Ceramic Center in Denmark, the Kahla Porcelain Factory, and the Ceramic Center-Berlin in Germany. Her work is published in books such as The Artful Teapot by Garth Clark; Postmodern Ceramics, by Mark Del Vecchio; Sex Pots by Paul Matthieu; A Ceramic Continuum: Fifty Years of the Archie Bray Influence by Peter Held, and Confrontational Ceramics by Judith Schwartz. She has lectured at numerous institutions including Alfred University, Kansas City Art Institute, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, University of Minnesota, among others. Quinn is an Associate Professor in the Department of Art and Art History at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Quinn is renowned for hybrid works that combine porcelain in dynamic dialogue with unexpected mediums. In Floating, Quinn examines material culture through the disrupting lens of installation art. Based on an 18th century Italian lace pattern, the installation alludes to the history of decorative arts. It is also a porcelain chandelier that references multiples, materiality, and the human body. By suspending hundreds of precisely arranged ceramic objects, Quinn pushes ornament into space, isolating and celebrating that which is usually thought of as flat, superficial embellishment. The scale envelops, suggesting the softness and movement of textiles. Space itself becomes the place of decoration; the installation, a stage; the viewer, an actor.

The Walter Gropius Master Artist Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition, as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

Most of us know Wayne County, West Virginia, native Herman P. Dean (1897-1978) for his impressive collection of historic firearms which he donated to the Huntington Museum of Art beginning in 1953, forming one of the most treasured legacy collections of the institution. Herman Dean also loved to travel, and was an active sportsman, and a prolific writer. A book titled Travel Notes written in 1957 includes a section he called Eskimoland which chronicles his travels in the Arctic. Today the area is known as Nunatsiavut (Northern coastal Labrador), Nunavik (Northern Quebec), and the territory of Nunavut and the Inuvialuit region (Northwest Territories). In 1950 Dean traveled aboard theM.V. Rupertsland, a Canadian trading vessel registered to the Hudson Bay Company. Embarking from Montreal, Dean sailed up the St. Lawrence River, through the Straits of Belle Island, up the coast of Labrador to Port Burwell on the Northern tip, and into the Hudson Bay. The Hudson Bay Company was engaged in trade with the Inuit People along the coasts of Northern Quebec and Baffin Island and Dean visited many of the ports and villages including George’s River, Ft. Chimo, Payne Bay, Sugluk, Cape Smith, Povungnituk, Churchill, Southampton Island, Cape Dorset, Repulse Bay, Igloolik, Chesterfield, Baker Lake, Lake Harbor, Frobisher Bay, and Paugnirtung. Dean mentions in Travel Notes that “It was my privilege to be the first white man to set foot on the soil at Povungnituk, with the exception of H.B.C. (Hudson Bay Company) personnel.”

On this trip, Dean took more than 400 photographs depicting the Inuit Peoples; sea ice and coastal landscape views; staff of the Hudson Bay Company posts; and crew on the M.V. Rupertsland. During this trip and during other adventures in the Arctic regions, Dean collected art and artifacts created by Inuit artists, including items made for trade such as figural stone and ivory sculptures, and hand woven, decorated baskets, as well as ivory objects used in everyday life such as a knive, snow goggles, and fish hooks. These items were a bequest from Herman Dean’s Estate to the Museum in 1978. A selection of photographs (which have never before been on view), and sculptures will be presented in Gallery Three.

This exhibit is sponsored In Memory of Jim Hollandsworth; Bob and Barbara Kress Bias, In Memory of Herman P. Dean; the Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment; West Virginia Division of Culture and History; and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Tri-State Arts Association

September 6 - October 5, 2014

The Tri-State Arts Association, in conjunction with the Museum, will present this biennial exhibition that promotes the work of artists living and working in West Virginia, Kentucky and Ohio. A variety of media will be represented, including painting, drawing, photography, ceramics, sculpture, glass, wood, textiles, and mixed-media. Interested artists can download the prospectus from the TSAA website. Questions can be directed to Libby Varner at (606) 465-5305.

The Tri-State Arts Association has been in existence since 1953. The association was formed “to encourage and promote a public interest in and understanding of all schools of art, and to create and develop a closer relationship between art and the community.” The Huntington Museum of Art has been showcasing work by members of the Tri-State Arts Association since 1959.

Handwriting is a visual spatial activity and fosters creativity. When we write, we’re not only memorizing the letters on the paper but also the process and the experience of shaping them. Writing by hand allows a feeling of focused peacefulness. A group in our area that has concentrated on the art and techniques of beautiful handwriting for 30 years will be the focus of this exhibit in the Museum’s Bridge Gallery from July 12 – October 12, 2014. The Huntington Calligraphers’ Guild was established in September of 1984. Since the beginning, and still today, the group has held monthly meetings in the studios of the Huntington Museum of Art. This partnership is being celebrated with this display of 20 to 30 works.

Walter Gropius Master Artist Linn Meyers will speak about her work at 7 p.m. September 11, 2014, at HMA. Admission is free. A reception follows. Linn Meyers will facilitate a three-day workshop from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. September 12-14, 2014. Call (304) 529-2701 for workshop fee information.

This exhibit by Linn Meyers is titled Unintended Consequences, including collaborative works with Anne Seidman; Beverly Ress; Luis Silva; Rachel Farbiarz; Heidi Lau; Nancy White; Gary Gissler; and Elena Del Rivero.

Time is central to the work of Washington, DC-based artist, Linn Meyers, whose practice centers upon the intimacy and directness of drawing. Each dense and intricate ink line drawing is the result of a nearly meditative process by which Meyers lays down consecutive lines into largely organic forms, creating rhythmic repetitive patterns. Meyers’s layering of vivid colors creates a shimmering quality suggestive of light and movement across the surface of the work. Working in a range of scales, Meyers has in recent years moved from the page to creating site-specific wall drawings. Ambitious in scale and labor, these drawings can take several weeks to complete, their shapes responding to the architecture of the space and the surrounding elements.

Meyers completed a BFA at The Cooper Union, New York, NY, and earned an MFA from California College of the Arts, San Francisco, CA. Meyers has had solo shows at the American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center, Washington, DC; The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC; The University of Maryland, College Park; G Fine Art, Washington, DC; Margaret Thatcher Projects, New York; Gallery Joe, Philadelphia; and Westmoreland Museum of American Art, Greensburg. Meyers has also participated in several international group shows including the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Art, Tokyo and Paris Concret, Paris. She has received numerous awards including the Smithsonian Artist Research Fellowship, Artist-in-Residence at the San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art, Artist-in-Residence at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Artist-in-Residence at the Tamarind Institute, the Trawick Award, Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant, Excellence in Drawing Award from The Cooper Union, Artist-in-Residence at the Bronx Council on the Arts, and the Alex Katz Scholarship to Skowhegan. Meyers currently lives and works in Washington, DC.

The Walter Gropius Master Artist Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition, as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

Walter Gropius Master Artist Albert Pfarr will speak about his work at 7 p.m. September 25, 2014. Admission to the public presentation is free. A reception follows. He will facilitate a three-day workshop from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. September 26-28, 2014. For workshop fee information, call (304) 529-2701.

Brooklyn-based ceramist Albert Pfarr is known for large-scale, free-standing ceramic sculptures composed of hundreds of interconnecting and interchangeable parts that draw inspiration from patterns of construction in both nature and technology. Using a peg-and-hole fabrication technique, Pfarr inserts a variable combination of earthenware spines, flanges and loops into a cylindrical terra cotta core. The resulting non-representational forms “bloom” and develop organically, spontaneously, as he carefully balances and counterweights the numerous components. His assemblages are modular: each contains potential elements of the next, to be recycled into new objects in entirely different configurations. The scale and sheer physicality of Pfarr’s work can be intimidating and otherworldly, yet the familiar resemblance to oversized toys, models of molecular structures, or three-dimensional doodles engages and delights the viewer.

Albert Pfarr received a Bachelor of Arts from the State University of New York – Potsdam in 1984. Following post-baccalaureate study at the University of Massachusetts – Amherst, he earned a Master of Fine Arts degree in 1990 from the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University. Pfarr has received numerous awards, research grants, fellowships and residencies, both stateside and abroad. In 2005, he was one of six national Emerging Artists chosen by the National Council for Education of Ceramic Arts. The following year, he was selected as the NCECA Artist-in-Residence for a six-week residency at the Guldagergaard International Ceramic Research Center in Denmark. Pfarr’s work is represented in numerous private and public collections such as the Daum Museum of Contemporary Art, Sedalia, Missouri; the Archie Bray Foundation, Helena, Montana; and the John Michael Kohler Arts Center, Sheboygan, Wisconsin. His work has been featured in The New York Times, Ceramics Monthly, and American Craft, among others. Since 2007, Pfarr has managed the education and studio operations of Greenwich House Pottery, an internationally recognized center for ceramics in New York, N.Y.

The Walter Gropius Master Artist Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition, as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

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