Past

The Closing Reception for The Art of Teaching Art: Marshall University Visual Art Faculty Show takes place on January 31, 2014, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Admission is free. Refreshments will be served. The exhibit is scheduled to run at HMA from November 23, 2013, through Feb. 2, 2014.

This fall, the Huntington Museum of Art and the visual arts faculty from the Marshall University College of Arts and Media (formerly called the College of Fine Arts) will join hands to present The Art of Teaching Art. At the time of this writing, twenty-one artists plan to participate in the show, including both full-time and adjunct professors. Media represented will range from sculpture, drawing, prints, paintings, textiles, and video/animation.

The College of Arts and Media is on the eve of an exciting year of changes. Construction is under way converting the building that once held the former Stone & Thomas Department Store on 3rdAvenue (across from Pullman Square) into a state-of-the-art Visual Arts Center. When renovations are complete (slated for fall 2014), the center will house studios, labs and classrooms on the upper floors, and retail and gallery space on the ground floor. Come to see the creativity alive and well on campus, in central downtown Huntington, and up on the hill.

This exhibit is generously sponsored by the Marshall University College of Arts and Media; the Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment; West Virginia Division of Culture and History; and National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Opening event takes place at 7 p.m. November 2, 2013, with a concert by Simon Shaheen. A reception follows sponsored by Melanie Mansour in Memory of Michael Mansour. Admission is free.

The November Tuesday Tour takes place at 7 p.m. November 26, 2013, with a Gallery Walk led by Dr. Clay McNearney and Dr. Jeff Ruff, both of Marshall University’s Department of Religious Studies.

The Huntington Museum of Art, in an exclusive partnership with the Telfair Museums in Savannah, Georgia, brings you the exhibit Visions of the Prophet: The Visual Art of Kahlil Gibran This collection of works by the Lebanese-born, visionary artist and writer Kahlil Gibran (1883-1931) includes 96 drawings, watercolors, and paintings. Beloved worldwide for his writings, his visual art is less known, ironic since it was visual art that he pursued first. Gibran is best known for his book titled The Prophet, a collection of 26 philosophical essays that became one of the top-selling books of the twentieth century. Since it was first published in 1923,The Prophet has never been out of print, and has been translated into 40 languages. The book was especially popular during the 1960s with followers of the American counterculture and New Age movements.

Inspired by painters from the Renaissance, the Pre-Raphaelites, the French Symbolists, and others, such as visionary William Blake, Gibran sought to express symbolic ideas about life, humanity, and the interconnectedness of all things in his own unique way. These works span his career and include early works from his first exhibition at photographer Fred Holland Day’s studio in Boston in 1904, to works created during the last years of his life, including six works used as illustrations in his last book The Garden of the Prophet. All the pieces on view come from the personal collection of Gibran’s patron Mary Haskell who donated her collection to the Telfair Museums in 1950. They provide a survey of Gibran’s career as a visual artist, document his relationship with Mary Haskell, and substantiate his literary career with examples of several drawings and watercolors used as illustrations for six of his English-written books. The exhibit also includes self-portraits by Gibran, an early oil portrait of Gibran by Lilla Cabot Perry and photographs of Gibran and his New York studio.

Tania Sammons, Curator at the Telfair Museums, and organizer of this exhibit has written extensively about Mary Haskell and Kahlil Gibran. She writes the following about the work of Gibran, “Through oil, watercolor, pencil, pen, pastel, gouache, or some variation thereof, Gibran sought to evoke the essence of life. He wanted to elevate humanity through his work and share his ideas about the connectedness of all things. He wanted to inspire and stretch the imaginations of his audiences, if they so choose to be open to his message of oneness. In his visual work and his writing, Gibran provided a first step into a spiritual understanding of life.”

The exhibit will be accompanied by a catalogue with essays by Tania Sammons and Dr. Suheil Bushrui, the University of Maryland’s George and Lisa Zakhem Kahlil Gibran Chair for Values and Peace.

This exhibit is generously sponsored by Jean E. Ripley; American Task Force for Lebanon; Joseph Assaley and Renee Domanico; The Edmund George Family; Dr. & Mrs. Lee C. Haikal; George and Gloria Hanna; The Herald-Dispatch; Kfeirian Reunion Foundation, Inc.; Margaret Mary Layne in Memory of Tom Sadler;Melanie Mansour in Memory of Michael Mansour; Marshall University Division of Multicultural Affairs; Edward M. Rahal; Dr. Richard and Eleanor Rashid; Mr. and Mrs. Andrew K. Teeter; Joseph and Omayma Touma; Larry and Cheryl Tweel in Memory of James A. Tweel and in Honor of Sally R. Tweel; West Virginia Division of Culture and History; & National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

This program is presented with support from the West Virginia Department of Education and the Arts.

In 2008, the Huntington Museum of Art was selected as the sole institution in the state of West Virginia to receive a gift of 50 works of art from New York collectors Dorothy and Herbert Vogel, with the help of the National Gallery of Art, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The gifts to HMA are part of a larger, national gifts program titled The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States, which has distributed 2,500 works from the Vogels’ collection of contemporary art throughout the nation, with 50 works going to a selected art institution in each of the 50 states. The best-known aspects of the Vogel Collection are minimal and conceptual art, but the works donated to HMA also explore numerous directions of the post-minimalist period, including works of a figurative and expressionist nature.

The Vogel Collection has become characterized as unique among collections of contemporary art, both for the character and breadth of the objects and for the individuals who created it. Herbert Vogel (1922-2012), spent most of his working life as an employee of the United States Postal Service, and Dorothy Vogel (b. 1935), was a reference librarian at the Brooklyn Public Library. Setting their collecting priorities above those of personal comfort, the couple used Dorothy’s salary to cover the expenses of daily life and devoted Herbert’s salary to the acquisition of contemporary art. They spent their free time attending art openings, and getting to know young artists whose work interested them. Usually they purchased work directly from the artists themselves, and continued to follow the careers of artists they supported. Their one bedroom apartment became legendary; so full of art it was close to becoming uninhabitable for lack of space.

To view the collection and learn more about the Vogels, go to http://vogel5050.org.

Fifty Works for Fifty States is a joint initiative of the Trustees of the Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection and the National Gallery of Art, with the generous support of the National Endowment for the Arts and the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

This exhibition is made possible, in part, by grants from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts. Additional support is provided by the Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

Courtyard Series: Aaron Kent: Bones

October 26 - March 16, 2014

This will be the second sculpture exhibit, part of an ongoing series in the Virginia Cavendish Courtyard, which presents work by emerging artists from the region. This fall an installation titled Bones by Cincinnati-based artist Aaron Kent will be on view. Kent graduated with a BFA in sculpture from the Art Academy of Cincinnati, and then worked for seven years at Casting Arts and Technology in Cincinnati, gaining practical experience in mold making, bronze casting, and metal fabrication. Kent works in other media as well, especially printmaking, painting and performance art. In 2011 he established DIY Printing, one of the few artist run printmaking co-ops in Cincinnati. His latest sculpture series titled Bones, reflects on death and the body’s spiritual connection to the circle of life. In a statement about the series he wrote:

Bones are symbolic of death and our mortality. They are the last things left of any human or animal. In many societies bones are connected with religious beliefs, secret societies and sometimes evil. Often people think of them as grotesque and are repelled by the sight of them, whether real or in art. In fact, bones are the basis of our bodies, the structure that supports it, and they become the reminders of a life after the rest of the body has decomposed.

In creating the Bones series of sculptures, I hope to expand the symbolism of bones. I want to connect them to life and nature and to demonstrate the gift given back to nature. It was and still is important for people to connect the cycle of life with bones and to realize their beauty and gift to the earth. In order to create this message it is important to take the sculptures out of the galleries and place them in settings where they might normally be found.

- ;Aaron Kent

This exhibit is generously sponsored by the Katherine & Herman Pugh Exhibitions Endowment; West Virginia Division of Culture and History; and National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Courtyard Series: Aaron Kent: Bones

Art created by non-academic artists has always been hard to characterize – and perhaps that is a good thing. There have never been clear-cut lines in art especially in the areas of craft, illustration, photography, vernacular furniture, and so on. Art historians are quick to categorize with “isms” and “idioms.” Art that doesn’t fit concisely into these labels can often be new and refreshing.

Whatever the label, there is a rich tradition (of what we will call folk art, for simplicity’s sake), in the Appalachian region. The permanent collection of the Huntington Museum of Art includes more than 200 outstanding examples of paintings, drawings, sculpture, textiles and “eccentric” or vernacular furniture by self-taught artists including Edgar and Donny Tolson, Shields Landon Jones, Garland and Minnie Adkins, Dilmus Hall, Evan Decker, Charlie Kinney, Linvel Barker, Jimmy Lee Sudduth, “The Baltimore Glass Man”, Reverend Howard Finster and others.

The bulk of this rich collection is made up of works created by artists from Kentucky, West Virginia, and other Southern Appalachian states. Most of these were acquired by the Museum in the 1980s and 1990s, and the Museum is still adding to this collection. A number of these artists, including Evan Decker, S.L. Jones, Minnie Adkins, and Charley and Noah Kinney are represented by a large numbers of objects.

The collection also has many excellent 19thcentury folk art examples of paintings, sculpture and textiles, including works by Sala Bosworth, Susannah F. Nicholson, Asa Ames, and Eliza Isabella Means Seaton, which will also be part of the exhibition.

This exhibit is generously sponsored by the Katherine & Herman Pugh Exhibitions Endowment; Robert D. Olson In Honor of Barack Obama, for Fulfilling the American Dream; and West Virginia Division of Culture and History; and National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Studio Selections

April 22 - April 27, 2014

Studio Selections is a celebration!

The opening reception for this exhibit takes place from 6 to 7 p.m. April 22, 2014.

Every spring HMA’s classes and workshop participants exhibit their work in HMA’s Virginia Van Zandt Great Hall. This is a great occasion for artists to display the work they have accomplished during the year. Classes offered at HMA include pottery, photography, drawing, water color and Photoshop®.

Studio Selections

Hung Liu will speak about her work at 7 p.m. March 27, 2014. Admission is free. A reception follows. Hung Liu will conduct a three-day workshop at HMA titled ” Self-Portraits and Selfies” from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 28-30, 2014. Call (304) 529-2701 for workshop fee information or to register.

Hung Liu currently lives in Oakland, California, and is a tenured professor of painting at Mills College. She has received numerous awards, grants and recognitions throughout her career, including two Painting Fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts. Her work has been exhibited around the world and resides in the permanent collections of many prestigious institutions, including Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art and Design, Kansas City, Missouri; Los Angeles County Museum of Art, California; National Museum of American Art, Washington, D.C.; Oakland Museum of California; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, California; San Jose Museum of Art, California; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota; The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among many others. She is represented by multiple prominent galleries, including the Nancy Hoffman Gallery, New York, New York.

One of the first Chinese artists to study in the United States, Hung Liu is widely regarded for a vast and innovative body of highly evocative paintings, murals, drawings, printmaking and installation. Characterized by the expressive, painterly effects of Western Modernism and Chinese decorative motifs, her work is richly layered. She frequently references anonymous historical photographs of China and, with deft technique, breathes new life into individuals lost in the sweep of history, particularly Chinese women, children, refugees, peasants, prostitutes and soldiers. In essence, Liu turns old photographs into new paintings, liberated from the rigid methodology of socialist realism – the style in which she was trained – by merging both Eastern and Western traditions. Over the years, Liu has incorporated more and more paint drips into her work, achieved by thinning the pigments with linseed oil. Gravity, her “sacred collaborator”, pulls the paint downward and divides the composition in interesting, unpredictable ways. This effect simultaneously unifies and dissolves the photo-based imagery, suggesting the passage of memory into history.

The Walter Gropius Master Artist Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition, as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

e awards ceremony and opening reception for Portfolio 2014 will take place Saturday, April 12, at 2 p.m.

Every spring HMA hosts an exhibition of art from the middle schools and high schools in our Tri-State area of West Virginia, Kentucky and Ohio. This event, called Portfolio, is very special for students and art teachers. Students are delighted to have their work displayed in a museum. When they attend the opening, often with parents and family members, they are so pleased and proud of their accomplishments.

Teachers also experience pride and gratification when they see the culmination of the work they have imparted toward their students. An added bonus to all of these good feelings is that there are monetary awards. A Professor of Art from Marshall University carefully views and judges all of the work, selecting the 13 award winners. This is a challenging task, taking time and consideration, since there are usually about 180 to 200 works of art in Portfolio. There are eight recognition awards of $25 each; four excellence awards of $50 each and one award for $100, the Janet Bromley Excellence in the Arts Award. These award winners are announced, recognized and congratulated at the opening reception. In addition, the judge delivers a PowerPoint presentation which is intended to give further learning and insight for students and teachers.

Counties that participate in the Tri-State area are: Cabell, Putnam, Jackson, Wayne, Lincoln, Mingo and Mason in West Virginia; Lawrence in Ohio; and Boyd and Greenup in Kentucky.

This exhibit is presented by Marshall University College of Arts and Media; and sponsored by the West Virginia Division of Culture and History; and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Marshall University College of Arts and Media Presents: Portfolio 2014

Don Pendleton speaks at HMA about his work on April 10, 2014, at 7 p.m. Admission is free. Refreshments will be served. Pendleton will conduct a workshop titled Fine Lines: The Art of Skateboard Graphics on April 11-14, 2014, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call (304) 529-2701 for workshop fee information or to register. Pendleton returns to HMA for a Skateboarding Demo on May 17 from 2 to 5 p.m. Admission is free. The rain date for this event is May 18 from 2 to 5 p.m. Participants younger than 18 must wear helmets and have written parental permission to participate. Parents must be present to sign permission forms.

Don Pendleton is an American artist, designer, illustrator and writer whose legendary skateboard graphics define the visual identity of one of the fastest-growing sports in the world. Born and raised in Ravenswood, W.Va., Pendleton grew up watching his father paint, and embraced drawing at the age of nine. He discovered skateboarding five years later, attracted to the highly visual culture and its emphasis on creativity. Mutually intertwined, these twin passions offered an escape from youthful boredom and fueled Pendleton for years to come.

As a sponsored skateboarder, Pendleton quickly moved through the amateur ranks, competing and doing demos throughout the Midwest and East Coast until an ankle injury in 1992 shifted his focus back to artwork. He earned a bachelor’s degree in graphic arts with a minor in sociology from Marshall University in 1994. Pendleton took all of the art jobs he could find in an effort to build his portfolio. During the mid-‘90s, he developed much of his current style while working at several newspapers and publications, focusing on layout, design and illustration. He landed a coveted position of in-house graphic artist and designer for Alien Workshop in 1998 – then a burgeoning skateboard and apparel company where creativity and originality were paramount. He spent the better part of a decade establishing the company’s visual identity, and Alien Workshop quickly became one of the most popular skateboard companies in the world. From 2005-2009, Pendleton spearheaded the creative and marketing team of skateboarding giant, Element Skateboards, from his home base in Dayton, Ohio. He is currently a freelance commercial and fine artist whose client list includes Zero Skateboards, LG Electronics, Mountain Dew, Gatorade, Pearl Jam, Nike 6.0, and DC Shoes, among many others.

Pendleton’s paintings, prints and design work have been exhibited in group and solo shows around the globe, and featured in magazines such as Juxtapoz, Transworld, The Skateboard Mag, and other print and online publications. He has also participated in many live painting events throughout the U.S. and Europe. In 2009, a documentary film titled, “Little Giants” chronicled his life and work. When not traveling, Pendleton can be found painting in his studio, riding his skateboard, or in front of a computer working on graphics for his recently resurrected company, Darkroom.

This exhibit is generously presented by Paris Signs and sponsored by Bulldog Creative Services.

The Walter Gropius Master Artist Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition, as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

Barbizon Paintings

October 26 - June 29, 2014

The artists of the Barbizon School differed in age, working technique, artistic background, and lifestyle. The Barbizon School was not an official art academy, but rather an association that serendipitously formed beginning in the 1820s in the Forest of Fontainebleau, and the many hamlets surrounding the forest – especially the small town of Barbizon. At the time, the Forest of Fontainebleau was a dense forest of 42,000 acres. A number of artists took up residence there, some year-round, many just for the summer. All came to escape the city and its encroaching industrialized society. These artists included Théodore Rousseau, Jean-Françoise Millet, Narcisse Diaz de la Pena, Camille Corot, Charles-Françoise Daubigny and many others who concentrated on landscape and scenes of rural life. Collectively these artistic pioneers championed landscape painting at a time when the French art academies and the official salon did not.

Artists of the Barbizon School were particularly admired by American collectors, and were a particular favorite of one of the Museum’s founders, Herbert Fitzpatrick. In 1952 he donated more than 25 important paintings by artists of the Barbizon School. In subsequent years, other area collectors have generously added to this legacy collection, including Mary H. Resener, Dr. and Mrs. Don H. Titus, and Dr. John and Amber Haid. These French artists who pioneered painting out-of-doors greatly influenced, and were eventually eclipsed by a younger generation of artists – the impressionists.

This exhibit is generously sponsored by the Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment; West Virginia Division of Culture and History; and National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

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