The Huntington Museum of Art will welcome Patrick Lee as a Walter Gropius Master Artist in October when the artist speaks about his work during a free public presentation on Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016, at 7 p.m. Lee will present a three-day workshop at HMA titled “Drawing Realism” on Oct. 14-16, 2016, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visit www.hmoa.org or call (304) 529-2701 for workshop fee information or to register.

Patrick Lee is internationally recognized for his exquisitely rendered graphite portrait drawings of Los Angeles gang members, an ongoing series appropriately titled, “Deadly Friends.” Lee approaches his subjects on the streets of Southern California and photographs them as studies for his drawings – a process that relies on mutual trust, honesty and relationship-building. Hand drawn and resolved over many months, the artist diligently renders muscles, pores, scars, tattoos, and facial hair in painstakingly accurate photorealistic detail.

Born in 1969 in Butte, Montana, Lee graduated from the Minneapolis College of Art & Design in 1988 and is the recipient of the 2006 Peter S. Reed Foundation Achievement Award, as well as the Nikon 2000 Grand Prize. He has had numerous exhibitions nationally and internationally. Recent solo exhibitions include such venues as Western Project, Los Angeles, California, and Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe, New York, New York. Recent group exhibitions include “Drawing for the New Century,” Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Minneapolis, Minnesota; “B-B-B-BAD…an exhibition with attitudes,” Anna Kustera Gallery, New York, New York; “Male,” Maureen Paley Gallery, London, United Kingdom, curated by Vince Aletti; “Do I Know You,” Inman Gallery, Houston, Texas; “Lush Life,” Salon 94 Freemans, New York, New York; and “Cherry Pie,” Western Project, Los Angeles, California. His work may be found in the permanent collections of the High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Georgia, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Texas.

Patrick Lee currently lives and works in Los Angeles, California, and is represented by Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe, New York, New York.

The Walter Gropius Master Artist Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition, as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

The Daywood Collection Exhibit

July 23 - October 30, 2016

Some of the artists represented in the exhibit include Childe Hassam, Gari Melchers, Frank W. Benson, Robert Henri and Howard Somerville, whose painting “Joyce” is one of the most beloved by Museum Members in HMA’s permanent collection of more than 15,000 objects.

“When these amazing works of art come out of the vault and go up on exhibit here at the Huntington Museum of Art, it is truly like visiting with old friends again,” said HMA Senior Curator Chris Hatten. “We know that longtime supporters of HMA are very familiar with these works and are happy when they go on view, but we look forward to new visitors seeing these masterpieces for the first time as well.”

Arthur S. Dayton (1887-1948), and Ruth Woods Dayton (1894-1978) compiled The Daywood Collection and Mrs. Dayton donated the collection of more than 300 works of art to HMA in December 1966.

Born in Phillippi, W.Va., in 1887, Arthur S. Dayton’s father was an attorney, judge and U.S. Congressman. Arthur Dayton earned a law degree at West Virginia University in 1908. He went on to attend Yale and receive a Master’s degree there. He was an avid collector of not only art but also rare books, including Mark Twain first editions and Shakespeare folios among several other Elizabethan-period works.

Also from Phillippi, Ruth Woods Dayton was born there in 1894 and attended what would later become Greenbrier College and earned a certificate from the New York School of Interior Design. She married Arthur S. Dayton on June 14, 1916, and wrote articles and books about early West Virginia settlers. After her husband passed away in 1948, Mrs. Dayton would later give her husband’s legal library to the West Virginia University Law Library and his rare book collection to the West Virginia University Library.

The works of art that were eventually gifted to the Huntington Museum of Art were shown beginning in 1951 in a Lewisburg building known as The Daywood Art Gallery, Inc., which was a nonprofit organization.

The small country of the Netherlands has produced a remarkable number of artists whose fame and influence have spread far beyond their native land. A robust artistic tradition that made paintings and prints widely available to the Dutch citizenry, rather than only the wealthy or the politically powerful, offered an environment that supported a thriving culture for professional artists. A selection of objects from the Huntington Museum of Art collection will highlight the work of a number of Dutch artists, ranging from a group of etchings by Rembrandt and early natural history prints to paintings by members of The Hague School, whose rural subjects echoed those of the Barbizon School in France.

In addition to being the premier painter of the Dutch Golden Age, Rembrandt’s prolific and masterful work in the etching medium had a profound effect upon generations of artists that followed him. The Huntington Museum of Art owns three etchings by Rembrandt, a pair of religious scenes and a portrait of Jan Lutma, a goldsmith from Amsterdam. Two other 17th century painters, Gerard Dou and Caspar Netscher, are represented by paintings
that show the range of subject matter that would have been offered in Holland at the time, both formal portraits of the rich and famous and the everyday subject matter that became a staple of Dutch genre paintings.

As European explorers sailed to new and exotic locations, naturalists began to record information and images about the plants and animals they encountered on these journeys. A wealth of information on these subjects was disseminated in a number of books that were sumptuously illustrated by artists such as Maria Sibylla Merian, a German-born artist who later relocated to Amsterdam, where she prospered as a botanical illustrator, an unusual feat for a woman of her time.

By the latter portion of the 19th century, a thriving group of Dutch artists pictured the rural agricultural landscape and humble peasant subjects of their native land in a manner that was much like the work of French painters such as Corot and Millet. Known collectively as The Hague School, painters such as Josef Israels and Anton Mauve depicted the Dutch countryside and its inhabitants, infusing their works with a subdued tonal range and emphasis on the mood created by the gray skies that so often characterize the Netherlandish atmosphere.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Earth Stories

June 25 - October 2, 2016

Opening reception takes place during the July Tuesday Tour on July 26, 2016, at 7 p.m. Admission to this Macy’s Free Tuesday event is free.

Art has long served as a voice to express concern over issues that affect human society.

Certainly one of the most pressing problems that confronts the current generation is the long-term health of the planet. Answers to the challenges presented by overpopulation, endangered wildlife, costly sources of energy, air and water pollution, climate change, diminishing farmland and deforestation are sought by a host of organizations and individuals.

Studio Art Quilt Associates, an organization that exists to promote art quilts and the artists who make them, issued a call for artists to submit proposals for works that would highlight a person or group that is working to improve the Earth. Entries were received from the United States, Europe and the Middle East. Juror Dr. Carolyn Mazloomi, a decorated quilt artist herself, selected a group of 24 proposals based on compelling themes as well as the technical and artistic skills demonstrated in the artists’ portfolios. “I looked for work that would emotionally draw me in … pieces with the distinctive voice of the artist coming through which would be memorable and move my spirit,” Mazloomi said.

The resulting works touch upon a variety of themes and the initiatives that are underway by a number of organizations and individuals to address some of the planet’s problems. Community projects such as The Tenderloin People’s Garden in San Francisco, the seismic-resistant housing efforts of Architecture for Humanity and the housing preservation group Haushaltenin Leipzig, Germany, inspired works that showcased the push to promote urban sustainability.

Artists Regina V. Benson, Cynthia St. Charles, and Jennifer Day chose to focus on the growing effort to harness renewable energy, while Nancy Cook, Annie Helmericks-Louder, Alicia Merrett, Leni Levenson Wiener, Mary Pal and Noriko Endo all created quilts that turn the spotlight on preserving the rich variety of wildlife on the Earth.

Other works look at projects that are attempting to improve the health of our forests and waterways, as well as efforts that address overpopulation and sustainable agriculture. The rich and colorful quilts that resulted from this project are not only strikingly beautiful in their own right, but they serve the purpose of focusing attention upon the worldwide struggle to protect and preserve our planet.

In conjunction with Earth Stories, a group of quilts from the Huntington Museum of Art’s permanent collection will be on display in the Print Gallery wing of the Daywood Gallery.

This exhibit is presented with support from Dr. Leslie Petteys and William “Skip” Campbell.

Heirloom Sponsor for Earth Stories: Jason and Halcyon Moses, In Memory of Pat “Grammie” Barton.

This exhibit is supported by Robert Angel, In Memory of Mary Collins Chaney; Jan and Dennis Bills, In Memory of Their Parents; Adam Joseph Booth, In Memory of Jeanne Kaplan Dunn; Marian F. Crowe, In Memory of Eugene R. Crowe; John Gillispie and Patty Gillispie, In Memory of Lorri Tipton; Nancy Hoey, In Memory of Charlotte and Albert Boos; Mr. and Mrs. Timothy R. Kinsey, In Honor of Mrs. Rae Mitchell; Mark Tobin Moore and Donna Jean Whitten, In Memory of Henry C. Keeling, Emeritus Professor, University of Charleston; David and Janet Perdue, In Memory of Mary Lycans Asbury; Ruth C. Sullivan, In Honor of Joseph Sullivan; and Susan Weinstein, In Memory of Mary Etta Hight.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Opening reception takes place on Sunday, July 17, 2016, from 2 to 4 p.m. Admission is free.

HMA plans to show the documentary film about the artist titled “Packed in a Trunk: The Lost Art of Edith Lake Wilkinson,” which is available on DVD from Wolfe Video, on August 23, 2016, during the August Tuesday Tour. Admission to this Macy’s Free Tuesday event is free.

It has been close to 60 years since West Virginia artist Edith Lake Wilkinson died in Huntington, West Virginia, in 1957 after spending the final decades of her life in the city’s state asylum.

When the exhibit titled A TALENT FORGOTTEN: The Art of Edith Lake Wilkinson goes on view at the Huntington Museum of Art on July 2, 2016, the artist will finally receive some recognition for her work in a city where she lived for many years under the care of the state.

“The Huntington Museum of Art is very pleased to be the first art museum in West Virginia to own a number of original works by her,” said Geoffrey K. Fleming, HMA’s Executive Director. “This is also a historically important
occasion for a number of reasons. It will be the first major exhibition of Edith Lake Wilkinson’s artwork in nearly a century in her home state of West Virginia, and it is the largest number of her works ever assembled for
exhibition,” he continued.

Wilkinson was born in Wheeling, West Virginia, on Aug. 23, 1868. Wilkinson, who grew up with a passion for art under her mother’s tutelage, graduated from The Union School and moved to New York City in 1889 to study at the Art Students League. She remained at the League though 1891, where she studied with a number of important American painters, including James Carroll Beckwith, William Merritt Chase, and Kenyon Cox.

Later, Wilkinson began to travel regularly to the growing art colony located in Provincetown, Massachusetts. Here, among many other young, American artists including fellow West Virginian Blanche Lazzell, she thrived and honed her impressionistic technique. It was during her time there that she found herself at the forefront of the development of what has become known today as the “white line woodblock print,” a curiously American print form
developed by the artist and teacher, B.J.O. Nordfeldt. From 1913 through 1923 she would be a fixture during the summer months in the bohemian art colony along with her partner, Fannie Wilkinson.

Following the accidental death of her parents in 1922, Edith Lake Wilkinson increasingly fell under the control of the attorney handling their substantial estate, George Jackson Rogers. Years later, he was accused of pilfering his clients’ holdings, including those of Edith Lake Wilkinson, and he may have had her committed to an asylum to take total control of her money. She was first permanently committed to the Sheppard Pratt Hospital in Baltimore in 1925, and, in 1935, was moved to Huntington.

Edith Lake Wilkinson never left the state hospital in Huntington. Deprived of her ability to create art, she died there in 1957. Her artwork, which had been packed away in trunks in the family home in Wheeling, was rediscovered in the 1960s and since that time there has been a growing interest in her life and career.

A TALENT FORGOTTEN: The Art of Edith Lake Wilkinson will run at HMA through Sept. 18, 2016, with an opening reception on Sunday, July 17, 2016, from 2 to 4 p.m. Admission to the opening reception is free. A profusely illustrated catalog on Wilkinson, her life, and her works will be available for sale through the HMA gift shop.

HMA plans to show the documentary film about the artist titled “Packed in a Trunk: The Lost Art of Edith Lake Wilkinson” on Aug. 23, 2016, during the August Tuesday Tour on the day that is the 148th anniversary of Wilkinson’s birth. Admission to this Macy’s Free Tuesday event is free. The documentary film is available on DVD from Wolfe Video.

Sponsored by Dr. Leslie Petteys & William “Skip” Campbell; and Louise & Lake Polan. Presented with support from Margaret Mary Layne in Honor of Jamez Morris-Smith and Samuel Kincaid.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Brooke Atherton will speak at HMA about her work on Sept. 8, 2016, at 7 p.m. Admission to this presentation is free. The artist will present a workshop at HMA titled Crossing Media: Art of the Mix on September 9-11, 2016, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call (304) 529-2701 for workshop fee information.

Brooke Atherton’s art quilts are built up in layers of silk, cotton, and wool from canvas backings. She manipulates the fabric by ripping, burning, and rusting; these non-traditional methods represent the effects of elemental forces such as fire and water, which she then fuses and stitches extensively. Atherton collects artifacts on walks about town and camping trips in the mountains which she incorporates into her fiber art. Her art is a visual record of her life and journey across the North American West. Many works function as intimate personal libraries, calendars, maps, and measuring devices that relate to specific stories and events, with underlying themes of passage through time and space, and meaning built through repetition. She also draws inspiration from the journals of the Lewis and Clark expedition and Victorian daybook ledgers.

Atherton is a nationally recognized textile artist whose art quilts and mixed media works build community and tell stories. Atherton grew up in Ohio and earned a BFA from Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio. She decided she needed “more real life, not more theory” and embarked on a search for knowledge and experience; in the years that followed she worked as a video and performance artist, and was the artist-in-residence at an archaeological site. Atherton settled in Billings, MT, fifteen years ago where she works in an Arts in Medicine program at Billings Clinic Cancer Center. Atherton also taught at the Montana Women’s Prison as well as the Yellowstone Art Museum, and has organized several community art projects in Billings. Her work has been exhibited in museums, galleries, and fiber art shows in the United States and England, including Quilt Visions in San Diego. She is the Montana and Idaho representative for Studio Art Quilt Associates and has exhibited in several traveling SAQA shows.

This exhibit is presented by Macy’s.

Macys


The Walter Gropius Master Artist Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition, as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

Bridge Gallery

Please join us on March 22, 2016, at 7 p.m. for the March Tuesday Tour when this exhibit will be in the spotlight. Refreshments will be served. This is a Macy’s Free Tuesday event.

The rich and colorful work produced by self-taught artists in Haiti forms an important segment of the permanent collection at the Huntington Museum of Art. Beginning March 12, 2016, a selection of Haitian works will be on view in the Bridge Gallery. Most of the works were gifts of Winslow Anderson, a former designer at Blenko Glass who began visiting Haiti in the late 1940s and acquiring works of art while there. There will also be a selection of recent acquisitions that have been purchased with income provided by the Winslow Anderson Endowment Fund.

This exhibit is presented by Macy’s.
macys logo

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Opening reception for this exhibit takes place on Sunday, June 5, 2016, from 2 to 4 p.m.

Since the 1950s, HMA has served as the exhibition venue for the Tri-State Arts Association, featuring work by artists from West Virginia, Kentucky and Ohio. The group meets at HMA on the second Thursday of every OTHER month in February, April, June, August, October and December at 6:30 p.m. in Studio 1. For more information, visit the group’s website at www.tristatearts.webs.com.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Tri-State Arts Association Juried Exhibition 2016

Studio Selections

May 17 - June 26, 2016

Opening reception will take place on May 17 at 6 p.m.

Studio Selections is an exhibition celebrating the accomplishments of people who have participated in HMA’s studio program during the year. Classes in watercolor, painting, photography, clay and drawing are very popular at the Museum. Be sure to come and enjoy this exhibit and see what goes on in HMA’s studio program.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Studio Selections

Abelardo Morell, who is a photographer, had been scheduled to speak about his work and offer a three-day workshop at HMA in March, but both the lecture and workshop are being rescheduled with new dates to be announced soon.

Morell’s images offer clever post-modern commentary on the nature of photography by referencing the medium’s beginnings while simultaneously celebrating the ephemeral magic of light and shadow. He is best known for using a camera obscura – an optical device that preceded photography and the photographic camera – to create images that marry interior and exterior spaces in unexpected ways.

The artist was born in Havana, Cuba, in 1948, and immigrated to the United States in 1962. He earned his under­grad­u­ate degree in 1977 from Bow­doin Col­lege and an MFA from The Yale Uni­ver­sity School of Art in 1981. In 1997 he received an hon­orary degree from Bow­doin College. He has received a num­ber of awards and grants, including a Guggen­heim fellowship in 1994, a Rap­pa­port Prize in 2006, and the Inter­na­tional Cen­ter of Pho­tog­ra­phy’s Infin­ity Award in Art in 2011. His work has been col­lected and shown in many prestigious institutions, includ­ing the Museum of Mod­ern Art, the Met­ro­pol­i­tan Art Museum in New York, The Chicago Art Insti­tute, The Boston Museum of Fine Art, and more than 70 other muse­ums in the United States and abroad. His pub­li­ca­tions include a pho­to­graphic illus­tra­tion of Alice’s Adven­tures in Won­der­land (1998) by Dut­ton Children’s Books, Cam­era Obscura (2004) by Bulfinch Press, and a lim­ited edi­tion book by The Museum of Mod­ern Art in New York of his Cliché Verre images with a text by Oliver Sacks. He lives in Brook­line, Massachusetts.

The Walter Gropius Master Artist Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition, as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

Opening reception takes place on September 22, 2015, at 7 p.m. at the Huntington Museum of Art. Admission to this Macy’s Free Tuesday event is free as part of the 4th Tuesday Series at HMA. Refreshments will be served. Dr. Mike Beck, HMA’s Conservatory Directory, will conduct several experiments, including the electrolysis of water, in HMA’s Education Gallery. Opening Reception Generously Sponsored by the Marshall University College of Science in Memory of Shelba Glenn Pew.

Water is the world’s most crucial resource and the basis for all earthly life. Its preservation and protection may be our greatest environmental challenge. The global water crisis affects everyone, from those lacking enough to those experiencing uncontrollable floods that wash away homes and land and wildlife. >Water, Water Everywhere: Paean to a Vanishing Resource will bring to light the sanctity of water and its sources, as well as the beauty and strangeness of water. The exhibition is comprised of 30-second to 30-minute films from 41 artists worldwide exploring water issues from the political to the personal and from ethics to aesthetics, with works that are documentary, experimental, educational, humorous, solemn, animated or acted.

Among the vibrant works in Water, Water Everywhere is a 22-minute International Rivers feature – “A River Runs Through Us,” describing the threats facing rivers, particularly from dams; “Icelock,” a 30-second short illustrating the melting of glaciers, by Brazilian filmmaker, Fernando Acquarone; a 3-minute film, “The Kabul Sea,” by Afghan filmmaker, Alka Sadat, about the Kabul River; a 22-minute film from Evan Abramson, “Carbon for Water,” about profound water disasters in Africa; a 4-minute film from Indonesian artist, Monika Hapsari, called “Big Trash,” that looks at agriculture and overpopulation; a performance film by British artist, Claudia Borgna, called “Sweep and Weep, Weep and Sweep,” in which she cleans the beaches; a 14-minute teaching documentary by Friends of the Earth Middle East called “Good Water Neighbors”; an 8-minute work Jacques del Conte called “A Colossal Fracking Mess”; a 5-minute film by Canadian Liz Marshall about deadly tar sands, and more from Europe, Latin America, Africa, South, Central and East Asia, as well as North America.

The exhibition is curated by Jennifer Heath, an independent scholar, award-winning cultural journalist, critic, curator and activist. Her many exhibitions include The Veil: Visible & Invisible Spaces, and The Art We Love to Hate: Black Velvet. She is the author of nine books of fiction and non-fiction, including Land of the Unconquerable: The Lives of Contemporary Afghan Women, from the University of California Press.

This exhibit is a project of Baksun Books & Arts. For more information on this exhibit, visit www.waterwatereverywhere-artshow.com.

Special Thanks to the members of HMA’s NXTGEN Committee who helped in the planning for this exhibit.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Opening Reception will take place on March 19, 2016, from 6 to 8 p.m. Admission to this opening reception is free.

Since its beginnings, the Huntington Museum of Art has sought to serve artists throughout the state of West Virginia by providing opportunities for exhibiting their work. Certainly one of the richest talent pools within the state exists in the art departments at the colleges and universities in West Virginia, the largest of which is in Morgantown at West Virginia University.

Here to There is an exhibition of work that showcases the award-winning faculty of West Virginia University’s School of Art & Design. Alison Helm, Director of the School of Art & Design, says, “The exhibition is a way of symbolically connecting not only two ends of the state but also the experiences of the artists who share similar elements of place, facilities, technology and robust stylistic languages. We share common ground situated within the borders of this lushly inspiring state. From us to you, from artists to viewers, our work is about diversity of communication, visual phrasing, systems of materiality, artificial landscapes, reproduction and employing a wide variety of aesthetics with a willingness to take risks.”

Fourteen artists will exhibit work in a wide range of materials and formats, from painting and ceramics to electronic media. The faculty who will participate include Dylan Collins (Sculpture), Eve Faulkes (Graphic Design), Joseph Galbreath (Graphic Design), Gerald Habarth (Electronic Media), Alison Helm (Sculpture), Jason Lee (Foundations/Sculpture), Joseph Lupo (Printmaking), Robert “Boomer” Moore (Ceramics), Jeffrey Moser (Interactive Media Design), Kofi Opoku (Graphic Design), Shoji Stake (Ceramics), Amy Schissel (Painting), Michael Sherwin (Photography) and Naijun Zhang (Painting).

An illustrated catalog will accompany the exhibition. “We are grateful to our funders, the Colonel Eugene E. Myers Foundations and the Dr. Hubert E. &Traude E. Martin Endowment, who have made this exhibition and publication a reality,” Helm said.

This exhibit is part of HMA’s ongoing efforts to highlight the work of West Virginia artists and follows The Art of Teaching Art: Marshall University Visual Art Faculty Show, which ran at HMA from Nov. 23, 2013, through Feb. 2, 2014.

Gold Mountaineer Sponsor for this exhibit is Medical Practice Management Solutions.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Opening reception and awards ceremony will take place at HMA on April 2, 2016, at 2 p.m.

Marshall University College of Arts and Media Presents Portfolio 2016 is an exhibit of work created by middle school and high school students from the Tri-State Area. This exhibit celebrates the hard work accomplished by teachers and students. Each middle school teacher selects four works of art from their classes and each high school teacher selects six. What a challenging task for the teachers!

This year’s exhibit includes more than 150 works in the Portfolio exhibit. A faculty member from the MU College of Arts and Media views all entries and identifies the award winners.

Portfolio 2016 is presented by the Marshall University College of Arts and Media.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Marshall University College of Arts and Media Presents Portfolio 2016

Courtyard Series: Kathleen Kneafsey

October 24 - March 24, 2016

The Courtyard Series: Kathleen Kneafsey exhibit includes two bronze pieces created by Kneafsey in graduate school.

Kneafsey, who is HMA’s Artist in Residence, and known for her work in ceramics, compared working with clay to working with bronze in the September 2015 issue of HMA’s Members’ Magazine. “I had never worked in bronze and was very interested in exploring it,” Kneafsey said. “What I found was the process of bronze casting shares many of the same aspects that I enjoy about working in clay. There are many steps in the process of making things in clay, and I enjoy the fact that you have to be both diligent and patient. I also enjoy putting pieces and parts together. “Working in bronze shares all of these qualities, with many steps to the final piece,” Kneafsey said. “To create these particular bronze pieces, I began with the building of the nest and house out of sticks. Then I made several investments, or molds of the pieces, including the legs. The investments were then placed into a kiln, where the actual sticks were burned out, leaving a void to be filled with bronze. Next, bronze was then poured into the investment and allowed to cool. Once cool, the bronze pieces were broken out of the investment and cleaned. I then welded the pieces and parts together to create the final forms. “You can see how these multiple steps are very similar to the making, firing, glazing and firing again of clay pieces,” Kneafsey said. “The transition from clay to bronze as materials and processes was an easy and enjoyable one for me. Bronze also has the one quality that I love so much about clay. While both materials are very rigid once they are completed works, they still reveal the fluidity and softness that they possessed during their making.” Kneafsey holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts in ceramics from Clemson University, a Master of Arts in ceramics from Marshall University and a Master of Fine Arts in ceramics from Miami University. She is the artist-in-residence at the Huntington Museum of Art, where she maintains the ceramics studio, teaches classes for adults and children, and is responsible for inviting and overseeing renowned ceramic artists for the museum’s Walter Gropius Masters Workshop Series. Her work has been included in many national exhibitions and publications, and is held in both private and public collections. She lives in Huntington, West Virginia, with her husband and three children. This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Collection Wisdom: Trustees Select II

November 21 - February 21, 2016

Out of the more than 15,000 works of art in the permanent collection at the Huntington Museum of Art, which work would you pick as your favorite, and why? For a series of exhibits we are calling Collection Wisdom, we are posing that question to folks who know the collection well, HMA’s staff members and Board of Trustees.

Following Mary H. Hodges, In Memory of J. Churchill Hodges, Presents Collection Wisdom: Emeritus & Honorary Trustees Select, Collection Wisdom: Staff Selects, and Collection Wisdom: Trustees Select I, this exhibit features artwork chosen by members of HMA’s Board of Trustees.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Collection Wisdom: Trustees Select II

Exhibition 280

October 10 - February 14, 2016

Opening reception for this event takes place on Saturday, October 10, 2015, from 5 to 7 p.m. Admission is free.

Throughout the history of the Huntington Museum of Art, one of its most important roles has been providing a venue for regional artists. Exhibition 280 is a regional, juried exhibition, presented by the Huntington Museum of Art, in altered versions, since 1953 – one year after the founding of the institution. Originally, the radius for eligibility was small, reaching out to artists living in an 80-mile radius of Huntington. Later, the boundaries were widened to 180 miles, then, 280. Now, all artists who are 18 years of age or older who reside in West Virginia and her contiguous neighbor states (Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Maryland) may participate.

We are pleased to work with Patterson Sims, our juror for this year’s competition. Sims has an impressive background in the arts, concentrated in the modern and contemporary field with a specialty in American modernism and contemporary art. He served as Director of the Montclair Art Museum from 2001 – 2008. He was Deputy Director for Research Support at The Museum of Modern Art from 1996 – 2001. He served as Associate Director of Art and Exhibitions and Curator of Modern Art at the Seattle Art Museum. Additionally, he worked at the Whitney Museum from 1976 – 1987. He has authored books on Ellsworth Kelly, Jan Matulka, Willie Cole and Philip Pearlstein as well as writing on a wide range of artists including Viola Frey, James Surls, Georgia O’Keefe, Ad Reinhardt and Charles Burchfield.

Thanks to Jack and Angie Bourdelais for generously sponsoring the Awards of Excellence.

Presented with support from Macy’s and the following individuals:

  • Robert and Christine Anderson,
  • In Memory of Julia Kathryn and Edward Baughman
  • Maxine K. Baur, In Memory of Dr. Jack H. Baur
  • BASIC Supply Company, Inc.,
  • In Memory of Joseph Sr. & Loretta Lawson Williams
  • Barrie Kaufman, In Honor of Jenine Culligan
  • Margaret Mary Layne, In Memory of Dr. John E. Dolin
  • Joanne Maynard, In Memory of Martha Ambrose Bieler
  • Charles McKay, M.D., In Memory of Bernice McKay
  • Robert Olson, In Memory of Catherine Cummings
  • Mary Patricia Owen, In Memory of Catherine E. Childers
  • Shirley Pugh, In Memory of Janarie Cole
  • Rose Riter, In Honor of Cindy Dearborn
  • Dr. and Mrs. Tully S. Roisman, In Memory of Leeanne Small
  • Anne Shuff, In Memory of Marjorie Hollandsworth
  • Mrs. Charles E. Turner, In Memory of Dr. Charles Turner
  • Kristi D. Wheeler, In Honor of Alexander and Ethan Bailey
  • Joseph and Shirley Williams,
  • In Memory of Joseph (Sr.) & Loretta Williams
  • and Lee & Willene Johnson

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Opening reception takes place on Sunday, October 25, 2015, from 2 to 4 p.m. This exhibit will be accompanied by a catalogue, which will be available for purchase in the Museum Shop.

The Huntington Museum of Art owes its existence to the generosity of Herbert Fitzpatrick, a local attorney who had a strong desire to enrich the cultural life of his adopted hometown. His gifts of 52 acres and an extensive collection of artwork provided the foundation for the effort to establish the Huntington Galleries, which opened in 1952. It was thus very appropriate that an organization that was created in 1989 to help foster the growth of the museum’s art collection was named the Fitzpatrick Society.

The Society enlists the help of interested art lovers who pay membership dues to belong to the group. The dues are then used to purchase additional artworks for the collection. A number of potential purchases are displayed at the Society’s annual meeting, and members are allowed to cast a vote to pick their favorite work. The leading vote-getter is then purchased by the museum and added to the collection. Depending on available revenue, some years have seen multiple items acquired through Society funds.

The Fitzpatrick Society received a substantial boost in its ability to purchase works of art when it became the beneficiary of a bequest from the estate of longtime docent and museum supporter Don Harper. Mr. Harper, a Huntington native, enjoyed a lengthy career in government service in Washington, D.C. Following his retirement, he returned to live in his hometown and became a dedicated volunteer at the museum. The bequest that followed his passing in 2003 specified that a large portion of the funds from his estate should be used as an endowment to benefit the activities of the Fitzpatrick Society. In addition to its primary focus upon enriching the museum’s art collection, the Donald B. Harper Endowment also supports scholarly and educational initiatives at the Museum, including publishing and docent education and enrichment.

Since its first purchases were made in 1990, more than 30 works have been added to the museum collection through the efforts of the Society. These works mirror the diverse nature of the HMA collection and include everything from a centuries-old Inuit story board to contemporary works on paper, old master prints, photographs, paintings and studio glass. Several of the acquisitions have aided the Museum’s attempts to collect representative works by visiting artists in the Walter Gropius Master Artist Series.

For information on joining the Fitzpatrick Society, please contact HMA Development Director Carol Bailey.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Camden Park Presents Art on a Limb

November 24 - January 10, 2016

HMA celebrates the holidays with a creative exhibit that fills the museum with handmade works of art by area artists and artist groups. Holiday trees featuring handmade decorations are placed in different gallery spaces throughout the museum. Be sure to come visit and enjoy Camden Park Presents Art on a Limb!

This exhibit will be on view during Camden Park Presents Holiday Open House, which runs from 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday, December 6, 2015, at HMA. Camden Park Presents Holiday Open House features performances by local groups, a visit from Santa Claus, children’s art activities and refreshments. Admission to Camden Park Presents Holiday Open House is free.