HIMG Presents The Daywood Collection

March 15 - November 2, 2014

Between the years 1916 and 1965, Philippi, West Virginia, natives Arthur Spencer Dayton (1887-1948) and Ruth Woods Dayton (1894-1978) carefully selected a superb collection of American and European paintings, prints, sculpture and decorative arts that speak to their personal philosophy of beauty in art. During their years in Charleston (1923-1948), the couple began seriously building their collection. They bought what they liked and what they could afford. They purchased works from art galleries, and over the years built a special relationship with MacBeth Gallery in New York City. They also bought directly from auctions, from prestigious exhibitions such as the Carnegie International, and purchased works directly from the studios of artists whom they admired – both in the United States and abroad. The Daytons kept a detailed and valuable record of where and when objects were acquired.

They were well read on the history of art, especially 19thand 20th century American artists, sharing a penchant for landscapes. The strength of their collection lies in academically trained artists working in the various schools of realism and American impressionism, including masterworks by Childe Hassam, J. Alden Weir, Emil Carlsen, John Twachtman, Willard Metcalf, Frank Benson, Charles Davis and works by “The Eight.” The ideals and works by early American modernists were of little interest.

In 1929, Ruth purchased from MacBeth Gallery an etching titled Calvary Church in Snow by Childe Hassam, and gave it to Arthur as a Christmas gift. Thus began a collection of engravings, etchings and lithographs by a literal “who’s who” of American and European printmakers. The Daytons also had a penchant for small bronzes, especially by women artists working in the late 19thand early 20th centuries, including Grace Helen Talbot, Harriet Frishmuth, Anna Hyatt Huntington, and Edith Parsons. A small collection of Lacy period glass was also part of the collection.

Arthur Dayton died suddenly at the age of sixty-one in May, 1948. With the goal of sharing the collection with the public, Ruth Dayton turned a building on the property adjacent to their home in Lewisburg, West Virginia, into a museum. She called it The Daywood Gallery, combining Arthur’s surname (Dayton) and her maiden name (Woods). The collection continued to grow through purchases and donations. The Daywood Gallery remained in operation from 1951 into 1966. The following year The Daywood Collection was donated to the Huntington Museum of Art.

This exhibit is presented by HIMG and generously sponsored by Carolyn Bagby, In Memory of Patricia Parker Agee; Carol and Brian Bailey, In Memory of Howard and Bettyanne Herbitter; Adam Booth, In Memory of Jeanne Ellen Kaplan; Bennie Breece, In Memory of William Campbell and Patricia Parker Agee; Gayle Cox, In Memory of Joe Cox; Glen Danahey, In Honor of Glen Danahey—PNC Institutional Investments; Halcyon and Jason Moses, In Memory of Garth, the greatest artist we’ve ever known; Katherine Peyton Forbes, In Memory of Patricia Parker Agee; Samme L. Gee, In Memory of Maymie Hanna Gee; Nancy E. Hoey, In Memory of Charlotte and Albert Boos; Mr. and Mrs. Selden McNeer, Jr., In Memory of Roberta Shinn Emerson; Tess Moore, In Memory of John P. Childers, Jr.; Ronald R. Morgan, In Memory of See-More (English Bull Terrier 4/25/2005-11/9/2010); Bill and Marilyn Murdock; Stacie and Jeff Rakes, In Honor of our sons Zachery and Isaac Rakes; Melissa Rowe, In Memory of Everett T. Calaway; Bob and Karen Schwarz in Honor of Bob’s 70th Birthday; Jack Steinberg, In Memory of Edda Steinberg; The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment; West Virginia Division of Culture and History; and National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Walter Gropius Master Artist Albert Pfarr will speak about his work at 7 p.m. September 25, 2014. Admission to the public presentation is free. A reception follows. He will facilitate a three-day workshop from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. September 26-28, 2014. For workshop fee information, call (304) 529-2701.

Brooklyn-based ceramist Albert Pfarr is known for large-scale, free-standing ceramic sculptures composed of hundreds of interconnecting and interchangeable parts that draw inspiration from patterns of construction in both nature and technology. Using a peg-and-hole fabrication technique, Pfarr inserts a variable combination of earthenware spines, flanges and loops into a cylindrical terra cotta core. The resulting non-representational forms “bloom” and develop organically, spontaneously, as he carefully balances and counterweights the numerous components. His assemblages are modular: each contains potential elements of the next, to be recycled into new objects in entirely different configurations. The scale and sheer physicality of Pfarr’s work can be intimidating and otherworldly, yet the familiar resemblance to oversized toys, models of molecular structures, or three-dimensional doodles engages and delights the viewer.

Albert Pfarr received a Bachelor of Arts from the State University of New York – Potsdam in 1984. Following post-baccalaureate study at the University of Massachusetts – Amherst, he earned a Master of Fine Arts degree in 1990 from the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University. Pfarr has received numerous awards, research grants, fellowships and residencies, both stateside and abroad. In 2005, he was one of six national Emerging Artists chosen by the National Council for Education of Ceramic Arts. The following year, he was selected as the NCECA Artist-in-Residence for a six-week residency at the Guldagergaard International Ceramic Research Center in Denmark. Pfarr’s work is represented in numerous private and public collections such as the Daum Museum of Contemporary Art, Sedalia, Missouri; the Archie Bray Foundation, Helena, Montana; and the John Michael Kohler Arts Center, Sheboygan, Wisconsin. His work has been featured in The New York Times, Ceramics Monthly, and American Craft, among others. Since 2007, Pfarr has managed the education and studio operations of Greenwich House Pottery, an internationally recognized center for ceramics in New York, N.Y.

The Walter Gropius Master Artist Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition, as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

Handwriting is a visual spatial activity and fosters creativity. When we write, we’re not only memorizing the letters on the paper but also the process and the experience of shaping them. Writing by hand allows a feeling of focused peacefulness. A group in our area that has concentrated on the art and techniques of beautiful handwriting for 30 years will be the focus of this exhibit in the Museum’s Bridge Gallery from July 12 – October 12, 2014. The Huntington Calligraphers’ Guild was established in September of 1984. Since the beginning, and still today, the group has held monthly meetings in the studios of the Huntington Museum of Art. This partnership is being celebrated with this display of 20 to 30 works.

Walter Gropius Master Artist Linn Meyers will speak about her work at 7 p.m. September 11, 2014, at HMA. Admission is free. A reception follows. Linn Meyers will facilitate a three-day workshop from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. September 12-14, 2014. Call (304) 529-2701 for workshop fee information.

This exhibit by Linn Meyers is titled Unintended Consequences, including collaborative works with Anne Seidman; Beverly Ress; Luis Silva; Rachel Farbiarz; Heidi Lau; Nancy White; Gary Gissler; and Elena Del Rivero.

Time is central to the work of Washington, DC-based artist, Linn Meyers, whose practice centers upon the intimacy and directness of drawing. Each dense and intricate ink line drawing is the result of a nearly meditative process by which Meyers lays down consecutive lines into largely organic forms, creating rhythmic repetitive patterns. Meyers’s layering of vivid colors creates a shimmering quality suggestive of light and movement across the surface of the work. Working in a range of scales, Meyers has in recent years moved from the page to creating site-specific wall drawings. Ambitious in scale and labor, these drawings can take several weeks to complete, their shapes responding to the architecture of the space and the surrounding elements.

Meyers completed a BFA at The Cooper Union, New York, NY, and earned an MFA from California College of the Arts, San Francisco, CA. Meyers has had solo shows at the American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center, Washington, DC; The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC; The University of Maryland, College Park; G Fine Art, Washington, DC; Margaret Thatcher Projects, New York; Gallery Joe, Philadelphia; and Westmoreland Museum of American Art, Greensburg. Meyers has also participated in several international group shows including the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Art, Tokyo and Paris Concret, Paris. She has received numerous awards including the Smithsonian Artist Research Fellowship, Artist-in-Residence at the San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art, Artist-in-Residence at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Artist-in-Residence at the Tamarind Institute, the Trawick Award, Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant, Excellence in Drawing Award from The Cooper Union, Artist-in-Residence at the Bronx Council on the Arts, and the Alex Katz Scholarship to Skowhegan. Meyers currently lives and works in Washington, DC.

The Walter Gropius Master Artist Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition, as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

Tri-State Arts Association

September 6 - October 5, 2014

The Tri-State Arts Association, in conjunction with the Museum, will present this biennial exhibition that promotes the work of artists living and working in West Virginia, Kentucky and Ohio. A variety of media will be represented, including painting, drawing, photography, ceramics, sculpture, glass, wood, textiles, and mixed-media. Interested artists can download the prospectus from the TSAA website. Questions can be directed to Libby Varner at (606) 465-5305.

The Tri-State Arts Association has been in existence since 1953. The association was formed “to encourage and promote a public interest in and understanding of all schools of art, and to create and develop a closer relationship between art and the community.” The Huntington Museum of Art has been showcasing work by members of the Tri-State Arts Association since 1959.

Most of us know Wayne County, West Virginia, native Herman P. Dean (1897-1978) for his impressive collection of historic firearms which he donated to the Huntington Museum of Art beginning in 1953, forming one of the most treasured legacy collections of the institution. Herman Dean also loved to travel, and was an active sportsman, and a prolific writer. A book titled Travel Notes written in 1957 includes a section he called Eskimoland which chronicles his travels in the Arctic. Today the area is known as Nunatsiavut (Northern coastal Labrador), Nunavik (Northern Quebec), and the territory of Nunavut and the Inuvialuit region (Northwest Territories). In 1950 Dean traveled aboard theM.V. Rupertsland, a Canadian trading vessel registered to the Hudson Bay Company. Embarking from Montreal, Dean sailed up the St. Lawrence River, through the Straits of Belle Island, up the coast of Labrador to Port Burwell on the Northern tip, and into the Hudson Bay. The Hudson Bay Company was engaged in trade with the Inuit People along the coasts of Northern Quebec and Baffin Island and Dean visited many of the ports and villages including George’s River, Ft. Chimo, Payne Bay, Sugluk, Cape Smith, Povungnituk, Churchill, Southampton Island, Cape Dorset, Repulse Bay, Igloolik, Chesterfield, Baker Lake, Lake Harbor, Frobisher Bay, and Paugnirtung. Dean mentions in Travel Notes that “It was my privilege to be the first white man to set foot on the soil at Povungnituk, with the exception of H.B.C. (Hudson Bay Company) personnel.”

On this trip, Dean took more than 400 photographs depicting the Inuit Peoples; sea ice and coastal landscape views; staff of the Hudson Bay Company posts; and crew on the M.V. Rupertsland. During this trip and during other adventures in the Arctic regions, Dean collected art and artifacts created by Inuit artists, including items made for trade such as figural stone and ivory sculptures, and hand woven, decorated baskets, as well as ivory objects used in everyday life such as a knive, snow goggles, and fish hooks. These items were a bequest from Herman Dean’s Estate to the Museum in 1978. A selection of photographs (which have never before been on view), and sculptures will be presented in Gallery Three.

This exhibit is sponsored In Memory of Jim Hollandsworth; Bob and Barbara Kress Bias, In Memory of Herman P. Dean; the Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment; West Virginia Division of Culture and History; and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Jeanne Quinn will speak about her work at 7 p.m. May 15, 2014, at HMA. Admission is free. A reception follows. Jeanne Quinn will conduct a three-day workshop at HMA titled “Line Into Form” from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 16-18, 2014. Call (304) 529-2701 for workshop fee information or to register.

Jeanne Quinn received a Bachelor of Arts degree cum laude in 1988 from Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio, where she studied art history and baroque music performance. Unsure how to resolve these two interests, after graduating she apprenticed to a woodworker in Tennessee and later to a violinmaker in Italy. Upon returning to the U.S., she got a job in Boston making flutes – an enjoyable position, but one that valued craft over creativity. Quinn desired to invent her own forms, although, like musical instruments, function and a relationship to the human body remained important considerations. She took ceramics classes at a community center and quickly realized clay’s potential for invention, as well as its deep, functional connection to the human body. Following post-baccalaureate study at the University of Colorado at Boulder with renowned ceramicist, Betty Woodman, she earned a Master of Fine Arts degree in 1995 from the University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.

Jeanne Quinn has exhibited widely, including the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Colorado; Robischon Gallery, Denver, Colorado; Grimmerhus Museum, Denmark; Formargruppen Gallery, Malmö, Sweden; Sculpturens Hus, Stockholm, Sweden; and the Taipei County Yingge Ceramics Museum, Taipei, Taiwan. She has been a resident artist at the MacDowell Colony, the Archie Bray Foundation, the International Ceramic Center in Denmark, the Kahla Porcelain Factory, and the Ceramic Center-Berlin in Germany. Her work is published in books such as The Artful Teapot by Garth Clark; Postmodern Ceramics, by Mark Del Vecchio; Sex Pots by Paul Matthieu; A Ceramic Continuum: Fifty Years of the Archie Bray Influence by Peter Held, and Confrontational Ceramics by Judith Schwartz. She has lectured at numerous institutions including Alfred University, Kansas City Art Institute, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, University of Minnesota, among others. Quinn is an Associate Professor in the Department of Art and Art History at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Quinn is renowned for hybrid works that combine porcelain in dynamic dialogue with unexpected mediums. In Floating, Quinn examines material culture through the disrupting lens of installation art. Based on an 18th century Italian lace pattern, the installation alludes to the history of decorative arts. It is also a porcelain chandelier that references multiples, materiality, and the human body. By suspending hundreds of precisely arranged ceramic objects, Quinn pushes ornament into space, isolating and celebrating that which is usually thought of as flat, superficial embellishment. The scale envelops, suggesting the softness and movement of textiles. Space itself becomes the place of decoration; the installation, a stage; the viewer, an actor.

The Walter Gropius Master Artist Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition, as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

The film “Kinngait: Riding Light into the World” will be presented at 7 p.m. May 27, 2014, during the May Fourth Tuesday Tour. Admission is free as part of Macy’s Free Tuesdays.

North of Sixty refers to the circle of latitude that is 60 degrees north of the earth’s equatorial plane. In Canada, the 60thparallel forms a boundary between the northern territories of Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut, and the western provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba to the south.

Forty prints selected from the collection of The Richard F. Brush Gallery, St. Lawrence University, Canton, New York offer a distinct portrait of Inuit life and culture in the Canadian Arctic. These works will be on view in conjunction with the concurrent exhibition titledExcavations from the Vault: Herman Dean and the Hudson Bay. Inuit printmaking as we know it today dates back to 1957 when James Houston, a young European-Canadian, helped to create a cooperative graphic arts workshop in Cape Dorset, located in the northeast Canadian Arctic and part of what is now the recently created territory of Nunavut. Cape Dorset artists are well known for stone carvings and stone-cut prints, as well as lithographs, stencil prints, and etchings. Artists from several generations portray the power and beauty of the natural world, as well as town and camp life, traditional Inuit stories and mythic creatures, and, more recently, influences from the south. Living in such a harsh environment, these artists pay close attention to and respect the forces of nature, but their work also illustrates at times a certain lyricism in the portrayal of humans and animals with their surroundings.

Among the best-known Inuit artists are Pudlo Pudlat (1916-1992), Kenojuak Ashevak (1927 - 2013), Kananginak Pootoogook (1935 - 2010), and Kavavaow Mannomee (born 1958). Pudlo was one of the first Inuit artists to explore nontraditional subject matter; a number of his prints feature airplanes and helicopters, and others show animals interacting in unexpected and sometimes humorous situations. Kenojuak’s prints often depict birds, such as loons, geese, owls, gulls, and ravens, woven fluidly together in elaborate designs and bright colors. Many of her prints depict human and animal transformation figures. Kenojuak has received several notable honors and awards from arts museums, universities and colleges, and the Canadian government. Kananginak is well known for his prints of hunting, fishing, and Arctic wildlife, such as caribou, polar bears, and seals. Younger artists such as Kavavaow are now expanding upon traditional themes in their work, with images depicting ATVs, television sets, and other commercial and material items from the south.

This exhibit is presented by The Macy’s Foundation and generously sponsored by The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment; West Virginia Division of Culture and History; and National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

An awards ceremony and reception for this exhibit will take place on Sunday, June 29, 2014, from 1 to 3 p.m.

For the second time, Allied Artists of West Virginia, Inc. a non-profit, educational and cultural association whose mission is to encourage, nurture and present the work of West Virginia artists to the community, will hold its biennial juried exhibition at the Huntington Museum of Art. Since approximately 1934, when two small art organizations combined efforts, Allied Artists of West Virginia has encouraged artists to show their work, has fostered the development of new works, and furthered artistic interests in the community.

Interested West Virginia artists 18 and older can download the prospectus from the Allied Artists of West Virginia website. Entries must be postmarked by March 30, 2014. Juror for the exhibit is artist/teacher Benjy Davies, Chair, and Associate Professor, School of Fine Arts, University of Rio Grande.

Barbizon Paintings

October 26 - June 29, 2014

The artists of the Barbizon School differed in age, working technique, artistic background, and lifestyle. The Barbizon School was not an official art academy, but rather an association that serendipitously formed beginning in the 1820s in the Forest of Fontainebleau, and the many hamlets surrounding the forest – especially the small town of Barbizon. At the time, the Forest of Fontainebleau was a dense forest of 42,000 acres. A number of artists took up residence there, some year-round, many just for the summer. All came to escape the city and its encroaching industrialized society. These artists included Théodore Rousseau, Jean-Françoise Millet, Narcisse Diaz de la Pena, Camille Corot, Charles-Françoise Daubigny and many others who concentrated on landscape and scenes of rural life. Collectively these artistic pioneers championed landscape painting at a time when the French art academies and the official salon did not.

Artists of the Barbizon School were particularly admired by American collectors, and were a particular favorite of one of the Museum’s founders, Herbert Fitzpatrick. In 1952 he donated more than 25 important paintings by artists of the Barbizon School. In subsequent years, other area collectors have generously added to this legacy collection, including Mary H. Resener, Dr. and Mrs. Don H. Titus, and Dr. John and Amber Haid. These French artists who pioneered painting out-of-doors greatly influenced, and were eventually eclipsed by a younger generation of artists – the impressionists.

This exhibit is generously sponsored by the Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment; West Virginia Division of Culture and History; and National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Don Pendleton speaks at HMA about his work on April 10, 2014, at 7 p.m. Admission is free. Refreshments will be served. Pendleton will conduct a workshop titled Fine Lines: The Art of Skateboard Graphics on April 11-14, 2014, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call (304) 529-2701 for workshop fee information or to register. Pendleton returns to HMA for a Skateboarding Demo on May 17 from 2 to 5 p.m. Admission is free. The rain date for this event is May 18 from 2 to 5 p.m. Participants younger than 18 must wear helmets and have written parental permission to participate. Parents must be present to sign permission forms.

Don Pendleton is an American artist, designer, illustrator and writer whose legendary skateboard graphics define the visual identity of one of the fastest-growing sports in the world. Born and raised in Ravenswood, W.Va., Pendleton grew up watching his father paint, and embraced drawing at the age of nine. He discovered skateboarding five years later, attracted to the highly visual culture and its emphasis on creativity. Mutually intertwined, these twin passions offered an escape from youthful boredom and fueled Pendleton for years to come.

As a sponsored skateboarder, Pendleton quickly moved through the amateur ranks, competing and doing demos throughout the Midwest and East Coast until an ankle injury in 1992 shifted his focus back to artwork. He earned a bachelor’s degree in graphic arts with a minor in sociology from Marshall University in 1994. Pendleton took all of the art jobs he could find in an effort to build his portfolio. During the mid-‘90s, he developed much of his current style while working at several newspapers and publications, focusing on layout, design and illustration. He landed a coveted position of in-house graphic artist and designer for Alien Workshop in 1998 – then a burgeoning skateboard and apparel company where creativity and originality were paramount. He spent the better part of a decade establishing the company’s visual identity, and Alien Workshop quickly became one of the most popular skateboard companies in the world. From 2005-2009, Pendleton spearheaded the creative and marketing team of skateboarding giant, Element Skateboards, from his home base in Dayton, Ohio. He is currently a freelance commercial and fine artist whose client list includes Zero Skateboards, LG Electronics, Mountain Dew, Gatorade, Pearl Jam, Nike 6.0, and DC Shoes, among many others.

Pendleton’s paintings, prints and design work have been exhibited in group and solo shows around the globe, and featured in magazines such as Juxtapoz, Transworld, The Skateboard Mag, and other print and online publications. He has also participated in many live painting events throughout the U.S. and Europe. In 2009, a documentary film titled, “Little Giants” chronicled his life and work. When not traveling, Pendleton can be found painting in his studio, riding his skateboard, or in front of a computer working on graphics for his recently resurrected company, Darkroom.

This exhibit is generously presented by Paris Signs and sponsored by Bulldog Creative Services.

The Walter Gropius Master Artist Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition, as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

e awards ceremony and opening reception for Portfolio 2014 will take place Saturday, April 12, at 2 p.m.

Every spring HMA hosts an exhibition of art from the middle schools and high schools in our Tri-State area of West Virginia, Kentucky and Ohio. This event, called Portfolio, is very special for students and art teachers. Students are delighted to have their work displayed in a museum. When they attend the opening, often with parents and family members, they are so pleased and proud of their accomplishments.

Teachers also experience pride and gratification when they see the culmination of the work they have imparted toward their students. An added bonus to all of these good feelings is that there are monetary awards. A Professor of Art from Marshall University carefully views and judges all of the work, selecting the 13 award winners. This is a challenging task, taking time and consideration, since there are usually about 180 to 200 works of art in Portfolio. There are eight recognition awards of $25 each; four excellence awards of $50 each and one award for $100, the Janet Bromley Excellence in the Arts Award. These award winners are announced, recognized and congratulated at the opening reception. In addition, the judge delivers a PowerPoint presentation which is intended to give further learning and insight for students and teachers.

Counties that participate in the Tri-State area are: Cabell, Putnam, Jackson, Wayne, Lincoln, Mingo and Mason in West Virginia; Lawrence in Ohio; and Boyd and Greenup in Kentucky.

This exhibit is presented by Marshall University College of Arts and Media; and sponsored by the West Virginia Division of Culture and History; and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Marshall University College of Arts and Media Presents: Portfolio 2014

Studio Selections

April 22 - April 27, 2014

Studio Selections is a celebration!

The opening reception for this exhibit takes place from 6 to 7 p.m. April 22, 2014.

Every spring HMA’s classes and workshop participants exhibit their work in HMA’s Virginia Van Zandt Great Hall. This is a great occasion for artists to display the work they have accomplished during the year. Classes offered at HMA include pottery, photography, drawing, water color and Photoshop®.

Studio Selections

Hung Liu will speak about her work at 7 p.m. March 27, 2014. Admission is free. A reception follows. Hung Liu will conduct a three-day workshop at HMA titled ” Self-Portraits and Selfies” from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 28-30, 2014. Call (304) 529-2701 for workshop fee information or to register.

Hung Liu currently lives in Oakland, California, and is a tenured professor of painting at Mills College. She has received numerous awards, grants and recognitions throughout her career, including two Painting Fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts. Her work has been exhibited around the world and resides in the permanent collections of many prestigious institutions, including Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art and Design, Kansas City, Missouri; Los Angeles County Museum of Art, California; National Museum of American Art, Washington, D.C.; Oakland Museum of California; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, California; San Jose Museum of Art, California; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota; The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among many others. She is represented by multiple prominent galleries, including the Nancy Hoffman Gallery, New York, New York.

One of the first Chinese artists to study in the United States, Hung Liu is widely regarded for a vast and innovative body of highly evocative paintings, murals, drawings, printmaking and installation. Characterized by the expressive, painterly effects of Western Modernism and Chinese decorative motifs, her work is richly layered. She frequently references anonymous historical photographs of China and, with deft technique, breathes new life into individuals lost in the sweep of history, particularly Chinese women, children, refugees, peasants, prostitutes and soldiers. In essence, Liu turns old photographs into new paintings, liberated from the rigid methodology of socialist realism – the style in which she was trained – by merging both Eastern and Western traditions. Over the years, Liu has incorporated more and more paint drips into her work, achieved by thinning the pigments with linseed oil. Gravity, her “sacred collaborator”, pulls the paint downward and divides the composition in interesting, unpredictable ways. This effect simultaneously unifies and dissolves the photo-based imagery, suggesting the passage of memory into history.

The Walter Gropius Master Artist Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition, as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

Art created by non-academic artists has always been hard to characterize – and perhaps that is a good thing. There have never been clear-cut lines in art especially in the areas of craft, illustration, photography, vernacular furniture, and so on. Art historians are quick to categorize with “isms” and “idioms.” Art that doesn’t fit concisely into these labels can often be new and refreshing.

Whatever the label, there is a rich tradition (of what we will call folk art, for simplicity’s sake), in the Appalachian region. The permanent collection of the Huntington Museum of Art includes more than 200 outstanding examples of paintings, drawings, sculpture, textiles and “eccentric” or vernacular furniture by self-taught artists including Edgar and Donny Tolson, Shields Landon Jones, Garland and Minnie Adkins, Dilmus Hall, Evan Decker, Charlie Kinney, Linvel Barker, Jimmy Lee Sudduth, “The Baltimore Glass Man”, Reverend Howard Finster and others.

The bulk of this rich collection is made up of works created by artists from Kentucky, West Virginia, and other Southern Appalachian states. Most of these were acquired by the Museum in the 1980s and 1990s, and the Museum is still adding to this collection. A number of these artists, including Evan Decker, S.L. Jones, Minnie Adkins, and Charley and Noah Kinney are represented by a large numbers of objects.

The collection also has many excellent 19thcentury folk art examples of paintings, sculpture and textiles, including works by Sala Bosworth, Susannah F. Nicholson, Asa Ames, and Eliza Isabella Means Seaton, which will also be part of the exhibition.

This exhibit is generously sponsored by the Katherine & Herman Pugh Exhibitions Endowment; Robert D. Olson In Honor of Barack Obama, for Fulfilling the American Dream; and West Virginia Division of Culture and History; and National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Courtyard Series: Aaron Kent: Bones

October 26 - March 16, 2014

This will be the second sculpture exhibit, part of an ongoing series in the Virginia Cavendish Courtyard, which presents work by emerging artists from the region. This fall an installation titled Bones by Cincinnati-based artist Aaron Kent will be on view. Kent graduated with a BFA in sculpture from the Art Academy of Cincinnati, and then worked for seven years at Casting Arts and Technology in Cincinnati, gaining practical experience in mold making, bronze casting, and metal fabrication. Kent works in other media as well, especially printmaking, painting and performance art. In 2011 he established DIY Printing, one of the few artist run printmaking co-ops in Cincinnati. His latest sculpture series titled Bones, reflects on death and the body’s spiritual connection to the circle of life. In a statement about the series he wrote:

Bones are symbolic of death and our mortality. They are the last things left of any human or animal. In many societies bones are connected with religious beliefs, secret societies and sometimes evil. Often people think of them as grotesque and are repelled by the sight of them, whether real or in art. In fact, bones are the basis of our bodies, the structure that supports it, and they become the reminders of a life after the rest of the body has decomposed.

In creating the Bones series of sculptures, I hope to expand the symbolism of bones. I want to connect them to life and nature and to demonstrate the gift given back to nature. It was and still is important for people to connect the cycle of life with bones and to realize their beauty and gift to the earth. In order to create this message it is important to take the sculptures out of the galleries and place them in settings where they might normally be found.

- ;Aaron Kent

This exhibit is generously sponsored by the Katherine & Herman Pugh Exhibitions Endowment; West Virginia Division of Culture and History; and National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Courtyard Series: Aaron Kent: Bones

In 2008, the Huntington Museum of Art was selected as the sole institution in the state of West Virginia to receive a gift of 50 works of art from New York collectors Dorothy and Herbert Vogel, with the help of the National Gallery of Art, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The gifts to HMA are part of a larger, national gifts program titled The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States, which has distributed 2,500 works from the Vogels’ collection of contemporary art throughout the nation, with 50 works going to a selected art institution in each of the 50 states. The best-known aspects of the Vogel Collection are minimal and conceptual art, but the works donated to HMA also explore numerous directions of the post-minimalist period, including works of a figurative and expressionist nature.

The Vogel Collection has become characterized as unique among collections of contemporary art, both for the character and breadth of the objects and for the individuals who created it. Herbert Vogel (1922-2012), spent most of his working life as an employee of the United States Postal Service, and Dorothy Vogel (b. 1935), was a reference librarian at the Brooklyn Public Library. Setting their collecting priorities above those of personal comfort, the couple used Dorothy’s salary to cover the expenses of daily life and devoted Herbert’s salary to the acquisition of contemporary art. They spent their free time attending art openings, and getting to know young artists whose work interested them. Usually they purchased work directly from the artists themselves, and continued to follow the careers of artists they supported. Their one bedroom apartment became legendary; so full of art it was close to becoming uninhabitable for lack of space.

To view the collection and learn more about the Vogels, go to http://vogel5050.org.

Fifty Works for Fifty States is a joint initiative of the Trustees of the Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection and the National Gallery of Art, with the generous support of the National Endowment for the Arts and the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

This exhibition is made possible, in part, by grants from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts. Additional support is provided by the Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

Opening event takes place at 7 p.m. November 2, 2013, with a concert by Simon Shaheen. A reception follows sponsored by Melanie Mansour in Memory of Michael Mansour. Admission is free.

The November Tuesday Tour takes place at 7 p.m. November 26, 2013, with a Gallery Walk led by Dr. Clay McNearney and Dr. Jeff Ruff, both of Marshall University’s Department of Religious Studies.

The Huntington Museum of Art, in an exclusive partnership with the Telfair Museums in Savannah, Georgia, brings you the exhibit Visions of the Prophet: The Visual Art of Kahlil Gibran This collection of works by the Lebanese-born, visionary artist and writer Kahlil Gibran (1883-1931) includes 96 drawings, watercolors, and paintings. Beloved worldwide for his writings, his visual art is less known, ironic since it was visual art that he pursued first. Gibran is best known for his book titled The Prophet, a collection of 26 philosophical essays that became one of the top-selling books of the twentieth century. Since it was first published in 1923,The Prophet has never been out of print, and has been translated into 40 languages. The book was especially popular during the 1960s with followers of the American counterculture and New Age movements.

Inspired by painters from the Renaissance, the Pre-Raphaelites, the French Symbolists, and others, such as visionary William Blake, Gibran sought to express symbolic ideas about life, humanity, and the interconnectedness of all things in his own unique way. These works span his career and include early works from his first exhibition at photographer Fred Holland Day’s studio in Boston in 1904, to works created during the last years of his life, including six works used as illustrations in his last book The Garden of the Prophet. All the pieces on view come from the personal collection of Gibran’s patron Mary Haskell who donated her collection to the Telfair Museums in 1950. They provide a survey of Gibran’s career as a visual artist, document his relationship with Mary Haskell, and substantiate his literary career with examples of several drawings and watercolors used as illustrations for six of his English-written books. The exhibit also includes self-portraits by Gibran, an early oil portrait of Gibran by Lilla Cabot Perry and photographs of Gibran and his New York studio.

Tania Sammons, Curator at the Telfair Museums, and organizer of this exhibit has written extensively about Mary Haskell and Kahlil Gibran. She writes the following about the work of Gibran, “Through oil, watercolor, pencil, pen, pastel, gouache, or some variation thereof, Gibran sought to evoke the essence of life. He wanted to elevate humanity through his work and share his ideas about the connectedness of all things. He wanted to inspire and stretch the imaginations of his audiences, if they so choose to be open to his message of oneness. In his visual work and his writing, Gibran provided a first step into a spiritual understanding of life.”

The exhibit will be accompanied by a catalogue with essays by Tania Sammons and Dr. Suheil Bushrui, the University of Maryland’s George and Lisa Zakhem Kahlil Gibran Chair for Values and Peace.

This exhibit is generously sponsored by Jean E. Ripley; American Task Force for Lebanon; Joseph Assaley and Renee Domanico; The Edmund George Family; Dr. & Mrs. Lee C. Haikal; George and Gloria Hanna; The Herald-Dispatch; Kfeirian Reunion Foundation, Inc.; Margaret Mary Layne in Memory of Tom Sadler;Melanie Mansour in Memory of Michael Mansour; Marshall University Division of Multicultural Affairs; Edward M. Rahal; Dr. Richard and Eleanor Rashid; Mr. and Mrs. Andrew K. Teeter; Joseph and Omayma Touma; Larry and Cheryl Tweel in Memory of James A. Tweel and in Honor of Sally R. Tweel; West Virginia Division of Culture and History; & National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

This program is presented with support from the West Virginia Department of Education and the Arts.

The Closing Reception for The Art of Teaching Art: Marshall University Visual Art Faculty Show takes place on January 31, 2014, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Admission is free. Refreshments will be served. The exhibit is scheduled to run at HMA from November 23, 2013, through Feb. 2, 2014.

This fall, the Huntington Museum of Art and the visual arts faculty from the Marshall University College of Arts and Media (formerly called the College of Fine Arts) will join hands to present The Art of Teaching Art. At the time of this writing, twenty-one artists plan to participate in the show, including both full-time and adjunct professors. Media represented will range from sculpture, drawing, prints, paintings, textiles, and video/animation.

The College of Arts and Media is on the eve of an exciting year of changes. Construction is under way converting the building that once held the former Stone & Thomas Department Store on 3rdAvenue (across from Pullman Square) into a state-of-the-art Visual Arts Center. When renovations are complete (slated for fall 2014), the center will house studios, labs and classrooms on the upper floors, and retail and gallery space on the ground floor. Come to see the creativity alive and well on campus, in central downtown Huntington, and up on the hill.

This exhibit is generously sponsored by the Marshall University College of Arts and Media; the Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment; West Virginia Division of Culture and History; and National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Art on a Limb

November 26 - January 5, 2014

HMA celebrates the holidays with a creative exhibit that fills the museum with handmade works of art by area artists and artist groups. Holiday trees are placed in different gallery spaces throughout the museum, with handmade decorations adorning the boughs. Be sure to come visit and enjoy Art on a Limb!

This exhibit will be on view during Holiday Open House, which runs from 1 to 4:30 p.m. Sunday, December 1, 2013, at HMA. Holiday Open House features music and dance performances by local groups, a visit from Santa Claus, children’s art activities and refreshments. Admission is free, but please bring nonperishable food for the Huntington Area Food Bank and warm clothes for the Cridlin Food & Clothing Pantry.

Art on a Limb