Pilgrim Cameo Glass from the Touma Collection

January 19 - November 17, 2013

In 2011, Drs. Joseph B. and Omayma Touma donated 41 pieces of Pilgrim Cameo Glass to the Huntington Museum of Art. This gift came on the heels of another generous donation by the Toumas of 100 pieces of Pilgrim Cameo to Marshall University’s Drinko Library. That collection is currently on permanent view on the 2nd floor reading room. The Toumas began collecting Pilgrim Cameo glass in the 1990s not only for its beauty but for the purpose of preserving the legacy of cameo glass production in the Huntington region, which became their adopted home in 1971.

Pilgrim Glass Corporation was established in Ceredo, W.Va., in 1949 by Alfred Knobler, and it became known for its many rare colors of glass, especially cranberry. In 1987, Kelsey Murphy and Robert Bomkamp joined the company and soon began experimenting with the cameo glass technique. In the 14 remaining years of glass production at Pilgrim (the factory closed in 2001), Murphy and Bomkamp created hundreds of designs and pioneered a new tradition of “American Super Cameo.” Murphy and Bomkamp continue to design and produce cameo glass in their home studio.

Cameo glass was first created in ancient Rome in the 1st century AD. Only 15 complete pieces of this ancient glass have survived. The technique was used in Islamic art in the 9th and 10th centuries, but was then lost until the early 18th century when the Chinese began to make opaque glass with carved designs in relief, known as “Peking glass.” By the late 18th century glass manufacturers in Germany, England, and later in France began perfecting the art of cameo glass. The technique involves casing one color over another, then carving (using hand-cutting tools, engraving wheels, acid or sand-blasting), which exposes the various layers of color beneath. Murphy and Bomkamp have cased as many as 12 layers of color on one vessel.

The Toumas have been patrons of the Huntington Museum of Art for decades, best known for their donation of more than 400 works of Near Eastern Art to the Museum between the years 1991 and 2004. They also donated the funds to construct a gallery to display this collection and in 2010 financed a beautiful catalogue of the Touma Near Eastern Collection. After falling in love with Pilgrim cameo glass and amassing a collection, as before, they wished to share these beautiful objects with the public. A selection of the 41 Pilgrim Cameo glass pieces will be on view in the Museum’s Glass Gallery through November 17, 2013.

This exhibit is sponsored by the Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment; the West Virginia Division of Culture and History; and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

The opening reception for Population by Walter Gropius Master Artist Ray Turner takes place at 7 p.m. Friday, October 18, 2013, with a public presentation by Ray Turner followed by a reception. Admission is free. A three-day workshop facilitated by Ray Turner takes place 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, October 18, 2013, through Sunday, October 20, 2013. For workshop fee information or to register, call (304) 529-2701.

Once reserved for society’s elite, the art of portraiture is revitalized by Ray Turner, who invites viewers to contemplate identity from an individual and collective standpoint.Population is a unique and expanding series of portraits that celebrates a cross-section of people from across the country – including our own community. Portraits of several Huntingtonians are intermixed with selected paintings from the larger, ongoing series in a large-scale installation. Primarily executed with oil paint on 12 x 12” glass, Turner’s textural paintings are fluid, much like notions of identity. Interpretive rather than purely representational, they emphasize elements such as color, value and composition, and reveal the inner essence and character of his subjects.

Population entices the viewer to decipher each sitter individually – the facial features, expressions, and emotions as captured in Turner’s sculptural brushwork – as well as search for relationships across the entire group of works. As the exhibition evolves with the addition of new portraits from different communities, the body of work will increasingly reflect the nation’s cultural makeup as well as the complex and changing nature of “place”. Good Man, Bad Man, a subset of the original Population project, explores both sides of our human nature through expressive, imaginative portraiture, and speaks to the perpetual contest between good and evil.

Ray Turner received a Bachelor of Fine Art degree in 1985, from the Art Center College of Design, Pasadena, CA, where he subsequently taught for 13 years as a professor of painting and drawing. In 2009, Population was shown for the first time at the Pasadena Museum of California Art. It began a national tour that year, and has been exhibited at the Long Beach Museum of Art, (CA), Akron Art Museum (OH), Whatcom Museum (WA), Museum of Glass (WA), Alexandria Museum of Art (LA), and Wichita Art Museum (KS). Now at the Huntington Museum of Art (West Virginia), 2013, Population will continue to tour through 2019. Ray Turner lives and works in Pasadena, California.

The exhibit is accompanied by a catalogue with essays by Peter Frank, Mitchell Kahan, Ph.D., Susan Warner, Barbara Matilsky, Patricia Leach, and Ray Turner.

Population is generously sponsored by Jeff Markley, The Markley Group, Dottie and Bob King, Thrive Foundation for Youth.

The Walter Gropius Master Artist Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition, as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

The Walter Gropius Master Artist public presentation by Lisa Orr takes place at 7 p.m. Thursday, September 12, 2013. A reception follows. Admission is free. A three-day workshop facilitated by Lisa Orr takes place 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, September 13, 2013, through Sunday, September 15, 2013. For workshop fee information or to register, call (304) 529-2701.

Best presented with a lovely meal, Lisa Orr’s artworks for the dinner table often refer to traditional porcelain whitewares, but with softer, highly decorated forms that echo the playful qualities of Mexican earthenware. Solid and strong yet fluid and detailed, Orr’s work plays both ends of the spectrum. After studying clay mold fragments in museums and antiquated factories, Orr invented her own eclectic production process that combines molding, wheel throwing and surface decoration. Inspired by the abundance of nature, she imaginatively textures her work with stamps, slips and sprigs. A multihued palette of glazes uniquely enlivens each piece.

Lisa Orr received a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the University of Texas at Austin in 1983. Following several years of apprenticeships, workshops and post-baccalaureate study, she earned a Master of Fine Arts degree in 1992 from the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University. Orr has received numerous grants, fellowships and awards, including a Fulbright Fellowship to study Bulgarian and Macedonian village ceramics (1992-94). Her work is represented by several prominent ceramics galleries across the country, and in numerous private and public collections such as the Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco, the American Museum of Ceramic Art, and the San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts. Orr co-founded the Austin-based Art of the Pot studio tour, now in its tenth year, and is a steadfast advocate for the art of studio pottery. She also researched and produced three documentary DVDs about Mexican Folk pottery.Orr is a multifaceted entrepreneur who, like so many potters today, explores several revenue streams that collectively allow her to remain focused on creative endeavors. She currently operates a studio in Austin, Texas, and divides her time between studio practice, teaching ceramics lessons, workshop travel, family and maintaining her organic garden.

The Walter Gropius Master Artist Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition, as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

The Walter Gropius Master Artist public presentation by Buzz Spector takes place at 7 p.m. Thursday, September 26, 2013. A reception follows. Admission is free. A three-day workshop facilitated by Buzz Spector takes place 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, September 27, 2013, through Sunday, September 29, 2013. For workshop fee information or to register, call (304) 529-2701.

An internationally recognized artist and critical writer, Buzz Spector works in a wide range of mediums including sculpture, installation, photography, printmaking, and book arts. His work makes frequent use of the book, both as subject and as object, and concerns the relationships between public history, individual memory and perception. Spector has meticulously torn, cut and painted the pages of hundreds of books to create cascading images within their bindings; the intent is not to destroy, but to transform books and language. In addition to altering books in the name of art, Spector has produced a few of his own since the mid-1970s. Buzzwords, published in 2012 by Chicago-based Sara Ranchouse Publishing, features six interviews spanning nearly 30 years and showcases his ideas about art, books, libraries and his own history of reading. Other titles include Time Square, a limited-edition letterpress book, published in 2007 by Pyracantha Press, whose text is taken from a sequence of Google searches on the nature of time.

A native of Chicago, Franklin “Buzz” Spector received a bachelor’s degree in art from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale in 1972, and a master of fine arts degree from the Committee of Art and Design at the University of Chicago in 1978, combining studies in art and philosophy. Spector’s work has been shown in numerous museums and galleries, among them the Art Institute of Chicago, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Mattress Factory in Pittsburgh, PA, and the Luigi Pecci Center for Contemporary Art in Prato, Italy. The recipient of several awards and fellowships, Spector was honored with an Artist’s Fellowship from the New York Foundation for the Arts (2005), a Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Award (1991), a Visual Artist’s Fellowship from the Illinois Arts Council (1988) and three fellowship awards from the National Endowment for the Arts (1991, 1985 and 1982). Spector was a co-founder of WhiteWalls, a magazine of writings by artists, in Chicago in 1978, and served as the publication’s editor until 1987. Since then he has written extensively on topics in contemporary art and culture, and has contributed reviews and essays to a number of publications, including American Craft, Artforum, Art Issues, Art on Paper, Exposure, and New Art Examiner. Spector is dean of the College and Graduate School of Art and the Jane Reuter Hitzeman and Herbert F. Hitzeman, Jr. Professor of Art for the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri.
The Walter Gropius Master Artist Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition, as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

Running through October 20, 2013,Huntington Federal Savings Bank Presents: Mr. Fitz: Celebrating the 60thAnniversary of the Huntington Museum of Art marks 60 years of bringing art to the Tri-State community. This extended exhibition, which opened October 20, 2012, and took a small break from February 3-22, 2013, presents selected highlights from the more than 425 works donated by the late Herbert Fitzpatrick.

It was Herbert Fitzpatrick along with other visionaries who in 1947 began discussing the idea of a cultural center or museum in Huntington. Mr. Fitzpatrick jumpstarted the project with the donation of 52 acres for a site to erect an art gallery to store his collection, as well as provide for an arboretum, bird sanctuary and nature trails. The Huntington Galleries (now known as the Huntington Museum of Art) opened in 1952.

Fitzpatrick was an avid art collector and had a great eye for beauty in many guises. His tastes in art were wide-ranging, from British silver from the Georgian period, Near Eastern prayer rugs, fine European and American paintings, sculpture, drawings and prints, and Asian decorative arts.

For the past two years the Museum’s Archivist/Librarian Chris Hatten has been researching Herbert Fitzpatrick and the early years of the Museum. Photographs, videos and ephemera from the Library archives and new material collected during his research will be on view in a portion of the gallery. A limited edition book about Herbert Fitzpatrick and the founding of the Museum written by Chris Hatten will accompany this exhibit.

This exhibit is sponsored by Huntington Federal Savings Bank; Huddleston Bolen LLP, in Memory of Herbert Fitzpatrick; Jenkins Fenstermaker, PLLC, in loving memory of Norman K. Fenstermaker; Carl F. Frischkorn in Memory of Permele Francis Booth; Donald Egnor in Memory of Helen H. Crissey; In Memory of Major Henry Dourif; In Memory of Roberta S. Emerson, from her Loving Children; In Memory of Janet W. Ford from her Family; Camille M. Riley in Memory of John E. Jenkins, Jr.; Todd McCreight & Cathie Lutter and Matthew McCreight & Kathryn Greene-McCreight in memory of Betsy K. and Paul W. McCreight; Thomas F. Scott in Memory of Elizabeth T. Scott; Nada (Nico) and Barney Francis in Memory of Jack and Nada Steelman; Woody & Nancy Jane Van Zandt Bolton and Caroline Van Zandt Windsor in Memory of Virginia Kitchen and Richard K. Van Zandt; In Memory of Jeanne and Robert Wulfman; The Isabelle Gwynn & Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment; West Virginia Division of Culture and History; National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

The permanent collection of the Huntington Museum of Art contains a little more than 90 photographs ranging from an early daguerreotype from the 1850s to digital images from the 21st century. The acquisition of photography was not a focus for the Museum until the 1970s when a large number of photographs came into the collection through purchase awards from the Museum’s regional juriedExhibition 280; purchases with funds provided by the West Virginia Arts and Humanities; and through individual gifts.

The photos selected for this exhibit date from the 1970s, a time of great experimentation in the medium. In these photographs one can see the same trends and artistic styles being explored in other areas of the fine arts such as painting and sculpture making their way into photography such as conceptualism, minimalism, abstraction, and magic realism.

Photography has been taken seriously as a fine art medium since the turn of the 20thcentury. However, in the 1970s it enjoyed widespread visibility in galleries and museum exhibitions. No longer was photography thought of as only a “documentary” medium, rather it became manipulated in all stages of creativity from conception, composition, and processing. And even though artists were still working with the limitations of film techniques (as opposed to today’s digital capabilities and Photoshop manipulations), artists could create and select the reality they wished to capture or present.

This exhibit is sponsored by the Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment; the West Virginia Division of Culture and History; and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

The opening event for this exhibit takes place at HMA from 6 to 8 p.m. June 22, 2013, with a short video about the artists by Brad Boston presented on the big screen in the Grace Rardin Doherty Auditorium followed by a Meet-the-Artists Reception. Admission is free.

To celebrate West Virginia’s sesquicentennial, the Huntington Museum of Art has organized a small invitational exhibit. All of the 18 participating artists teach in West Virginia colleges and universities, affording them a unique viewpoint in that they work closely with West Virginia students from a variety of backgrounds and places within the state.

This exhibit will present many artistic viewpoints – not only in style (traditional vs. cutting edge contemporary) and chosen media (painting, drawing, sculpture, printmaking, photography, video, etc.), but also in the amount of time the artist has spent in the state absorbing “a sense of place.” Many of the invited artists were born, reared, and have always lived in West Virginia, however, some are recent (and not-so-recent) transplants from other states and other countries.

We asked each invited artist to create a work in their preferred medium and in their unique personal style using “sense of place” as a broad guide, referring to this theme as an intensely personal response to the environment, both social and natural, which the individual experiences in daily life. This sense can also refer to the individual’s perception of the whole state, and their feelings, attitudes, and influences living, working, and residing in West Virginia.

It is another way for the Museum to support West Virginia artists, expand our visitors’ knowledge and familiarity of artists working within the state and it is a wonderful way for the Museum to celebrate the 150thanniversary of West Virginia’s statehood.

Artists who will be participating are: Christian Benefiel, Shepherd University; James Biggs, Concord University; Andy Bloxham, West Virginia Wesleyan College; Jennifer Boggess, Fairmont State University; Liza Brenner, Glenville State College; Michael Doig, Davis & Elkins College; Molly S. Erlandson, West Virginia State University; Sonya Evanisko, Shepherd University; James Haizlett, West Liberty University; Hayson Harrison, Marshall University; Grant Johnson, Alderson-Broaddus College; Natalie Larsen, Marshall University; Peter Massing, Marshall University; Mark Tobin Moore, Concord University; Kenneth Morgan, Bethany College; Erika Osborne, West Virginia University; Dr. Reidun Ovrebo, West Virginia State University; and Michael Sherwin, West Virginia University.

Jenine Culligan, organizing curator, will visit each artist’s studio, as will Education Assistant Brad Boston, who will create a travelogue of his journey, documenting his visit to studios, schools and towns throughout the state.

This exhibit is presented by Macy’s Foundation; and sponsored by the Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment; the West Virginia Division of Culture and History; and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts. This program is presented with support from the West Virginia Department of Education and the Arts.

Vestige of a Tree

May 11 - September 1, 2013

Join us at 7 p.m. May 28, 2013, for the Fourth Tuesday Tour for a guided tour ofVestige of a Treeand a walk on the nature trail. Admission is free. Refreshments will be served. Free Tuesdays at the Huntington Museum of Art are sponsored by AT&T.

This group of disparate objects includes tools, boxes, items of personal adornment, walking sticks/canes, dolls, furniture, ritual masks, a musical instrument, firearms, and sculpture. All began life as a tree, then a piece of wood, then an object, and now a work on exhibit in a museum! All employ wood as the main material, and all have been manipulated by artists and craftsmen for their own use – aesthetic or otherwise.

An artist’s mind is a unique and wonderful thing. If you gave 30 artists a piece of wood, and tell them to go away and make something, each artist will create something completely different. The idea behind this exhibit is taking one material – wood – and exploring the diverse outcome of both necessity and creativity – exploring a readily available, organic material, its qualities, scale and possibilities by artists and craftsmen from around the world.

This exhibit is sponsored by The Katherine & Herman Pugh Exhibitions Endowment;the West Virginia Division of Culture and History; and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Public Presentation takes place at 7 p.m. May 23, 2013. Admission is free.

Workshop Searching For Simplicity - Making the Quietest Pots with the Loudest Voicestakes place 9 a.m.-4 p.m. May 24-26, 2013. Call (304) 529-2701 for workshop fee information.

Robert Briscoe was born in Kansas City, Kansas, in 1947, and has worked as a studio potter since 1967. He apprenticed with functional potter James Vandergriff in Zarah, KS (1967-68) and later received a Bachelor of Science in economics from Kansas State University (1980). Briscoe was a founding member of the Upper St. Croix Valley Pottery Tour – now an annual destination for collectors nationwide – and remains one of the event’s principal organizers. He has received awards including a McKnight Artist Fellowship (2001 and 2007) and a grant from the Jerome Foundation (1987). Briscoe has lectured and conducted ceramics workshops across the country. His work has been featured in Ceramics Monthly,American Craft, and The Art of Contemporary Pottery. He is represented in public collections such as the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Renwick Gallery (Washington, D.C.); the Weisman Art Museum, University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, MN); Arizona State University Art Museum (Tempe, AZ); and numerous private collections around the world. He lives and works on 31 acres of woods and fields in Harris, Minnesota.

Preparing and serving food to family and friends remains one of the last true rituals in the modern age. For more than 40 years, Robert Briscoe’s functional pottery has explored the powerful link between maker and user by emphasizing the integral role that handmade ceramic objects play in savoring some of life’s richest experiences. Within this time-honored tradition, function is paramount and craft truly matters – and it is to these useful, “honest” ends that Briscoe aspires. His generously proportioned, wheel thrown stoneware pots reflect a quiet simplicity, their strength derived through nuance, subtle expression, and unhindered use. His ceramic forms are spare, often asymmetrical, with heavy textures and weighty bases. Rims and attachments such as lips, handles and knobs are substantially shaped with a rounded thickness that invites the viewer to sip from and cook in Briscoe’s works. Although uncomplicated by decoration, a muted palette of white, honey, rust and olive green ash glazes integrate form and surface and further enliven the work.

The Walter Gropius Master Artists Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

Public Presentation takes place at 7 p.m. March 15, 2013. Admission is free.

WorkshopZine Extravaganzatakes place 9 a.m.- 4 p.m. March 15-17, 2013. Call (304) 529-2701 for workshop fee information.

Kate Bingaman-Burt is an illustrator and educator who makes piles of work about consumerism and consumer culture. As an undergraduate, Bingaman-Burt double-majored in English and Studio Art at the College of the Ozarks (Point Lookout, Missouri) and received a bachelor’s degree in 2000. She earned an MFA from the University of Nebraska (Lincoln, Nebraska) in 2004, and is currently an Assistant Professor of Graphic Design at Portland State University (Portland, Oregon).

As an illustrator, Bingaman-Burt happily thinks and draws for other good people and companies. Her growing list of regional, national and international design clients includes VH1, Target, Girl Scouts of America, Hallmark and the Gap as well as locally loved institutions such the Museum of Contemporary Craft, Reading Frenzy and The Dill Pickle Club. She also actively exhibits her continuing research about consumption and human behavior in museums, galleries, storefronts and community spaces. Her first book,Obsessive Consumption: What Did You Buy Today?, was published by Princ­eton Architectural Press in 2010 and her second book,What Did I Buy Today?, will be released this spring. Since 2007, Bingaman-Burt’s work has been represented by Jen Bekman Gallery, New York City, NY.

Bingaman-Burt is incredibly versatile as a visual artist, employing drawing, typography, painting, photography, crafts and graphic design in service to a central theme. She makes drawings, zines, dresses, photos and paper chains about personal consumerism, market economies, guilt, joy, excess, gifts, celebration, repetition and the community of these shared experiences. These works cheerfully and critically document ordinary and mass-produced objects such as Coke cans, Post-it notes, toilet bowl cleaner – miscellaneous items that we interact with but often do not think about. Other series investigate mix tapes, stolen goods, passwords and yard sale signs. On February 5, 2006, Bingaman-Burt began making drawings that document something she purchased that day – and the project is still ongoing …

The Walter Gropius Master Artists Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

Portfolio 2013

April 20 - May 19, 2013

Opening reception and awards ceremony take place at 2 p.m. April 20, 2013. Admission is free.

This exhibit highlights the work of middle school and high school art students and their teachers from West Virginia, Kentucky and Ohio.

Portfolio 2013 is generously funded by the Marshall University College of Fine Arts.

Portfolio 2013

Public Presentation takes place at 7 p.m. March 22, 2013. Admission is free.

WorkshopStep-by-Step Process for Effective Illustration takes place 9 a.m.-4 p.m. March 22-24, 2013. Call (304) 529-2701 for workshop fee information.

One of America’s foremost contemporary artist-illustrators, Chris “C.F.” Payne received a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, in 1976 and further honed his skills at the Illustrators Workshop in Tarrytown, N.Y. Payne began his freelance career in 1980 and is currently based in his hometown of Cincinnati, Ohio, where he settled after sojourns to studios in Akron, Chicago and Dallas. Payne’s illustrations have been featured on the covers of Readers Digest, Time Magazine, The New York Times Book Review, The Atlantic Monthly, U.S. News and World Report, Sports Illustrated, Boys Life, MAD Magazineand der Spiegel. He has been commissioned to paint countless politicians, authors and entertainers, and has illustrated 10 children’s picture books, including The Remarkable Farkle McBride and Micawber, written by John Lithgow. Payne is a Professor of Illustration and Chair of Graduate Studies at the Columbus College of Art and Design.

Over the course of his prolific career, Payne has received national recognition from distinguished organizations such as the Society of Illustrators, the Society of Publication Designers, Communication Arts, and publications such as Print Magazine, How Magazine and Illustration Magazine. His work garnered Gold and Silver awards from the Society of Illustrators of both New York and Los Angeles, and he received the Hamilton King Award – one of the industry’s most prestigious – from the Society of Illustrators of New York. Payne has exhibited work in the National Portrait Gallery (Washington, D.C.), the National Academy Museum (New York, N.Y.), the Norman Rockwell Museum (Stockbridge, MA), Cincinnati Art Museum (Cincinnati, OH) and numerous college and university galleries such as the Selby Gallery at the Ringling College of Art and Design (Sarasota, FL).

Often compared to legendary illustrator Norman Rockwell (1894-1978), Payne’s wide-ranging ability enables him to cover a range of subjects in multiple markets, seriously as well as irreverently. Much of Payne’s commercial work depicts everyday life and references collective American experiences. Like Rockwell, he displays a keen emotional sensitivity conveyed through subtleties of gesture and expression. Although naturally inclined to humor and caricature, his highly realistic renditions make the exaggerations convincingly real. Despite the increasing role of digital technology in the field, Payne works with traditional media using time-honored drawing and painting techniques. His approach is unusual, though, as he applies layers of acrylic paint and Prismacolor pencil over an oil-based wash. While the wash is still wet, Payne begins establishing value and loosely articulating the figures by wiping away areas with a rag. The initial oil underpainting gives the work a uniform tone and is sealed with photographer’s varnish before proceeding to successive layers.

The Walter Gropius Master Artists Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

Studio Selections

April 23 - April 28, 2013

Opening reception takes place from 6 to 7 p.m. April 23, 2013. Admission is free.

This exhibit showcases the work of participants in HMA’s studio classes.

Studio Selections

Public Presentation takes place at 7 p.m. April 4, 2013. Admission is free.

Workshop Painting and a Philosophy of Lifetakes place 9 a.m.-4 p.m. April 5-7, 2013. Call (304) 529-2701 for workshop fee information.

Internationally renowned painter and printmaker Tom Nakashima is the great-grandson of a samurai warrior and nephew of furniture legend George Nakashima. After three years of service in the 101st Airborne, Nakashima returned to his hometown of Dubuque, Iowa, where he received a bachelor’s degree from Loras College in 1965. He earned MA and MFA degrees from the University of Notre Dame in 1966 and 1967, respectively. His work has appeared in or been reviewed by hundreds of international publications including Art in America, New American Paintings,The Washington Post, The Paris Review, and Elle Magazine.

Nakashima has received numerous awards and fellowships over the course of his impressive career, including a Mid-Atlantic/National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, an Award for the Visual Arts fromThe Southeast Center for Contemporary Art, and was a 2004 national recipient of the prestigious Joan Mitchell Award for Painters and Sculptors. Nakashima is a veteran of more than 30 solo exhibitions with work found in more than 50 permanent collections across the United States and Japan, including the National Museum of American Art (Washington, D.C.), the Corcoran Gallery of Art (Washington, D.C.), and the Long Beach Museum of Art (Long Beach, CA). Nakashima is a professor emeritus of the Catholic University of America (Washington, D.C.) where he taught for more than 20 years, and most recently served as the William S. Morris Eminent Scholar in Art at Augusta State University (Augusta, GA) from 2003-2010.

Nakashima, who was born to a Japanese-American father and an Irish-Canadian mother, draws from both Eastern and Western traditions to create monumental works of art that remind us of the metaphorical power of natural forms. He is heavily influenced by philosophy and theology and well-known for his deft use of allegory and symbolism in his work. Nakashima’s “treepile” paintings – gigantic piles of tangled, twisted tree trunks and limbs – address pressing environmental concerns such as deforestation and urban sprawl, as well as his personal observances on aging. These heroic works as well as their more intimate counterparts synthesize painting techniques with recycled paper collage elements to form a fusion of subtle color and texture.

The Walter Gropius Master Artists Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

The first group exhibit of works by the French Impressionists took place in Paris, France, in 1874. Ironically, few of the American artists who later became known as American Impressionists took much notice of these exhibits while studying art in Paris. It seems hard to believe that this now famous group of artists which includes Claude Monet, Edgar Degas, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Édouard Manet, Mary Cassatt, Berthe Morisot, Alfred Sisley, Camille Pissarro and Gustave Caillebotte exhibited together only eight times, until 1886, but their painting style had a marked influence on artists around the world – and on the history of art.

Many young American artists traveled to Paris in the 1870s and 1880s, then the art capital of the world, to round out their American academic art studies, the majority at the Académie Julian.

The first American Impressionist canvases painted in the United States by repatriated artists occurred in the late 1880s (with the exception of expatriate artists John Singer Sargent and Mary Cassatt who were creating impressionist paintings earlier), following a flurry of U.S. exhibits of French Impressionist works, and the interest of a number of prominent American collectors in acquiring works by Monet, Renoir, Pissarro, Manet, Sisley and others – thus validating the style in America.

American impressionist painters often combined academic training with the more radical impressionist techniques, selecting and focusing on one or more of the tenets of impressionism such as incorporating a broken brush work, prismatic light, atmospheric and/or climate effects on an object, observing, sketching and painting out-of-doors (en plein air), or the depiction of modern subject matter – especially leisure-time activities.

The permanent collection of the Huntington Museum of Art holds a treasure trove of American Impressionist paintings. This exhibition will present these important and popular works painted by many of the best-known American impressionists including Childe Hassam, J. Alden Weir, Willard L. Metcalf, John H. Twachtman, Frank Benson, Edward Willis Redfield, W. Elmer Schofield, Arthur Meltzer, and many others.

This exhibit is sponsored by The Katherine and Herman Pugh Exhibition Endowment, West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

While many of the American impressionist works from The Daywood Collection are on view in Gallery Three inAmerican Impressionism: Paintings from the Collection (on view through April 7, 2013), the Bridge Gallery will feature an additional selection of American and French paintings from The Daywood Collection, mostly landscapes, seascapes and portraits, the favored subjects of West Virginia natives Arthur Spencer (1887-1948) and Ruth Woods Dayton (1894-1978).

Portraits include Robert Henri’s exuberantly painted work titled Kathleen, which captures a young Irish girl, from Achill Island; Charles Webster Hawthorne’s masterpiece titled The Widow, a somber, depiction of a grief-stricken woman clutching her infant; and Howard Somerville’s striking Joyce, a study in contrasts—juxtaposing a fair-skinned beauty against a study in black.

Landscapes include Les Bords de L’Eure, a prismatic-palette, impressionist painting by French artist Gustave Loiseau depicting a walk along a river in the Loire Valley, and Norwegian-born American artist Jonas Lie’s colorful and poetic view of Blue Heron Lake. John Sloan’s Gully at Low Tide shows a change from the artist’s usual gritty scenes of city life. Instead Sloan employs vigorous, textural brushstrokes influenced by his awareness of post-impressionist styles he saw at the 1913 Armory Show the year before this painting was executed.

This exhibit is sponsored by the Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment; the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

This exhibit runs October 20, 2012-February 3, 2013 AND February 23-October 20, 2013.

HMA’s 60th Anniversary Celebration begins with a Gallery Walk with Barrie Kaufman at 5:30 p.m. November 9, 2012, in conjunction with the opening for her exhibit Curator’s Choice. A reception follows. Admission is free.

Opening October 20, Huntington Federal Savings Bank Presents: Mr. Fitz: Celebrating the 60th Anniversary of the Huntington Museum of Art marks 60 years of bringing art to the Tri-State community. This extended exhibition presents selected highlights from the more than 425 works donated by the late Herbert Fitzpatrick.

It was Herbert Fitzpatrick along with other visionaries who in 1947 began discussing the idea of a cultural center or museum in Huntington. Mr. Fitzpatrick jumpstarted the project with the donation of 52 acres for a site to erect an art gallery to store his collection, as well as provide for an arboretum, bird sanctuary and nature trails. The Huntington Galleries (now known as the Huntington Museum of Art) opened in 1952.

Fitzpatrick was an avid art collector and had a great eye for beauty in many guises. His tastes in art were wide-ranging, from British silver from the Georgian period, Near Eastern prayer rugs, fine European and American paintings, sculpture, drawings and prints, and Asian decorative arts.

For the past two years the Museum’s Archivist/Librarian Chris Hatten has been researching Herbert Fitzpatrick and the early years of the Museum. Photographs, videos and ephemera from the Library archives and new material collected during his research will be on view in a portion of the gallery. A limited edition book about Herbert Fitzpatrick and the founding of the Museum written by Chris Hatten will accompany this exhibit.

This exhibit is sponsored by Huntington Federal Savings Bank; Huddleston Bolen LLP, in Memory of Herbert Fitzpatrick; Jenkins Fenstermaker, PLLC, in loving memory of Norman K. Fenstermaker; Carl F. Frischkorn in Memory of Permele Francis Booth; Donald Egnor in Memory of Helen H. Crissey; In Memory of Major Henry Dourif; In Memory of Roberta S. Emerson, from her Loving Children; In Memory of Janet W. Ford from her Family; Camille M. Riley in Memory of John E. Jenkins, Jr.; Todd McCreight & Cathie Lutter and Matthew McCreight & Kathryn Greene-McCreight in memory of Betsy K. and Paul W. McCreight; Thomas F. Scott in Memory of Elizabeth T. Scott; Nada (Nico) and Barney Francis in Memory of Jack and Nada Steelman; Woody & Nancy Jane Van Zandt Bolton and Caroline Van Zandt Windsor in Memory of Virginia Kitchen and Richard K. Van Zandt; In Memory of Jeanne and Robert Wulfman; The Isabelle Gwynn & Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment; West Virginia Division of Culture and History; National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Curator’s Choice: Barrie Kaufman

November 10 - February 3, 2013

A Gallery Walk with Barrie Kaufman takes place at 5:30 p.m. November 9, 2012, in conjunction with the opening for the exhibitMr. Fitz, which marks HMA’s 60th Anniversary Celebration. A reception follows. Admission is free.

Throughout her 35-year career of making art, Barrie Kaufman has never stopped experimenting with new techniques. Working primarily on paper, and in a series format, Kaufman explores her themes in a multitude of mediums. Her subjects are extremely personal and wide ranging. They find their way to the surface during quiet hours meditating and creating in her basement studio. Over the years, her subjects have included interpretations of stories learned while working with severely abused children during art therapy sessions; visual collaborations with the late poet Elaine Blue dealing with domestic violence, abuse, homelessness and poverty; examining gender roles with simplified dress-shapes inspired by actual 19th century dresses she researched in the collection of the West Virginia Culture Museum; and dream-like visions of nature influenced by the woods of West Virginia and Canada.

Most recently, Kaufman has been creating environmental-themed works which explore the upset balance of fragile ecosystems by big industry’s use of the environment and how this affects all of Earth’s creatures. In these woodcuts and paintings spiritual symbols and iconic figures from various religions share the page with animals, foliage and industrial machinery. This exhibit will present a selection of works from the past with emphasis on new work created in the last year. A variety of print techniques including woodcuts, carborundum prints, and silk aquatints will be on view as well as oil stick on paper, encaustic, and other media.

Barrie Kaufman has been involved with HMA for more than 30 years, participating in numerous Exhibition 280 exhibits, and receiving awards in 1990 and 2003. This will be the Museum’s fifth Curator’s Choice, a series of solo exhibitions, presenting the work of selected artists from West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky. Curator’s Choice began in 2004. To date the series has presented solo exhibitions featuring the work of Robert Hutton (2004), Paula Clendenin (2006), Darryl Halbrooks (2008), and Charles Jupiter Hamilton (2010).

Kaufman received a BA degree from Marietta College, an MA degree in Art Therapy from Wright State University, and an MA degree in Art from Marshall University. She has been in private practice as an art therapist since 1986. She has taught Art at Mountaineer Montessori School since 1989 and maintains a teaching studio in Charleston. Kaufman has had solo exhibitions of her work in the United States, Canada and Stockholm, Sweden, at Sotheby’s, and her work has been in group exhibitions in Taipei, Taiwan, Canada and throughout the United States. Honors and awards include Taipei City Mayor’s Prize, 5thInternational Print Biennial, Pressé Papier, Visiting Artist Fellowship Trois Rivieres, Quebec, Canada, West Virginia Commission on the Arts, The Painted Bride, Philadelphia PA, Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation, Kentucky Foundation for Women, the West Virginia Visual Arts Fellowship for Painting and Crafts, and many others.

Her work is in the permanent collections of the Taipei Fine Arts Museum, Taipei, Taiwan; Rutgers University, Rutgers, New Jersey; Clay Center for the Arts and Sciences; Collection of West Virginia State Museum, Charleston; Marshall University Graduate College; University of Charleston; and many others.

This exhibit is sponsored by The Bell Law Firm, PLLC; Frank Baer II and Marion Baer; Barbie and Ray Dan; Kathie Giltinan; Dr. and Mrs. Steven Jubelirer; Judge Tod J. Kaufman; Mr. and Mrs. Anthony J. Majestro; Dr. Timothy Spears, DDS and Mimi Imbrogno Spears; Liz and Louis Weisberg; Katherine Forbes Wellford; Yarid’s Inc. - Katherine & Tony Juker, Emilie & Chris Couch; The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment; West Virginia Division of Culture and History; National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Opening event takes place at 7 p.m. November 27, 2012, during the Fourth Tuesday Tour. There will be a guided tour of the exhibit and an appearance by author and local historian James E. Casto portraying Collis P. Huntington. A reception follows. Admission to this opening event is free. Free Tuesdays at the Huntington Museum of Art are sponsored by AT&T.

In the early decades of the 19th century, two new inventions changed our understanding of space and time. The railroad made it possible for people to travel well beyond a day’s walk from their home, and the photograph permitted a kind of time travel that made detailed and exact memory possible, even beyond the grave. In the United States, both the railroad and the photograph were essential to the opening of the West and the development of national identity.

A survey of images depicting railroads and images related to railroads from around the world, TRACKS: Photography and the Railroad from the George Eastman House Collection covers more than 160 years of photographic and railroad history. This exhibition will please a variety of audiences including historians, lovers of the American West, and train enthusiasts alike. The city of Huntington, founded by Collis P. Huntington as the Western terminus of the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad, is a natural fit for this traveling exhibition. Trains and the railroad still define the layout of the town and remain an important part of its identity and culture.

In this group of images, the railroad appears as technological triumph, violator of nature, symbol, myth, and nostalgic evocation of a better, nobler past. TRACKS: Photography and the Railroad from the George Eastman House Collection includes works by Bisson Frères, William Henry Jackson, Alvin Langdon Coburn, Lewis W. Hine, Aaron Siskind, and others.

This exhibition has been organized and is being circulated by George Eastman House International Museum of Photography and Film, Rochester, New York.

This exhibit is generously sponsored by the West Virginia Division of Culture and History; National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts; The Isabelle Gwynn & Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment; The Collis P. Huntington Railroad Historical Society; In Memory of Willis W. Cook; In Memory of Howard and Arthinia Ellis; In Memory of Jack and Miriam Glick; In Honor of Shelley and Tim Jackson and Brody Stewart; In Memory of Ronald C. Kyger; In Honor of Jacob Lewis, Director, Pace Prints, Chelsea New York Gallery; In Honor of Art Malcomb; In Memory of Michael L. Mansour; In Memory of Dwayne L. Payne; In Memory of Ms. Jeanne R. Poulter; In Memory of Richard O. Probst; In Honor of Mrs. Susan Shields; In Memory of Rev. Kenneth R. Stultz; and In Memory of Wilhelmine Woodyard.