The 50th anniversary of studio glass art in America is being observed in 2012. To celebrate this milestone and recognize talented artists, the Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass (AACG), a not-for-profit organization whose mission is to further the development and appreciation of art made from glass, has initiated more than 100 glass demonstrations, lectures and exhibitions that will take place in museums, galleries and art centers across the country throughout 2012. The Huntington Museum of Art will participate in this celebration with a small exhibit in the Museum’s Glass Gallery of six early glass sculptures by Harvey Littleton from the Museum’s permanent collection.

The American Studio Glass movement began with two glass workshops held at the Toledo Museum of Art in 1962. The workshops were taught by Harvey K. Littleton, who, along with scientist Dominick Labino, introduced a small furnace built for glassworking that made it possible for individual artists to work in independent studios. Glass programs were then established by Littleton at the University of Wisconsin, at the California College of the Arts by Marvin Lipofsky, and later at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), led by artist Dale Chihuly, to name but a few.

To learn more about the observations of the 50th anniversary of studio glass art in America, visithttp://contempglass.org/2012-celebration

This exhibit is sponsored by the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, West Virginia Commission on the Arts, and the Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

Public Lecture: November 1, 2012, at 7 p.m. A reception follows. Admission is free.

Workshop: Multiples, Ghosts and Clones: Mold Making for Ceramics takes place November 2-4, 2012, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. For workshop fee information or to register, call (304) 529-2701.

Renowned for her expertise in porcelain production, Katherine Ross uses ceramics as her primary medium to create site-specific installations and performances that explore obsolescence within cultural practices. In this exhibition, titled Ghost, she reflects upon the current state of the porcelain teacup and the mule as vestigial ghosts of their own histories. Porcelain teacups long held ritualistic use and conveyed status in elite society, although this has all but disappeared from contemporary culture with the introduction of plastic and disposable utilitarian ware. Likewise, the mule – one of the oldest manipulations of nature by man – was quickly rendered obsolete with the mass introduction of heavy equipment for farming, drayage and battle. Together, the porcelain teacup and the mule create a jumping off point for a more spontaneous, intuitive, and perhaps ridiculous studio production resulting in a sculptural installation that is a secondary image, or trace, of these fading icons.

Katherine Ross received a B.A. in 1976 from the State University of New York at Fredonia, and an M.F.A. from Tulsa University in 1980. She has been a faculty member at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago since 1981, and is currently the Chair of the Ceramics Department. Her work has been featured in many national and international exhibitions and installations, in venues such as Jingdezhen National Ceramic Museum (Jingdezhen, China), Sanbao Ceramic Art Museum (Jingdezhen, China), The Centers for Disease Control Museum (Atlanta, GA), the Urban Institute for Contemporary Art (Grand Rapids, Mich.), and SOFA Chicago. Ross is the recipient of many awards and grants including the Chicago Artists International Program Travel Grant, Arts Midwest/NEA Grant, Indiana State Arts Commission Master Fellowship, and a Banff Center for the Arts Residency. She has also worked with several architects, including Michael Graves, on both commercial and residential architectural projects and restorations.

The Walter Gropius Master Artists Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

Public Presentation: September 7, 2012, at 7 p.m. A reception follows. Admission is free.

Workshop: September 7-9, 2012, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call (304) 529-2701 for workshop fee information or to register for the workshop.

Equal parts fine artist and cultural anthropologist, Enrique Chagoya creates incisive social critiques from the perspective of one who has lived on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border.

Born in Mexico City in 1953, the San Francisco-based artist’s paintings, drawings and prints juxtapose secular, religious and popular symbols to explore the shifting definitions of cultural identity. Through a process he has termed “reverse anthropology,” Chagoya rewrites, redraws and collages playful and violent alternate histories that re-imagine the “official” histories written by the governing cultures or the military victors – primarily those of Europe and the United States – through the eyes of the defeated. Diverse visual materials mined from pre-Columbian mythology, Western religious iconography and American popular culture collide with ethnic stereotypes and ideological propaganda in satirical, contradictory, unexpected and sometimes controversial contexts. The result is a frenzied synthesis of both marginal and dominant viewpoints, often a non-linear narrative with many possible interpretations.

Enrique Chagoya studied political economics at the Universidad Nacional Autonóma de México, Mexico City, Mexico, before moving to the United States in 1979. He received a B.F.A. in 1984 from the San Francisco Art Institute, San Francisco, Calif. In 1986 he completed an M.A., and in 1987 an M.F.A., both from the University of California, Berkeley. Chagoyais currently a Full Professor at Stanford University’s Department of Art and Art History specializing in painting, drawing and printmaking. He is represented in numerous public collections including the Museum of Modern Art, New York, N.Y.; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y.; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, N.Y.; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, Calif.; and the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, San Francisco, Calif., among many others.

He has been the recipient of many awards such as two NEA artist fellowships; a Tiffany Fellowship; an award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters; a President’s Award for Excellence from the San Francisco Art Institute; and a grant from Artadia, to mention a few. He is represented by Gallery Paule Anglim in San Francisco, Calif.; George Adams Gallery in New York, N.Y.; and Lisa Sette Gallery in Scottsdale, Ariz. His prints are published by Shark’s Ink, Lyons, Colo.; Segura Publishing, Pueblo, Ariz.; Trillium Press, Brisbaine, Calif.; Magnolia Editions, Oakland, Calif.; Electric Works, San Francisco, Calif.; ULAE, New York, N.Y.; and Smith Andersen Editions, Palo Alto, Calif.

The Walter Gropius Master Artists Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

Tri-State Arts Association

September 8 - October 21, 2012

Opening reception takes place from 2 to 4 p.m. September 9, 2012.

The Tri-State Arts Association will present this biennial exhibition that promotes the work of artists living and working in West Virginia, Kentucky and Ohio. Jurors for this year’s exhibition are Judi Parks, Cincinnati, Ohio, and Robert Wren Smith, Vienna, West Virginia. A variety of media will be represented, including painting, drawing, photography, ceramics, sculpture, glass, wood, textiles, and mixed-media.

The Tri-State Arts Association has been in existence since 1953. The association was formed “to encourage and promote a public interest in and understanding of all schools of art, and to create and develop a closer relationship between art and the community.” The Huntington Museum of Art has been showcasing work by members of the Tri-State Arts Association since 1959.

Tri-State Arts Association

Opening reception takes place on June 16, 2012, with a 6 p.m. Public Presentation by Walter Gropius Master Artist Judy Pfaff followed by a reception. Admission to the opening reception is free.

Since 1992, the Huntington Museum has been the home to a brilliant and generous program which has enabled staff to select and bring a wide range of practicing artists known both nationally and internationally to Huntington. While here, each artist presents a hands-on or demonstration workshop available especially to artists of the Tri-State region. The workshops are accompanied by an eight-week exhibition of the artist’s work and a public lecture. In the past 20 years, 99 artists have visited the Museum, providing artists of this region the opportunity for observation, experimentation, constructive criticism, and comradeship with other artists.

The Walter Gropius Master Artist Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, a Huntington native, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition, as well at the Gropius Studios constructed in 1970. Alex E. Booth, Jr., Roxanna’s son, has advised and participated in the concept development of this series.

Roughly 10 years ago, a decision was made by the Museum to acquire a representative work by each of the visiting Gropius artists, when possible. This exhibition presents works that have been acquired to date and celebrates 20 years of the Walter Gropius Master Artist Series. Works on view represent a variety of media and show the breadth of the workshops offered. In the past two decades, workshops have focused on ceramics, photography, painting, pastel, printmaking, hand-made paper, glass, textiles, fiber, mixed-media and large-scale indoor and outdoor installations. The Museum continues to bring approximately six artists to Huntington each year and will continue to acquire representative works by these inspirational visiting artists.

This exhibit is sponsored by The Herald-Dispatch, the Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment, West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

The Collection of Alex E. Booth, Jr.

June 2 - October 7, 2012

Opening reception takes place on June 16, 2012, with a 6 p.m. Public Presentation by Walter Gropius Master Artist Judy Pfaff followed by a reception. Admission to the opening reception is free.

The Collection of Alex E. Booth, Jr. is striking in its breadth and variety, and comprises some of the most significant works in the Huntington Museum of Art’s permanent collection. Since 1964, and throughout his many years of involvement with the Huntington Museum of Art, Alex E. Booth, Jr. has made many generous gifts to this Museum, expanding its holdings in many areas.

Mr. Booth’s art interests are wide ranging, from important American paintings by Samuel Finley Breese Morse, John Singer Sargent, and Edward Potthast; American abstract sculpture from the 1950s and 1960s, including a Harry Bertoia sound sculpture titledWheat Field; a still life pastel by Georges Braque; a beautiful and important sketch by George Bellows titledCounted Out; important abstract expressionist works by Franz Kline and Robert Motherwell, as well as works that reflect his world travels.

Alex E. Booth, Jr. headed the Museum’s board from 1971 to 1973 and chaired the Buildings Committee at the time of the 1970 Gropius addition. It was this Committee that selected the Architect’s Collaborative, headed by Walter Gropius, to design the Museum’s additional galleries and studios. It is fitting that this collection is displayed concurrently and alongside works by artists who have visited the Museum as part of the Walter Gropius Master Artist Series, as that program has been partly conceived by Mr. Booth, and is funded through the generosity of the Estate of his Mother, Roxanna Y. Booth.

In addition to the objects on display in the Daywood Gallery, visitors can find numerous sculptures from the Booth Collection on permanent display in the Museum’s Virginia Cavendish Sculpture Courtyard and throughout the Museum grounds.

This exhibit is sponsored by The Herald-Dispatch, the Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment, West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Judy Pfaff will give her Walter Gropius Master Artist Public Presentation at 6 p.m. Saturday, June 16, 2012, during the opening reception for her exhibit, and Visiting Inspiration: Twenty Years of Gropius Artists and The Collection of Alex E. Booth, Jr. Admission to the opening reception is free.

Internationally recognized for her complex, large-scale installations, Judy Pfaff pioneered installation art in the 1970s and remains one of the movement’s most influential artists, renowned for her ability to manipulate space. Balancing the intense planning of an engineer with the improvisational decision-making of an artist, Pfaff synthesizes sculpture, painting and architecture into dynamic new, site-specific environments.

Although carefully organized in advance, these sprawling installations develop on-site through a working process that is highly intuitive and physical; the final composition grows organically within the space as she accumulates, subtracts and refines the elements. Over the course of her prolific career, Pfaff has worked with a wide and unusual range of everyday, organic and industrial materials, and incorporates many different media in her work. While known primarily as a sculptor, her paintings and prints are equally powerful and have a flowing, three-dimensional presence. According to Pfaff, her work thrives on the complexity of life and the fluidity of the creative process.

Judy Pfaff was born in London in 1946 and settled in America at the age of 13. She received her B.F.A. from Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, and her M.F.A. from Yale University, New Haven, Conn. Her innovative work has garnered wide acclaim from galleries and museums throughout the United States, Europe, and the Far East, and is found in such prestigious collections as the Detroit Institute of Art, Detroit, Mich.; The Museum of Modern Art, New York, N.Y.; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, N.Y.; and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, Penn.

Pfaff has received many awards, including a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Award (2004); a Bessie Award (1984); and fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation (1983) and the National Endowment for the Arts (1986). She has had more than 100 major solo installations at such venues as Elvehjem Museum of Art, University of Wisconsin, Madison (2002); Denver Art Museum, Denver, Colo. (1994); St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, Missouri, (1989); and Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, N.Y. (1982). She represented the United States in the 1998 Bienal de São Paulo. Pfaff is the Richard B. Fisher Professor in the Arts and Co-Chair of the Studio Arts Program at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, N.Y., and currently lives and works in Kingston and Tivoli, N.Y.

The Walter Gropius Master Artists Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

This selection of 40 prints and paintings, dating from 1900-2000, was selected from the collection of the Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art at Auburn University, and will be traveling to Huntington as part of HMA’s continued collection sharing venture with regional and southern museums.

The art of modern Mexico has its beginnings in the satiric black and white prints of José Guadalupe Posada (1852-1913), and two of his energetic prints accompany this show. His highly circulated graphic work brought a popular, anti-establishment message to the masses, and influenced successive generations of activist artists, especially during and following the first socialist revolution (1910-1920).

Among those influenced were “Los Tres Grandes” muralists, José Clemente Orozco, Diego Rivera, and David Alfaro Siqueiros, who in the 1930s began a lithographic revival, prompting a number of artists to begin examining, through printmaking, their pre-Hispanic roots as Mexicans, as well as issues of social justice and politics. All three are represented with powerful lithographs. One of the most active print collectives was the Taller de Grafica Popular (People’s Graphic Workshop), founded in 1937 in Mexico City and in existence through 1953. Seven prints from the suite titledMexican People by member artists will be on view, as well as other works by members of the group.

Rufino Tamayo, Francisco Zuniga, and Francisco Corzas Chávez, who turned away from social commentary and concentrated on their individual styles are each represented by strong works. Prints and paintings by Alejandro Colunga, Francisco Toledo, Ismael Vargas and Jorge López Garcia, all younger Mexican artists, bring the viewer up to the 21st century. Also on view will be a selection of prints by a number of international artists who were drawn to the Mexican art scene, including Edith Bry, Leonora Carrington, and Jean Charlot.

This exhibit is sponsored by Macy’s, the Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment, West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Fine Arf!

May 26 - July 22, 2012

To help celebrate Huntington’s win over 15 other cities vying for the $100,000 Pet Safe “Bark for Your Park Contest” and to help observe the opening of the park this summer, the Huntington Museum of Art will present an exhibition featuring images of dogs from HMA’s permanent collection.

The works on exhibit span five centuries, from the 16th through the 20th centuries, and portray the relationships between humans and their canine companions. Visitors will be able to view many different types of dogs rendered in a variety of media including oil paintings, watercolors, sculptures, prints, and decorative art objects. Each image will be accompanied by a famous quote about dogs.

Artists with works featured in the exhibit include Alex Katz, Adele Lewis, Susannah F.Q. Nicholson, Levon West, Sir Frances Seymour Haden, Marguerite Kirmse, Casper Netscher, George Ford Morris, Marilyn Bendell, Marcel Vertes, Richard Lindner, T.A. Hay, Charley Kinney, Fairfield Porter, and Giovanni de’Bussi Cariani.

Once the exhibit opens to the public, visitors to the Huntington Museum of Art’s Facebook page will be able to upload a photo of their favorite dog to the site.

This exhibit is sponsored by the Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment, West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Opening Reception begins at 7 p.m. May 22, 2012. Admission is free.

The 10 West Virginia Finalists in the Doodle 4 Google ™ competition will be on display at the Huntington Museum of Art during this exciting exhibit. Admission to HMA will be free throughout the run of this exhibit.

Doodle 4 Google ™ WV Finalists Exhibition

Opening reception begins at 2 p.m. Sunday, April 22, 2012, with Warren MacKenzie giving his Walter Gropius Master Artist Public Presentation followed by a reception. Admission to this opening reception is free.

Walter Gropius Master Artist Randy Johnston will present a demonstration-only workshop at HMA during this exhibit on April 20-22. Call (304) 529-2701 for workshop fee information.

Ceramic artist and teacher Kathleen Kneafsey has served as artist-in-residence at the Huntington Museum of Art for the past 10 years. She is responsible for selecting the country’s top ceramic artists to visit Huntington, WV, as part of the Walter Gropius Master Artist Workshop Series. Thanks to her ongoing efforts the museum’s small clay studio has grown, the workshop program has gained national stature, and HMA’s contemporary ceramics collection expands with each visiting artist. Kneafsey’s bold vision and commitment to ceramics education continues with Sources and Influences: Contemporary Clay Artists, Mentors and Students.

Sources and Influences explores the connections, tangible and intangible, between mentors and students within the current studio ceramics community in the U.S., beginning with a single, representative work by each of the 22 clay artists who have participated in the Walter Gropius Master Artist Workshop Series. In keeping with the theme, each of the artists has selected two additional ceramists to display work alongside their own: an artist they consider their mentor, and another whom they have mentored. The exhibit will present a total of 66 works, both functional and sculptural. Three generations of potters are represented, from early vanguards of the studio pottery movement to those just beginning their career in clay. Professional give-and-take remains, as it always has, an important vehicle to transmit ideas concerning technique and aesthetic; however, among these ceramic artists, camaraderie often extends beyond direct instruction in the studio. Sources and Influences is rooted in the power of these relationships to shape not only a career, but a life – in clay.

This exhibit is sponsored by The Herald-Dispatch, the Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment, In Memory of Dr. Paul Ambrose, In Honor of Milton and Jane Herndon, In Memory of Mary Etta Hight, In Memory of James B. Hoey, In Honor of Helen and Bob Massullo, In Memory of See-More (English Bull Terrier 4/25/2005-11/9/2010), the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Classes & Workshops Exhibition

May 15 - May 20, 2012

Opening reception takes place on May 15, 2012, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

During evening hours and on weekends, eager artists fill the HMA studios, honing their art-making skills and enjoying the camaraderie of fellow artists. Some of the classes that take place throughout the year are pottery, watercolor, figure drawing, photography, pastels and the use of Photoshop. Be sure to enjoy this exhibit of work by HMA’s studio artists.

Classes & Workshops Exhibition

Portfolio 2012

April 14 - May 13, 2012

Opening Reception and Awards Ceremony begin at 2 p.m. April 14, 2012

Portfolio 2012 is a must see! This exhibit celebrates the work of middle school and high school art students (and their teachers) in the surrounding counties of Cabell, Wayne, Putnam, Lincoln, Mingo and Jackson in West Virginia, Lawrence in Ohio, and Boyd, Greenup and Carter in Kentucky. An awards ceremony takes place the opening day of the exhibit with a reception following.

Portfolio is generously funded by the Marshall University College of Fine Arts.

Portfolio 2012

Amy Cutler is internationally recognized for her meticulously detailed narrative works of art – open-ended allegories that are at once whimsical, ominous and perplexing. Cutler’s gouache paintings, drawings and prints vividly depict a world populated by women, animals and hybrid-beings engaged in fantastic, dream-like activities.

Cutler was born in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., in 1974. She studied at the Staatliche Hochschule fur Bildende Kunste, Stadelschule, Frankfurt am Main, Germany, from 1994-1995; received her BFA from The Cooper Union School of Art, New York, N.Y., in 1997; and continued her studies at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 1999. Having rapidly gained an international audience, Cutler’s work has been included in major exhibitions of contemporary art, including The Whitney Biennial in 2004 and Greater New York at PSI/MOMA in 2005. She has had solo exhibitions at the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City, Mo.; the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minn.; and the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia, Penn. Her paintings, drawings, and prints are included in the collections of the Hammer Museum at UCLA; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art, and New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York City, N.Y.; the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minn.; the Indianapolis Museum of Art, Indianapolis, Ind., and numerous private collections. Cutler is represented by Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects, New York, N.Y.

The Walter Gropius Master Artists Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

A Bosnian of Muslim heritage, Tanja Softić grew up in Sarajevo where she received her undergraduate diploma in painting from the Academy of Fine Arts of the University of Sarajevo in 1988. While completing graduate studies in printmaking at Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Va., (M.F.A. 1992), the Bosnian War erupted in her homeland half a world away, permanently altering the course of her life. Displaced and unable to return, Softić forged ahead, an émigré artist in a new environment and culture: the United States.

Softić’s works on paper explore the nature of memory, cultural identity, and national belonging experienced through the hybrid worldview of an immigrant. With a rich visual vocabulary that draws upon artistic, literary and scientific methods of inquiry, Softić creates intricately layered images full of iconography and association. Exquisitely rendered elements of landscape, microscopic life forms, architectural details and diagrams, obsolete geographical maps, astronomical charts, and anatomical fragments are combined to suggest a narrative that is deeply personal, yet easily adaptable to interpretation.

Softić is a recipient of the Pollock-Krasner Grant, National Endowment for the Arts/ Southern Arts Federation Visual Artist Fellowship and Soros Foundation – Open Society Institute Exhibition Support Grant. Her work is included in numerous collections in the U.S. and abroad, among them New York Public Library, Library of Congress Print Department and New South Wales Gallery of Art in Sydney, Australia. She participated in the 12th International Print Triennial in Krakow, Poland, and won a First Prize at the 5th Kochi International Triennial Exhibition of Prints, Ino-cho Paper Museum, Kochi, Japan, in 2002. She completed print projects at Flying Horse Press, Tamarind Institute and Anderson Ranch’s Patton Printshop. She is currently Professor of Art and Chair of the Department of Art and Art History at the University of Richmond, Richmond, Va.

The Walter Gropius Master Artists Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, Alex Booth, for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

Warren MacKenzie Background

“Out of a kiln-load of hundreds of pots, only a few reach out strongly to the user. Out of this small number, even fewer will continue to engage the senses after daily use. These seem to tap a source beyond the personal and deal with universal experience.” – Warren MacKenzie

Internationally recognized as a true master of 20th Century ceramics, Warren MacKenzie has influenced and inspired ceramicists, young and old, for more than 50 years. His career embodies the changing role of the ceramic artist in society, from the emergence of the individual studio potter in the 1950s to the vibrant contemporary studio pottery movement. In his Stillwater, Minnesota, studio, MacKenzie works daily to create functional, wheel thrown glazed stoneware vessels – largely unadorned – that emphasize form, surface and the physical gestures of making. Within these works, the artist’s hand is evident, intangibly linking maker to user through a respectful balance of form and function. Mackenzie’s pursuit of the “honest”, functionally elegant pot is legendary, and is rooted in the traditions of his mentors: British potter, Bernard Leach; Japanese potter, Shoji Hamada; and Japanese aesthetician, Soetsu Yanagi, all leading proponents of the Japanese mingei(“art of the people”) philosophy. Mingei celebrates simplicity, subtlety and the humble beauty that arises from an object’s utility, but the precepts transcend aesthetics to become a way of life. As an educator, MacKenzie has imparted this unique fusion of art and life to countless students including Randy Johnston, Jeff Oestreich, Mark Pharis and Sandy Simon, to name only a few. From 1953-1990, MacKenzie taught ceramics at the University of Minnesota, chaired the Department of Studio Art from 1981-1985, and placed the university ceramics department – and the whole “Mingei-sota” region – on the map as a major American hub of ceramic activity.

MacKenzie was born in 1924 in Kansas City, Missouri, and graduated from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1947. From 1949-1952, MacKenzie and his first wife, Alix Kolesky, apprenticed with Bernard Leach (1887-1979) at his renowned pottery in St. Ives, Cornwall, England, and learned firsthand how to run a pottery studio. Through Leach, the young artists befriended Shoji Hamada (1894–1978), by then a master mingei potter, and Soetsu Yanagi (1889-1961). Upon their return, they established a pottery studio in Stillwater, Minnesota, and in 1953 MacKenzie began teaching ceramics at the University of Minnesota. Throughout his impressive career, MacKenzie has exhibited both nationally and internationally and conducted countless lectures and workshops throughout the country. Amongst numerous awards, MacKenzie was named a Regent’s Professor and a fellow of the International Academy of Ceramics in 1984 and was the first to receive the Minnesota Governor’s Award in Crafts in 1986. MacKenzie retired from teaching in 1990, but continues to make pots in his studio, exhibit and sell his work and lecture in America and abroad. In 1997 he received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Minnesota Crafts Council and a year later was honored with the Gold Medal from the American Crafts Council. His work is represented in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York; the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.; the National Folk Art Museum in Tokyo, Japan; the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, England; the Contemporary American Crafts Museum in New York, NY; the Bernard Leach Study Collection in Bath, England; the Minnesota Museum of American Art in St. Paul, MN; the Weisman Art Museum and the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, both in Minneapolis, MN.

Randy Johnston Background

Randy Johnston has worked in ceramics in his Wisconsin studio for more than 40 years. Although firmly grounded in the functional vessel tradition, he is recognized internationally as a ceramic artist who has brought a fresh aesthetic to contemporary form. While building upon the Japanese mingei (“art of the people”) philosophies of his mentors, Johnston also experiments with new ideas and materials. His hallmark technique includes natural ash glaze firing with an emphasis on flashing, scorching, and vitrified ash deposits. The violent nature of this firing adds a level of unpredictability to the process, often imbuing the finished work with a raw, primal surface. He produces a wide variety of glazed wares as well, using his own versions of standard Japanese glazes. Johnston has made exploration an equally important part of his creative career. Fresh out of college in 1972, he built one of the earliest noborigama (climbing kilns) in the United States, and has achieved recognition for his many contributions to the development of wood kiln technology in this country.

Johnston is currently a professor and department chair at the University of Wisconsin, River Falls, where he teaches ceramics and drawing. Johnston is the recipient of numerous awards including the Bush Artist Fellowship granted by the Bush Foundation in Minnesota and two Visual Artist Fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts. Johnston received his M.F.A. from Southern Illinois University and a B.F.A. in Studio Arts from the University of Minnesota, where he studied with Warren MacKenzie. He also studied in Japan at the pottery of Shimaoka Tatsuzo, who was a student of Shoji Hamada, internationally recognized for bringing Japanese ceramic techniques and philosophies to the West. Johnston has presented hundreds of lectures and guest artist presentations worldwide. His work is exhibited internationally and is represented in permanent collections such as the Victoria & Albert Museum, London; Minneapolis Art Institute, Minneapolis; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Los Angeles County Museum, Los Angeles; Nelson-Atkins Museum, Kansas City; and numerous international, public and private collections.

Walter Gropius Master Artist Exhibit: Warren MacKenzie & Randy Johnston

In the almost 60 years of the Museum’s existence, a wide range of beautiful textiles have been given to the Museum by generous donors forming a substantial “collection within a collection.”

Some of these works have become well known to our visitors over the years, including the Near Eastern Prayer rugs on view in the Touma Gallery, George Washington’s Cherry Tree quilt, and the large French Tapestry which depicts the goddess Diana returning from the hunt. However, these are just a few of the riches within the collection. Because of the fragile nature of textiles (they are highly susceptible to the fading effects of overexposure to light), many of these works rarely go on display.

From Rugs to Riches: Treasured Textiles from the Permanent Collection displays a wide variety of textiles from all over the world including French tapestries; Near Eastern Prayer Rugs; American quilts, coverlets and hooked rugs; Chinese and Japanese robes; Native American beaded items; Pre-Columbian Peruvian weavings and bags; paisley shawls and tie-dyed fabric from India; and French and American bags from the 1920s.

This exhibit is sponsored by The Herald-Dispatch, West Virginia Division of Culture and History; the West Virginia Commission on the Arts; and the Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibitions Endowment.

Lenny Lyons Bruno: Coal Camp Series 2000-2010

November 19 - February 19, 2012

Meet the artist at HMA’s Holiday Open House on December 4, 2011, from 1 to 4 p.m.

Lenny Lyons Bruno was born in a West Virginia coal camp in 1947. The Coal Camp Series is a visual narrative of those early years. A self-taught artist, Lenny shares her memories in large paintings that incorporate a wide range of materials including quilts, photographs, ledgers and found objects often dating back to that era. Her sculpture follows the same theme, everyday objects reconfigured into iconoclastic forms that create a sense of nostalgia and wonder. While layered and complex, her paintings and sculpture have enormous emotional impact for the viewer, one that encourages a personal journey of discovery.

This exhibit is sponsored by the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, West Virginia Commission on the Arts, and the Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

Fifty Years of Contemporary Prints 1960-2010

December 10 - February 19, 2012

Since 1960, each subsequent decade has brought technological advances and experimentation to the world of printmaking. Since the 1960s and 1970s, artists have had access to large printmaking centers and workshops employing master printers, large scale presses and papers, and the capability of combining non-traditional processes and materials. With that said, however, many artists still work alone, and execute and pull prints in their private studios.

Artists have broadened their range of media, with painters and sculptors delving into the world of printmaking. Thus, today, already into the second decade of the 21st century, the possibilities of printmaking seem endless.

This exhibition will explore prints from the past five decades and will present outstanding examples of work by well-known artists, including Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, Jim Dine, Helen Frankenthaler, Keith Haring, Chuck Close, Jennifer Bartlett, John Baldessari, Yvonne Jacquette, and Willie Cole, among others.

This exhibit is sponsored by the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, West Virginia Commission on the Arts, and the Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

Opening reception coincides with Holiday Open House from 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday, December 4, 2011, with demonstrations of spinning, weaving, knitting, and quilt piecing, in addition to music and dance performances, a visit from Santa Claus, refreshments, and much more.

In the almost sixty years of the Museum’s existence, a wide range of beautiful textiles have been given to the Museum by generous donors forming a substantial “collection within a collection.”

Some of these works have become well known to our visitors over the years, including the Near Eastern Prayer rugs on view in the Touma Gallery, George Washington’s Cherry Tree quilt, and the large French Tapestry which depicts the goddess Diana returning from the hunt. However, these are just a few of the riches within the collection. Because of the fragile nature of textiles (they are highly susceptible to the fading effects of overexposure to light), many of these works rarely go on display.

From Rugs to Riches: Treasured Textiles from the Permanent Collection will display a wide variety of textiles from all over the world including French tapestries; Near Eastern Prayer Rugs; American quilts, coverlets and hooked rugs; Chinese robes; a Japanese kimono; Native American beaded items; Pre-Columbian Peruvian weavings and bags; paisley shawls and tie-dyed fabric from India and the Near East; and French and American beaded bags from the 1920s.

The Museum was fortunate to have Jennifer Pisula as an intern during the summer. Jennifer is a graduate student at Rhode Island University studying Historic Textiles and Costume and was able to work with curatorial staff on the selection, display and conservation of many of the Museum’s textiles. We thank Jennifer for all of her assistance.

This exhibit is sponsored by The Herald-Dispatch, West Virginia Division of Culture and History; the West Virginia Commission on the Arts; and the Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibitions Endowment.

Winslow Anderson first visited Haiti in 1951, and would return to the Island at least once a year for the next 40 years. Anderson was a ceramist and a painter, and from 1947-1953 he was the first designer at Blenko Glass Company, Milton, West Virginia, hired to design modern utilitarian vessels for factory production. Anderson had been trained as a potter at New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred (now Alfred University) and studied form, composition and color with the renowned abstract expressionist Hans Hofmann, whose principles were largely non-objective and cerebral. Anderson felt that Hofmann’s teachings “appeal to a painter in the same way a Bach fugue appeals to a musician.”

We know from comments he wrote about his collection that when he first viewed Haitian paintings he “saw for the first time, fun and joy in paintings just as the musician would have fun in playing The Blue Danubeor the Beer Barrel Polka as compared to a complicated fugue … During these years, I purchased many (Haitian) paintings – all chosen with my heart and not my head. Each one inspired me to ‘get to the easel’ and start to paint.”

In thinking of these formative years in Anderson’s career (he was 30 years old when he began working for Blenko) one can’t help wonder if the Haitian paintings not only inspired his own easel paintings, but also influenced his color choices at Blenko. This exhibit will explore that idea of the bright, bold colors of Haiti finding credence with glass designed and produced in West Virginia.

This exhibit is presented by Macy’s, with additional generous support from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, the West Virginia Commission on the Arts, and the Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.