Past

The Huntington Museum of Art will present the exhibit titled InSights: Visionary Art by Artists who are Blind from Dec. 7, 2021, to Jan. 9, 2022. The public is invited to attend the “2021 American Printing House for the Blind Huntington Speaker Series Session: Inclusive Arts” event on Dec. 7, 2021, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Huntington Museum of Art. Admission to this Dec. 7 event is free.

The “2021 APH Huntington Speaker Series Session: Inclusive Arts” will begin with a reception and viewing of the exhibition in HMA’s Virginia Van Zandt Great Hall from 6 to 6:30 p.m., followed by a guided tour of selections from the APH InSights Art collection, an annual juried exhibition featuring artists who are blind or visually impaired from around the world, from 6:30 to 7 p.m. The event concludes with a panel discussion from 7 to 7:30 p.m.

Robert Guillen, Special Programs Coordinator at APH and curator of the Insights Art exhibition, will lead the 6:30 p.m. guided tour of two-and three-dimensional selections, including painting, sculpture, and craft, from the Insights Art exhibition and share information about the history of Insights Art, its featured artists, and the impact of this exhibition opportunity.

The 7 p.m. panel discussion on the impact of inclusive arts will take place in the HMA’s Grace Rardin Doherty Auditorium and will feature Guillen; Kathleen Kneafsey, HMA Visual Artist in Residence and teacher of the HMA clay studio class for people who are blind or visually impaired; and John Farley, HMA Senior Curator & Exhibition Designer. The “APH Huntington Speaker Series: Inclusive Arts” is free to attend and is presented in partnership with HMA.

Taking place throughout 2021-2022, the “APH Huntington Speaker Series” is pleased to present a diverse series of presentations and special guest speakers addressing the experiences, challenges, opportunities, and perspectives of people who are blind or visually impaired.

Founded in 1858 with a charter to provide accessible materials for all people in the United States who are blind, the American Printing House for the Blind (APH), based in Louisville, KY, has provided innovative products and essential services to people with vision loss for more than 160 years. The mission of APH is to empower people who are blind or visually impaired by providing accessible and innovative products, materials, and services for lifelong success. Today, APH is the world’s largest nonprofit organization creating accessible products and programs designed to support the educational, workplace, and independent living needs of people who are blind or visually impaired. Established in 2020, APH Huntington, a program of APH, provides access technology trainings and community learning opportunities addressing the needs of people with vision loss in Huntington.

Since 1992, the American Printing House for the Blind (APH) has hosted an art contest for artists who happen to be blind. Both amateur and professional artists from around the world enter their artwork in a juried art competition. Original works of two-dimensional art, sculpture, or craft are considered each year by a panel of artists, art educators, and others in the field of art. Winners receive prizes, experience their artwork displayed in an annual exhibit, and have a chance to travel to Louisville, Kentucky — the hometown of APH — to receive their award at the annual InSights Art awards celebration.

The APH Huntington 2021-2022 Speaker Series is supported in part by the Pallottine Foundation of Huntington and The James H. and Alice Teubert Charitable Trust. Learn more about APH Huntington by contacting Lee Huffman at [email protected] or 304-634-1120. Learn about APH at www.aph.org.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Manpower Presents Art on a Limb

November 30 - January 2, 2022

Manpower Presents Art on a Limb, an exhibit of holiday trees decorated with ornaments created by regional artists, from Nov. 30, 2021, through Jan. 2, 2022, at the Huntington Museum of Art.

Although the Manpower Presents Art on a Limb exhibit will take place, Holiday Open House at HMA has been canceled this year because of COVID-19 concerns.

The Manpower Presents Art on a Limb exhibit features the work of artists in The Huntington Calligraphers’ Guild, Tri-Area Needle Arts, West Virginia Bead Society and the Western Weavers Guild of the West Virginia Basketmakers Association. The Palette Tree in HMA’s Virginia Van Zandt Great Hall features individual artist palettes featuring the artwork of dozens of regional artists, including Paula Clendenin, the late Charles Jupiter Hamilton, Lee Ann Blevins, and the late Chuck Ripper, among others.

“We are so grateful to all the artists groups and individual artists who have contributed to making this exhibit so special,” said Cindy Dearborn, HMA Education Director. “We also want to thank the volunteers who help the staff of the Huntington Museum of Art get this exhibit ready for the public to enjoy.”

You can view the Manpower Presents Art on a Limb Book here.

This exhibit is presented by Manpower.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Latin American Roots

October 16 - January 9, 2022

Generally understood as the North, Central and South American and Caribbean nations where languages derived from Latin – such as Spanish, Portuguese and French – are predominantly spoken, the concept of Latin America reflects the region’s shared colonial heritage.

Spanning two continents, the amalgam of geographic regions described as Latin America were wellsprings of sophisticated indigenous culture long before seafaring European explorers crossed the Atlantic Ocean. Pre-Columbian civilizations such as the Maya, Aztec, Inca, and others developed vibrant artistic practices over millennia. In the late 15th and early 16th centuries, Europeans arrived seeking new land and trading opportunities. For the next three centuries, Spanish, Portuguese and French interests colonized large parts of the Western Hemisphere and imposed European artistic conventions onto existing visual traditions. Millions of native inhabitants in Latin America were conquered or killed during this territorial expansion, succumbed to newly introduced diseases, or were brutally subjugated in the pursuit of natural resources. As this human toll inevitably dwindled the indigenous workforce, colonial powers satisfied the demand for free labor by forcibly importing millions of enslaved Africans to participate in military expeditions and work in the fields and mines. The men and women of this diaspora introduced their own unique visual language and contributed African cultural elements to the New World melting pot.

A revolutionary fire swept the region during the late 18th and early 19th centuries – stoked in part by the American and French revolutions – and the people of Latin America began fighting for independence from colonial rule. The Haitian Revolution, led by enslaved people and free people of color, saw France’s wealthiest colony, “The Pearl of the Antilles,” force the abolition of slavery and become the world’s first Black-led republic in 1804. This reverberated throughout the Americas. While many Latin American nations were decolonized within those first tumultuous decades of the 19th century, others did not gain independence until the 20th century, and some remain non-sovereign territories.

Although much of post-colonial Latin America has often been defined by inequality, internal strife and external intervention, a hopeful human spirit persists.

From the museum’s permanent collection, Latin American Roots will feature modern and contemporary artworks by a variety of artists whose Latin American heritage has allowed them a unique vantage point from which to interpret this history. From abstraction to political activism, the works express a range of aesthetic and personal concerns. This exhibit will examine overarching themes and highlight individual stories, reminding us that both measures are important in order to form a more complete understanding of those who hail from this complex, diverse region.

This exhibit is presented with support from The Katherine & Herman Pugh Exhibitions Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

The Huntington Museum of Art will welcome Jessica Drenk as a Walter Gropius Master Artist in July and will present an exhibit of her work from May 8 through Aug. 1, 2021.

Drenk will discuss her work in a free public presentation at HMA on July 22, 2021, at 7 p.m. Drenk will present a workshop titled “The Altered Book: Repurposing Old Books as a Catalyst for Creativity” from July 23-25. Call (304) 529-2701 for fee information. To allow for social distancing, the number of workshop participants is limited.

Raised in Montana, Drenk developed an appreciation for the natural world that inspires her artwork. Drenk’s sculptures, which are tactile and textural, highlight the chaos and beauty found in simple materials.

Drenk earned an MFA in 3D Art from the University of Arizona and a bachelor’s degree from Pomona College. Drenk’s work can be found internationally in private collections, as well as corporate and university collections in America. Drenk’s awards include an Artist Project Grant from the Arizona Commission on the Arts, and the International Sculpture Center’s Outstanding Student Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award. Her work has been pictured in Sculpture, Interior Design, and Curve magazines, as well as The Workshop Guide to Ceramics. Recently, her work has become part of the Fidelity art collection and the Yale University Art Gallery. A working artist since 2007, her home and studio are near Rochester, New York.

The Walter Gropius Master Artist Program is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition, as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum is indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, the late Alex Booth, Jr., for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.


The Huntington Museum of Art will participate in the City of Huntington’s yearlong celebration of its 150th birthday with a special exhibit and publication of a new art reference book that both feature the work of Huntington artists.

The Huntington Sesquicentennial Exhibit will be on view at the Huntington Museum of Art from September 18, 2021, through January 16, 2022.

Beginning with a bronze portrait of city founder Collis P. Huntington by famed sculptor Anna Hyatt Huntington, the exhibit will include early landscape paintings that depict the genesis of the built environment in Huntington and move forward to more contemporary representations by artists such as former Marshall University professor Stan Sporny. A selection of decorative objects that were made in Huntington will also be included, such as pottery from the Wyllie China Company and glass from manufacturers such as Huntington Tumbler Company and Rainbow Glass Company. 

The primary focus includes artists who have lived and worked in the city, ranging from familiar names such as Chuck Ripper and Adele Thornton Lewis, to former Huntington barber Billy Scott, whose paintings depict the lives of the city’s African-American residents in bygone days. Covering the entire timespan of the city’s existence, the show will also highlight work in a variety of media from the late 19th century to contemporary artworks by June Kilgore, Theresa Polley-Shellcroft, Vernon Howell, Klaus Ihlenfeld, Tina Williams Brewer, and Don Pendleton.

HMA is pleased to announce that a new biographical dictionary on artists who have lived in Huntington will be released during the city’s anniversary year. Titled “Eclectic Rhythms: The Artists of Huntington, West Virginia 1871-Present,” the book is dedicated to noted art historian Chris Petteys (1927-2006), who authored the groundbreaking work titled “Dictionary of Women Artists: An International Dictionary of Women Artists Born Before 1900.”

The new book contains nearly 600 biographies of artists of every type who made their home in the city at some point during their careers. “Editing a book about the artists of Huntington, West Virginia, was both a daunting and rewarding task,” said HMA Executive Director Geoffrey K. Fleming. “Huntington has been blessed with a number of talented artists and I believe this book highlights the talents of each one of them while providing a valuable research tool for anyone interested in the city’s artistic past.” 

This exhibit is presented by City of Huntington and the 150th Anniversary Committee.

This exhibit is sponsored in part by Truist WV Foundation.

This exhibit has been made possible in part by a grant from the West Virginia Humanities Council. This project is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Humanities Council, a state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations do not necessarily represent those of the West Virginia Humanities Council or the National Endowment for the Humanities.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Huntington 150





While most prominent art collections grow from an abundance of personal wealth, Dorothy and Herbert Vogel proved that even ordinary citizens can make their mark on the art world and build a noteworthy collection. Early in their life together, the couple decided to use Dorothy’s pay as a librarian at the Brooklyn Public Library for their living expenses and Herbert’s salary from his work at the United States Postal Service to purchase art. With an initial focus upon drawings, the couple slowly amassed a stunning group of artworks.

Beginning in the 1960s, they spent their free time attending gallery openings and getting to know young artists whose work was of interest. They would typically buy directly from the artists themselves and would form lasting friendships with them – relationships that continued even as many of the artists rose to fame. As time went by, they accumulated more than 4,000 objects with a focus upon minimalist and conceptual art, including work by luminaries such as Sol Lewitt, Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Richard Tuttle, Chuck Close, Lynda Benglis, and Robert and Sylvia Mangold.

As the collection grew, it began to strain the bounds of their one-bedroom Manhattan apartment. The solution to their lack of storage space came when they agreed to donate their entire collection to the National Gallery of Art. The transfer of the work took five full-size trucks to move the work to Washington, D.C. Even the National Gallery found the size of the collection to be overwhelming, so eventually a plan was hatched by one of its curators, Ruth Fine, (with approval from the Vogels) to gift fifty of the works to one museum in each of the fifty states as part of a program known as Fifty Works for Fifty States. In West Virginia, the Huntington Museum of Art was chosen to receive one of the distributions of what Fine called a “mini-Vogel collection.” Included in the HMA selection are drawings by Richard Tuttle and Robert Mangold, sculpture by Lynda Benglis and Donald Sultan, and a selection of paintings by a diverse group of artists that present a snapshot of the Vogels’ remarkable collection.

This exhibit is presented by Community Trust Bank.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Blanche Lazzell (1878-1956) is arguably the most noteworthy artist that West Virginia has produced. She was an accomplished painter and teacher, and her works are highly sought after today by collectors and museums. An independent and free-spirited woman, she moved seamlessly between the hills of her native state of West Virginia, the Salons of Europe, and her adopted home and studio in Provincetown, Massachusetts.

Lazzell was among the first Americans to produce abstract prints, expressing the ideas of the Cubists and other European modernists in a series of color woodblock prints that was created in the mid-1920s. She joined with her colleagues in the Provincetown Printers Group to help pioneer the “one block” method of printing, a process that allowed the artist a great deal of freedom in the use of color, tone and texture. The subjects of her work include images of her home state of West Virginia and the bustling seaside environment of Provincetown, as well as the brightly colored flowers that adorned her garden. Her body of work, with its bold forms and strong colors, demonstrates her successful commitment to the modernist aesthetic and serves as a fitting expression of the exuberance and vitality of her own life.

For this exhibition, the Huntington Museum of Art is excited to partner with members of the extended family of Blanche Lazzell to showcase works from their private collections, including several of her renowned woodblock prints as well as paintings. These works will be accompanied by objects from the HMA collection.

This exhibit is presented by Doug and Lynn McCorkle.

This exhibit is presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

The Huntington Museum of Art has enjoyed a rich history during its lifespan of nearly seven decades, thanks in large part to the wide support it has received from the local community. In addition to the generous gifts of land and art that were made by museum founder Herbert Fitzpatrick before its opening in 1952, there have been a multitude of supporters who have stepped up to provide financial assistance and make gifts of artwork to the museum. One of the most impactful gifts in terms of the museum’s collection has been the Sarah Wheeler Charitable Trust, which provides funds for art purchases in memory of Sarah Slack Wheeler and her husband, Steve Wheeler.

Sarah Wheeler was born in Huntington in 1917, the daughter of Elizabeth and Frank Slack. She led an adventurous life, especially after her marriage to Steve Wheeler, whose work as a mining engineer took the couple on travels around the world. They lived overseas for lengthy periods of time, with extended residential stays in Paris, Venice, Monaco and Beirut. Her travels gave her access to a wide range of cultural experiences, including visits to some of the world’s most important museums.

Both Steve and Sarah were practicing artists as well, so the arts were deeply ingrained in their lives. The couple lived out their retirement years in Huntington, where members of Sarah’s extended family still resided. Following Steve’s passing, Sarah made plans to establish a trust to support three institutions that she felt were vital to the well-being of Huntington: Marshall University, the Cabell County Public Library, and the Huntington Museum of Art. The museum’s funds are dedicated to the purchase of paintings that were created in the year 1940 and earlier.

Among the key works that have been purchased with the funds include paintings by Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, Thomas Doughty, Henry Ossawa Tanner, Guy Wiggins, Edith Wilkinson, Blanche Lazzell, Thomas Hart Benton, and John Frederick Peto. A selection of the works purchased with funds from the Wheeler bequest will be showcased in the Museum’s Switzer Gallery, a space that was named in honor of former Huntington Mayor Rufus Switzer, whose own trust has provided key funds for the operation of the Museum since its founding.

This exhibit is presented with support from The Katherine & Herman Pugh Exhibitions Endowment.

This exhibit is presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

The Bodice Project

April 24 - July 25, 2021

The Bodice Project is a traveling sculpture exhibition about breast cancer survivors and their emotional healing post breast cancer.

After breast cancer every person asks the question: “Who am I now?” Breast cancer has pushed and pulled on the physical and emotional aspects of each individual, and they are left with physical and emotional scars.

The goal of The Bodice Project is to aid in the emotional healing of those women and men facing the challenges of breast cancer and to open the eyes and hearts of others. Nearly everyone has been touched by breast cancer in some way. The Bodice Project sheds light on the unique and individual stories of their journeys through the healing power of art.

It is a project that brings together artists, breast cancer survivors, patients and the public in a unique and meaningful way. Artists from the Mid-Atlantic area have created torso sculptures of breast cancer survivors who have undergone mastectomies or reconstructive surgery. When presented to the public, these beautiful works evoke a range of emotion, from empathy to solace.

This exhibit is presented with support from The Katherine & Herman Pugh Exhibitions Endowment.

This exhibit is presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

Additional support provided by Women 2 Women of the Huntington Regional Chamber of Commerce.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Portfolio 2021

April 17 - May 16, 2021

Portfolio is designed to showcase the exemplary artwork of middle school and high school students in the Tri-State region of West Virginia, Ohio, and Kentucky. This year, after a hiatus in 2020 because of the COVID-19 pandemic and continued health concerns, the Portfolio 2021 exhibition has been reorganized to showcase the best senior high school student art. In limiting the exhibition it is our goal to meet CDC guidelines while still recognizing these young artists and their teachers, creating an opportunity to participate in a high-quality exhibition within a museum setting and providing a venue for graduating students to build a portfolio for advanced study. Portfolio 2021 will not be juried this year, rather each senior student will receive a small cash prize for their participation. One student will be selected for the Janet Bromley Excellence in the Arts Award to be chosen by the Museum’s Curator. We are optimistically hopeful to return to a full exhibition, reception and award ceremony for Portfolio 2022.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

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