Past

The Huntington Museum of Art will launch a two-year series of exhibits titled The Visual Elements, with each exhibit focusing on a different building block of art. The first exhibit in the series titled The Visual Elements – Line Presented by Edward Tucker Architects, Inc. will run from Aug. 13 through Nov. 6, 2022.

This series of six interrelated exhibits begins with one of the simplest and most versatile elements in any artist’s toolbox: line. A line is a literal or implied connection between points or, as poetically defined by artist Suzanne Caporael, “a point moving through space, trailing its history behind.”

Drawing inspiration from the vision of famed architect Walter Gropius, The Visual Elements will cultivate creativity and a greater understanding of artistic expression with a six-part series of exhibits that explores the foundational building blocks of artmaking. Using the museum’s permanent collection, each exhibit will emphasize, thematically, a certain shared aspect of the art on display. Yet artworks are, most often, orchestrated arrangements of multiple visual elements, composed together in the service of constructing an image. Each installment in this series will also illustrate ways in which the visual elements build upon one another.

Walter Gropius (German, 1883-1969) is widely regarded as a pioneer of modern architecture. The Bauhaus School, founded by Gropius in Weimar, Germany, in 1919, greatly influenced subsequent developments in art, architecture, graphic design, interior design, industrial design, and typography.

In partnership with his firm, the Architects Collaborative of Cambridge, Massachusetts, Walter Gropius designed the Huntington Museum of Art’s 1968 addition and studios. Ours is the only American art museum brought to completion using a Gropius design, a remarkable chapter in HMA’s story and a significant contribution to Huntington’s architectural landscape.

In 1968, at the groundbreaking of what would become HMA’s expanded facility, Gropius spoke:

“It will be of incalculable value for Huntington and its neighboring towns to have at their disposal a greatly broadened institute – after these buildings will be finished – to pursue both the improvement of historic knowledge of art as well as the artistic creativity of their own young generation for the cultural benefit of the whole community. I ask your permission to stress particularly the aspect of workshop development in the gallery which is perhaps less obvious in its scope and value to the average person than appreciation of art of the past, but ever so much more important for the future generations’ creative attitude.”

This exhibit is presented by Edward Tucker Architects, Inc.

This exhibit is presented with support from The Katherine & Herman Pugh Exhibitions Endowment.

This exhibit is presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.





​Opening reception is planned for June 5, 2022, from 2 to 4 p.m.

In conjunction with the Huntington Museum of Art, the Tri-State Arts Association presents its biennial juried exhibition, a recurring showcase of the best artwork representing artists from West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky. A variety of media will be displayed, including painting, drawing, photography, ceramics, sculpture, glass, wood, textiles, and mixed media.

The Tri-State Arts Association was founded in 1953 to encourage and promote the work of artists living and working in West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky. TSAA and HMA have enjoyed a natural partnership thanks to the organizations’ shared mission to champion the arts in our community.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Studio Selections

May 21 - June 12, 2022

The Huntington Museum of Art will display artwork created by participants in its studio classes and workshops during the Studio Selections exhibit from May 21 through June 12, 2022. A free opening reception for this exhibit will take place on Tuesday, May 24, at 7 p.m. as part of the 4th Tuesday Tour Series at HMA.

“We are excited to give participants in the art classes and workshops at the Huntington Museum of Art the chance to display their artwork in a museum setting,” said HMA Education Director Cindy Dearborn. “It is also nice for museum visitors to see the quality of the work taking place in our art studios here at the Huntington Museum of Art.”

Recent studio classes offered at HMA include ceramics, photography, painting, printmaking and drawing.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Studio Selections

Portfolio 2022

April 16 - May 15, 2022

The Huntington Museum of Art presents the work of high school senior art students in the Portfolio 2022 exhibit, which is on view from April 16 through May 15, 2022. A virtual awards program will take place on April 16, at 2 p.m. on HMA’s YouTube channel. Because of the pandemic, HMA has narrowed the focus of this year’s exhibit to highlight the work of high school seniors as it also did in 2021.

Twenty student artworks from 13 Tri-State high schools are featured in this year’s exhibit. Participating high schools include Cabell Midland, Huntington, Logan, Poca, Point Pleasant, Spring Valley, and Tug Valley in West Virginia; Ironton and Rock Hill in Ohio; and Greenup, Paul G. Blazer, Raceland-Worthington, and Russell in Kentucky.

HMA Senior Curator/Exhibition Designer John Farley selected Kendra Fischer as the winner of the 2022 Janet Bromley Excellence in the Arts Award for her textile collage work titled “Blue Jean Bull.” The award winner attends Spring Valley High School, where Sara Tess Hager is her art teacher. All student artists participating in the exhibit will receive small cash prizes and certificates for being chosen by their teachers to participate in the exhibit.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Illustrated storytelling is a primal form of human communication, believed integral to the development of language. In this sense, the visual and narrative styles beloved in contemporary culture as comic art are simply modern expressions of a collective impulse buried deep in our prehistoric past.

Nearer the present, comic art represents a natural evolution of the political cartoons and satirical caricatures which have been printed in European and American newspapers and periodicals since the early 1800s. Cleverly designed interplays of text and image allowed for effective communication with a wide audience, regardless of age or literacy, making this format ideal for delivering social critique, propaganda, and entertainment. Published compilations of cartoon reprints and newspaper comic strips foreshadowed what was to come and, in 1935, the first comic book featuring original cartoon artwork was released. However, the Golden Age of Comic Books truly began in 1938 with Action Comics, no. 1, when an extraterrestrial infant refugee with superhuman potential crash landed in the idyllic American Midwest. The boy’s adopted parents named him Clark Kent, but humanity came to know this archetypal superhero, champion of the oppressed, by his alter-ego: Superman. By the mid-20th century, in addition to a growing number of mainstream comic creators, diverse independent artists, writers, and publishers were producing self-expressive comic art that commented on culture and politics from new perspectives. Barriers continue to be transformed into frontiers for creativity as artists and writers who once had limited voices in the traditional comic industry now enjoy a wider audience and larger platforms to tell their stories.

Once primarily an American art form, comic books and the pantheon of characters spawned within their pages now connect legions of devoted fans around the world through a common language. Comic sales have risen consistently for decades, and consumer demand continues to reach astonishing heights, a trend supercharged by the popularity of graphic novels and digital downloads. Free Comic Book Day – an annual promotional effort supported by participating comic book vendors – has spread to nearly sixty different countries. An undeniable pop-culture juggernaut, scores of commercially successful comic-inspired movies dominate at the box office, and critically acclaimed TV series stream directly into our living rooms. The original artwork for newspaper comic strips and comic books is coveted by collectors and exhibited by major museums.

No longer a niche hobby, comic culture is decidedly mainstream.

“POW!”: Comic Drawings from the Permanent Collection features original comic book art, comic strips, and sequential drawings created by some of America’s most noted comic artists, such as Bob Kane, Ernie Chan and Neil Adams, from the Huntington Museum of Art’s Michael Reynolds Collection of American Popular Culture.

This exhibit is sponsored in part by Truist WV Foundation.

This exhibit is presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

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WV Department of Arts, Culture and History
National Endowment for the Arts


Honoré Daumier (1808-1879) was a French artist renowned as a brilliant caricaturist with boundless imagination. For most of the artist’s life, he earned a living producing sharp-witted cartoons and provocative caricatures that satirized his countrymen.

Published in newspapers, periodicals, journals, and illustrated pamphlets, these striking images, often pointed and uncompromising, offer commentary on 19th century France – a time of social, cultural, and political upheaval. From the July Revolution of 1830 and the ascendance of the upper middle class, or bourgeoisie, to the fall of the Second Napoleonic Empire in 1870, Daumier’s images engaged the French populace through the weekly press.

He was politically aligned with the working class, in antagonistic opposition to the French constitutional monarchy and those who profited from it. His convictions occasionally lead to retribution and censorship. Early in Daumier’s career he was charged, fined, and briefly imprisoned for a scathing caricature that depicted an indolent French King Louis Phillippe gobbling bags of coins extracted from the nation’s workers – many of whom lived in miserable poverty.

Honoré Daumier mastered the recently invented lithographic printmaking process, a faster and less expensive method of mass-producing prints compared to the traditional practices of engraving and etching. He was prolific and drew 3,958 lithographs before the onset of blindness halted his work. Despite his reputation for acerbic political statements, many of these prints were lighthearted satires of contemporary life in industrialized French society.

Through the Eyes of Honoré Daumier will present selections from the Huntington Museum of Art’s impressive collection of lithographs by this influential artist, most of them gifts of the Armand Hammer Foundation. Although these works reflect the culture of a particular country and era through the eyes of one keen citizen, Daumier’s astute observations about humanity echo into the present.

This exhibit is presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Ceramic artist and teacher Kathleen Kneafsey has served as Artist-in-Residence at the Huntington Museum of Art for the past 22 years. In addition to teaching various clay classes and maintaining the ceramics studio, she is responsible for inviting world-class clay artists to Huntington, West Virginia, through the Museum’s renowned Walter Gropius Master Artist Program.

This engagement includes an exhibit of the artist’s work, a public lecture, and an intensive multi-day workshop conducted in the Museum’s art studios designed by famed architect and Bauhaus founder Walter Gropius.

Assembled from Kneafsey’s wildest imagination, the roster of ceramic artists who have visited the Museum includes both early vanguards of the studio pottery movement and next generation artists redefining what it means to work with clay. For more than two decades, Kneafsey’s efforts have earned this program national prominence.

A native Huntingtonian, Kathleen Kneafsey left her hometown at 17 years old and embarked on an exciting path of growth and discovery that ultimately, serendipitously brought her back to the place on the hill where it all began. “I had my first introduction to clay at the Museum, which led to a life choice that has been completely fulfilling,” Kneafsey said. “That first experience drove me to pursue study in clay, taking me to Clemson where I was fortunate enough to learn from a wonderfully gifted professor and mentor. I also met my husband there, and through his career travels, I was able to study clay in many different places with great artists. Then, we came back to my hometown, and the Museum and I became reacquainted.”

By chance, in 1997, Kneafsey saw an advertisement at Marshall University that the Huntington Museum of Art was looking for someone to teach children’s pottery. Perfectly suited for the role, her appointment soon expanded to include additional classes and, in 2000, after finishing graduate school at Miami University, the Museum offered her the position of Artist-in-Residence, a role she has cherished ever since. “My family has grown right along with this program,” Kneafsey said. “When I started in this position, I was expecting my first child, and the way I recall the dates of an artist’s visit is by how many children I had at the time or which child I was pregnant with. Many of the artists whom I asked to visit were chosen because they were parents themselves. I selfishly wanted to see how they juggled all the balls in the life of an artist, teacher, and parent. So, the growth of the program and the growth of my family, now three children in all, are completely intertwined.”

Kathleen Kneafsey’s lifelong commitment to ceramics education quietly underlies Serendipitous: A History of Clay at the Huntington Museum of Art. This sprawling exhibit, built from the Museum’s permanent collection, features contemporary ceramic artworks made by visiting artists in the Walter Gropius Master Artist Program. Brief recollections by Kneafsey, extruded from memory, accompany select artworks and enrich the gallery presentation. This is our history, and her story.

This exhibit is presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Keep the Light: Green Gardens & Growing Things features iconic works from the Huntington Museum of Art permanent collection that focus on horticulture and agriculture.

Among those iconic works in this exhibit are “The Garden Wall” by Winslow Homer; “Young Woman in a Landscape” by Pierre-Auguste Renoir; “The Harvester” by Julien Dupre; and “Love Tokens” by Jules Breton. “The works in this exhibit are all tied together by focusing on flowers, gardens, and other growing things,” said HMA Senior Curator/Exhibition Designer John Farley. “We will present works that express enjoyment of the sublime beauty of our world, as well as examples that reflect efforts to harness its life-giving elements. Sustenance of body, mind, and spirit is a common denominator. I hope that these themes will be uplifting for our visitors as we emerge from winter and look forward to the promise of spring.”

This exhibit will also include a new Huntington Museum of Art acquisition of a very rare and unusual color monoprint by West Virginia artist Blanche Lazzell. “We are pleased to showcase this new gift to HMA of art by trailblazing artist and teacher Blanche Lazzell titled ‘Hibiscus,’ ” Farley said. “We thank John A. Webb and Lazzelle W. Parker for this gift given in memory of Mr. and Mrs. Rufus G. Lazzell.” Blanche Lazzell is considered one of the most important women artists of 20th century, having been an early adopter of modernism and cubism in her work, which can often be seen in her print-work. It was Lazzell who once remarked that “Originality, Simplicity, Freedom of Expression, and above all Sincerity, with a clean cut block, are characteristics of a good wood block print.”

Other works included in this exhibit include lithographs by Salvador Dali and Romare Bearden, and an oil painting by Herbert Meyer titled “Three Poppies,” which is part of HMA’s renowned Daywood Collection.

In conjunction with this exhibit, a Gardening for Pollinators Presentation by HMA Conservatory Director Dr. Mike Beck takes place on May 28, 2022, at HMA beginning at 10 a.m. Call (304) 529-2701 for more information.

This exhibit is presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

The Huntington Museum of Art is pleased to announce it will host Memories & Inspiration: The Kerry and C. Betty Davis Collection of African American Art, celebrating the passion of an ordinary couple who spent more than 35 years as devoted connoisseurs, building a collection of vivid artworks that are both resonant and remarkably personal. Memories & Inspiration is on view at the Huntington Museum of Art from March 12 through June 12, 2022. This exhibit is sponsored at HMA by Leslie Petteys & William “Skip” Campbell.

Memories & Inspiration: The Kerry and C. Betty Davis Collection of African American Art presents 67 selected works from a body of art amassed over 35 years. Kerry, a retired mailman, and Betty, a former television news producer, gladly gave up many ordinary comforts in order to live with extraordinary paintings, drawings, prints, and sculptures as their principal luxuries. Their collection includes works by Romare Bearden, Beverly Buchanan, Elizabeth Catlett, Ernest T. Crichlow, Sam Gilliam, Loïs Mailou Jones, Jacob Lawrence, Gordon Parks, Alma Thomas, and Charles White, but Kerry and Betty do not search exclusively for well-known and/or documented artists. Rather, they focus on the more meaningful task of gathering and preserving a range of artistic approaches to the black image, in order to console the psyche and contribute to a more authentic articulation of the self.
The result is an eclectic gathering of pieces crossing different mediums, subjects, and styles by a group of artists of the African Diaspora who—in terms of training, experience, and expression—are strikingly diverse but unified in their use of cultural and historical narratives. As their collection has grown, so has the Davises’ storehouse of memories of discovering new works of art, building friendships with artists, and conversing with museum professionals and other collectors in their home. Memories & Inspiration brings together an awe-inspiring selection of works, but it is their personal resonance—their connection to the Davises’ hopes, passions, and everyday lives—that gives the collection its unique power.

Memories & Inspiration: The Kerry and C. Betty Davis Collection of African American Art was organized and toured by International Arts & Artists, Washington, DC

Kerry Davis, a native of Atlanta, Georgia, is a former sergeant of the United States Air Force, a retired carrier with the United States Postal Service, and an ordained deacon. He began collecting in the mid-1980s in partnership with his wife, Betty, who shared his passion for art. Begun originally with the modest aim of enhancing the interior decor of their mid-century split-level home in suburban Atlanta, the Davises’ collection has grown to over 300 works by some of the most distinguished African American artists of the twentieth century.
Inspired by previous generations of African American art collectors, who understood the importance of preserving cultural expression, memory, and imagery, Davis has sought to contribute to this legacy and be a source of inspiration for others in the community. The Davis residence—dubbed an “In-Home Museum” by visiting neighbors, parishioners, and friends—serves as a meeting place and cultural hub for artists, collectors, and art enthusiasts. Kerry and Betty have two children and one granddaughter.

ABOUT THE COLLECTION

International Arts & Artists in Washington, DC, is a nonprofit arts service organization dedicated to increasing cross-cultural understanding and exposure to the arts internationally, through exhibitions, programs and services to artists, arts institutions and the public. Visit ArtsandArtists.org

Huntington Museum of Art

This exhibit is sponsored at HMA by Leslie Petteys & William “Skip” Campbell.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

For more information on exhibits at the Huntington Museum of Art, visit hmoa.org or call (304) 529-2701. HMA is fully accessible.

West Virginia residents may obtain a summary of the registration and financial documents from the Secretary of State, State Capitol, Charleston, WV 25305. Registration does not imply endorsement.

The opening reception for this exhibit is scheduled for April 26, 2022, at 7 p.m. as part of the 4th Tuesday Tour Series at the Huntington Museum of Art.

Charles “Chuck” Burkart was a passionate collector of Asian art, military memorabilia, and books. A voracious reader with a keen intellect and a curious personality, Burkart spent more than four decades working in higher education with about 20 years at West Virginia University. Upon his passing in 2019, the Huntington Museum of Art received an astounding bequest of more than 350 artworks, nearly all 19th and 20th century Japanese woodblock prints. This survey exhibition, E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation presents East to West: Japanese Prints from the Burkart Collection, highlights 40 woodblock prints by 11 Japanese artists whose work captured Charles Burkart’s attention. With a nod to West Virginia, the unlikely destination for this exceptional collection, this title evokes the cultural exchange that characterizes the history of Japanese woodblock printmaking.

The Huntington Museum of Art has partnered with Akiko Praylow, Japanese Outreach Coordinator for Marshall University, to present a community project, One Thousand Origami Cranes, in the museum’s Education Gallery. The crane, an important creature in Japanese folklore, is said to live for 1,000 years. According to tradition, the gods will grant a special wish to anyone who folds a group of one thousand origami cranes (senbazuru). Praylow worked with Marshall University and the Huntington community to fold 1,000 paper cranes for this project – no small task! Japanese calligraphy made by students in Marshall University alumna Emiko Hori’s calligraphy studio will also be featured in this display.

This exhibit is presented by the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

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