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Art on a Limb

November 24 - January 3, 2021

The Huntington Museum of Art will present Art on a Limb, an exhibit of holiday trees decorated with ornaments created by regional artists from Nov. 24, 2020, through Jan. 3, 2021. Although the Art on a Limb exhibit will take place, Holiday Open House at HMA has been canceled in 2020 because of COVID-19 concerns.

The Art on a Limb exhibit showcases the work of artists in The Huntington Calligraphers’ Guild, Tri-Area Needle Arts, and West Virginia Bead Society. The Palette Tree in HMA’s Virginia Van Zandt Great Hall features individual artist palettes featuring the artwork of dozens of regional artists, including Paula Clendenin, Charles Jupiter Hamilton, Lee Ann Blevins, and the late Chuck Ripper, among others.

“The groups creating ornaments for ‘Art on a Limb’ have long relationships with the Huntington Museum of Art and take pride in the artworks they create to be displayed on the holiday trees,” said Cindy Dearborn, HMA Education Director. “We are grateful to them for their dedication to this exhibit.”

Art Quilts by Denise Roberts

January 16 - April 11, 2021

Award-winning quilt artist Denise Roberts credits the curved landscapes that surround the winding roads of her home state of West Virginia as a major influence on her work. Through the meandering arcs and bold shapes and colors that appear in her quilts, she achieves a brooding sense of energy and character. She reaps the bounty of the thousands of hours she has invested in studying and perfecting the technical side of her artistry, utilizing a masterful grasp of free and improvisational cutting, fabric dyeing and surface design to create textiles that stretch far beyond the historical bounds that often limit the quilter’s art. Though rooted in timeless craft traditions, her work is more akin to that of abstract painters, connected with them through a bold use of color and form in their purest manifestations.

A West Virginia resident since the age of nine, Roberts has lived in several locations around the state, including a stretch in the mid-1980s when she settled in Huntington. After she and her husband welcomed their first daughter, they moved to the Morgantown area, and in 2008 they bought a farm in Albright, West Virginia (Preston County), where she set up her professional studio and still resides. She spent many years following a traditional quilter’s path, but in 2005 she began studying with some of the leaders in the improvisational quilting field, especially Ohio-based artist Nancy Crow. Her work has been featured in many national and international exhibits, including Color Improvisations 2, which was shown at the Huntington Museum of Art in 2019.

This will be Roberts’ first solo show and will highlight selections from three thematic series that have occupied her attention over much of the past five years. All the quilts feature the energetic lines and striking colors that have become characteristic of the artist’s mature work. After many shows with a limited number of her work, the prospect of seeing a large selection together in one gallery will provide a tantalizing treat to museum visitors.

Presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the opening of the 1970 addition to the Huntington Museum of Art that was designed by Walter Gropius and his partners at The Architects Collaborative, the museum is planning an exhibition on the Bauhaus, the highly influential school that Gropius founded in Weimar, Germany, in 1919.

Titled The Wide Reach of the Bauhaus, this exhibition will focus on the penetrating influence of the school and its students and teachers throughout the world. Many of these remarkable artists were forced to scatter from Germany to escape a government that was hostile to modernist art and design, so they took their ideas to communities around the globe, even to small and unlikely places such as Aspen, Colorado, and Black Mountain, North Carolina.

The Wide Reach of the Bauhaus will look at the incredible impact of the individuals who were associated with the school. It will feature work that was created during the Bauhaus years of 1919-1933 as well as later work by the artists, architects and designers who moved on to successful careers in the United States and elsewhere. Many of the leading figures in 20th century art and design will be featured, including Gropius, Josef Albers, Anni Albers, Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, Marcel Breuer, Mies van der Rohe, Lyonel Feininger, Herbert Bayer, and Laszlo Moholy-Nagy. The exhibition will include paintings, prints, film, photography, graphic design and drawings, as well as decorative arts such as pottery, furniture and textiles, and will include an emphasis on the school and its colossal influence upon 20th century architectural design.

From its earliest days of existence, the Bauhaus pursued a new approach to art, one that looked forward rather than to the past. It was committed to erase the gulf between “fine art” and “craft” and embraced the potential of modern machine technology to make good design available and affordable to the masses. Though students at the Bauhaus followed a structured course that emphasized basic studies in color and form followed by hands-on experiences with various materials such as clay, wood, metal, glass and textiles, they were encouraged to experiment to create work that broke new ground. Despite being caught up in political controversies and faced with constant financial problems during the turbulent times that gripped Germany in the years following World War I, the school produced a host of individual artists whose work stands out prominently in the history of 20th century art. Many would go on to serve as teachers in prestigious universities around the world such as Harvard and Yale or were involved in experimental and influential educational projects at institutions such as Black Mountain College in North Carolina or the New Bauhaus in Chicago.

Each of the artists has a story to tell, from the tragic but courageous work of former Bauhaus student Friedl Dicker-Brandeis, who taught children’s art classes in the concentration camp at Terezin (Poland) before being murdered by the Nazis in the Auschwitz-Birkenau camp, to American emigres Walter Gropius, Josef and Anni Albers, Marcel Breuer, Herbert Bayer and Werner Drewes, all of whom enjoyed long and successful careers in their adopted land. Many of the works in the exhibit are drawn from the growing number of Bauhaus items in the HMA holdings, while others have been borrowed from public and private collections.

This exhibition is supported, in part, by a gift from the Saint John’s Trust, in Memory of Anna Virginia Morgan.

This project is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts. To find out more about how National Endowment for the Arts grants impact individuals and communities, visit www.arts.gov.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Through an exhibition of photographs, documents and drawings, the story of the involvement of great Bauhaus architect Walter Gropius with the Huntington Museum of Art will be presented this fall as a commemorative tribute on the 50th anniversary of the opening of the expanded facility.

Walter Gropius and the Huntington Galleries Building Expansion Project exhibition will be on view at the Huntington Museum of Art from October 10, 2020, through February 17, 2021.

On October 23, 1970, the Huntington Galleries (now Huntington Museum of Art) opened an addition to its facility that greatly expanded its exhibition space and added a 300-seat auditorium, a separate studio building and an art reference library. The building was designed by famed architect Walter Gropius and his colleagues at The Architects Collaborative. 

How did it happen that a world-famous architect came to Huntington to work on an expansion of the museum? The story began in 1966 with the award of a major grant from the Henry L. and Grace Rardin Doherty Foundation that was earmarked for the building project. The leader of the Doherty Foundation at the time of the grant was Walter L. Brown, whose father, Douglas W. Brown, had been a partner with museum founder Herbert Fitzpatrick in the Huntington law firm Fitzpatrick, Brown and Davis.

A committee that was appointed by the Museum’s Board of Trustees to find an architect for the project was frustrated by their inability to attract a prestigious firm to head the effort. The answer to the dilemma finally came about through the efforts of Eloise Campbell Long, a member of the Huntington Galleries Board. She and her husband were regular vacationers at Castle Hot Springs, a resort in Arizona, a place that was also frequented by Walter Gropius and his wife Ise. Mrs. Long had become friends with the couple during their many visits to the resort, and when the museum’s expansion project was announced, she audaciously asked Walter Gropius if he would undertake the design of the new wing in Huntington. Much to her pleasant surprise, he agreed to take on the project in partnership with his firm, The Architects Collaborative of Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Though Gropius passed away before the Huntington project was completed, his influence had a major impact on the museum, not just in terms of the building, but also in his emphasis on a studio-based art education program. At the groundbreaking ceremony in 1968, he outlined a vision for the new facility.  “It will be of incalculable value for Huntington and its neighboring towns to have at their disposal a greatly broadened institute…to pursue both the improvement of the historic knowledge of art as well as the artistic creativity of their own young generation for the cultural benefit of the whole community.”  He emphasized the importance of art instruction in the studios, expressing a desire “that such activities may flourish here under the stimulation of talented teachers and of great examples of works of art exhibited in this gallery.” 

This exhibition is supported, in part, by a gift from the Saint John’s Trust, in Memory of Anna Virginia Morgan.

This project is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts. To find out more about how National Endowment for the Arts grants impact individuals and communities, visit www.arts.gov.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

To observe the 50th Anniversary this fall of the Marshall University plane crash, the Huntington Museum of Art will present an exhibition of work by Harry Bertoia, the artist who created the Marshall University Memorial Fountain.

Titled Rising, Renewing, Reaching: Harry Bertoia and the Marshall University Memorial Fountain, this exhibition is Presented by the Polan Family in Memory of Dorothy and Lake Polan, Jr. This exhibition will be on view in HMA’s Switzer Gallery from Sept. 19 through Jan. 3, 2021. An exhibit of Marshall University Fountain photographs by David Pittenger will be on view in HMA’s Virginia Van Zandt Great Hall during the run of the Bertoia exhibition.

Celia Bertoia, the daughter of the artist, is tentatively scheduled to present The Dr. Lawrence B. and Shirley Gang Memorial Lecture at HMA on Nov. 13, 2020, from 5 to 7 p.m. (Please follow HMA social media platforms for updates on this event, which may be presented virtually.)

Harry Bertoia’s Memorial Fountain on the Marshall University campus has become a powerful symbol of the university itself, serving as a centerpiece for the school grounds and a vigilant reminder of the terrible airline tragedy that occurred on November 14, 1970, when 75 players, coaches and supporters of the football team perished.

Twice yearly, a solemn ceremony is held at the Fountain, attended by large crowds who mark the moment, often tearfully, as the water is turned off in the fall and the flow is restored in the spring. A small plaque accompanies the sculpture with a simple statement that acknowledges the artwork’s purpose: “They shall live on in the hearts of their families and friends forever and this memorial records their loss to the university and the community.”

The choice of Bertoia as the designer of an on-campus memorial to mark the Marshall tragedy is an interesting case study in the often-contentious process of determining what constitutes a proper symbol for public memory. Soon after the tragic event occurred, acting Marshall University President Donald Dedmon appointed a committee to decide on a memorial for the victims of the crash. Several ideas were discussed, including proposals to feature a buffalo or football players as part of the memorial’s motif. Architect Keith Dean, who had designed the Marshall Student Center on campus, suggested Harry Bertoia as a candidate to create the memorial sculpture. Bertoia had been recommended to Dean by Roberta Emerson, Director of the Huntington Museum of Art, who knew of his work through the artist’s sculpture in the museum’s holdings. Dean hoped that Bertoia’s work could be placed in a spot in front of the Center that had already been designed to house a fountain (construction on the Student Center had begun in 1969, well before the air tragedy occurred).

Much like discussions that occurred around Maya Lin’s design for the Vietnam War Memorial in Washington, D.C., an emotional debate occurred about the MU commission, centered upon whether an abstract work of art could properly commemorate the tragic loss of life. High-ranking Marshall University Athletic Department officials maligned Bertoia’s design, condemning the choice of a “surrealist” artist and questioning whether the work was a tribute to “flower children” or football players. Nevertheless, the committee, headed by Huntington businessman Lake Polan, Jr., voted 5-4 to commission Bertoia to create the memorial. Once the fountain arrived from Bertoia’s Pennsylvania studio and was dedicated on November 12, 1972, public sentiment swung in favor of the work and it has since become a beloved symbol of the University.

To mark the 50th anniversary of the Marshall air tragedy, HMA will feature an exhibit that displays the broad range of the multi-talented Bertoia’s work, including his iconic furniture designs as well as prints, sculpture and jewelry, with a focus upon his work on the MU Fountain.

Presented by the Polan Family in Memory of Dorothy and Lake Polan, Jr.

Presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

This program is made possible by funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the federal CARES Act through the West Virginia Humanities Council. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations do not necessarily represent those of the West Virginia Humanities Council or the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Since 1992, the Walter Gropius Master Artist Program has brought nationally and internationally known artists to the Huntington Museum of Art for workshops, lectures and exhibits. Legacy: The Walter Gropius Master Artist Program will exhibit contemporary work added to HMA’s Permanent Collection by artists who have participated in this innovative program for close to three decades.

The Walter Gropius Master Artist Program came about through a bequest from the estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, whose son, Alex, served on the museum’s Building Committee during the time of the expansion. At the groundbreaking ceremony in 1968, Walter Gropius outlined a vision for the new facility. “It will be of incalculable value for Huntington and its neighboring towns to have at their disposal a greatly broadened institute…to pursue both the improvement of the historic knowledge of art as well as the artistic creativity of their own young generation for the cultural benefit of the whole community.”  Gropius emphasized the importance of art instruction in the studios, expressing a desire “that such activities may flourish here under the stimulation of talented teachers and of great examples of works of art exhibited in this gallery.” 

Alex Booth was extremely impressed with Walter Gropius and his educational philosophy and it was his hope that the museum could begin a program that would fulfill Walter Gropius’s vision for the new facility.

Beginning in 1992 with a month-long residency by American painter Robert Cottingham, the program evolved into a series of three-day workshops, each of which was accompanied by a public lecture by the artist and an exhibition of the artist’s work. In addition, through separate funding from sources such as the Donald B. Harper Endowment, the museum has made a commitment to purchasing work by each visiting artist for the permanent collection.

The list of artists who have visited is impressive and includes Philip Pearlstein, Alfred Leslie, Wolf Kahn, Beverly Pepper, Sandy Skoglund, Willie Cole, Miriam Schapiro and Jerry Uelsmann as well as three women who have been awarded “Genius” grants from the MacArthur Foundation – Carrie Mae Weems, Joyce Scott and Judy Pfaff. Many different media have been emphasized, though pottery has received special attention with instructors such as Warren MacKenzie, Val Cushing and Beth Cavener.

This project is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts. To find out more about how National Endowment for the Arts grants impact individuals and communities, visit www.arts.gov.

Presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

The Walter Gropius Master Artist Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition, as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum in indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, the late Alex Booth, Jr., for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

The Huntington Museum of Art plans a virtual Walter Gropius Master Artist Ceramic Symposium on Nov. 5-8, 2020. The Symposium will feature six ceramic artists – Linda Christianson, Justin Donofrio, Sanam Emami, Chris Gustin, and Michael Hunt and Naomi Dalglish of Bandana Pottery. The symposium begins on Thursday, Nov. 5, 2020, at 7 p.m., with an online public video lecture series, featuring all six Walter Gropius Master Artists.A free virtual symposium workshop will take place on Friday, Nov. 6, and Saturday, Nov. 7, beginning at 10 a.m., featuring videos of the six ceramic artists demonstrating their process. The Symposium concludes Sunday, Nov. 8, at 1 p.m., with a free virtual gallery walk of the Walter Gropius Master Artists’ exhibition at the Huntington Museum of Art. This free online lecture series will be narrated by HMA Visual Artist in Residence Kathleen Kneafsey. To view these virtual programs, visit hmoa.org or the Huntington Museum of Art’s Facebook page.

Here are six short biographies shared by the participating symposium artists:

Linda Christianson Biography

Linda Christianson is an independent studio potter who lives and works in rural Minnesota. She studied at Hamline University (St. Paul, Minnesota) and the Banff Centre School of Fine Arts (Banff, Alberta, Canada). She exhibits nationally and internationally, including one-person exhibits in London and St. Louis. Her pieces are in numerous public and private collections, including the American Museum of Ceramic Art and the Glenboe Museum. An itinerant educator, Linda has taught at colleges and universities, including Carlton College and the Hartford Art School. She received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and
the McKnight Foundation. Her recent writing appeared in Studio Potter and The Log Book. She says one of her goals is to make a better cup each day.

Justin Donofrio Biography

Justin Donofrio grew up in Santa Cruz, California, where he was introduced to pottery at Cabrillo Community College. He then joined the vibrant Colorado community of artists in 2013 in the Roaring Fork Valley, where he continued his clay education with the support of Anderson Ranch, The Carbondale Clay Center, and The Studio for Arts and Works (SAW). He remained in Colorado to complete a BFA from Colorado State
University in 2016. He is represented in galleries throughout the U.S. and abroad. Donofrio has been a Windgate Summer Scholar at the Archie Bray Foundation and resident at Haystack Mountain School of Crafts. He has been an exhibiting artist and tour co-manager with the Artstream Nomadic Gallery, in addition to being selected as one of Ceramics Monthly’s 2018 Emerging Artists. He is currently pursuing his MFA in ceramics at Alfred University.

Sanam Emami Biography

Sanam Emami is a studio potter living in Fort Collins, Colorado, with her husband, Del Harrow, and their son, William. She received a BA in History from James Madison University in Virginia, and an MFA in Ceramics from New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University. Currently, she is an Associate Professor of Pottery at Colorado State University. She was a Visiting Assistant Professor in Ceramics at Alfred
University, resident artist at the Archie Bray Foundation in Montana, and has lectured at the Office for the Arts at Harvard University; the Kansas City Art Institute; Arizona State University Art Museum-Ceramic Research Center; and NCECA in Louisville, Kentucky. She received a New York Foundation for the Arts Grant for Craft and her work has been in exhibitions at numerous galleries across the country including The Society of Arts and Crafts, Boston; The Artstream Nomadic Gallery; Harvey Meadows Gallery, Aspen; Schaller Gallery; and Hostler Burrows.

Chris Gustin Biography

Chris Gustin is a studio artist and an Emeritus Professor at the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth. He received his BFA from the Kansas City Art Institute in 1975, and his MFA from Alfred University in 1977. Gustin lives and works in South Dartmouth, Massachusetts. Gustin’s work is published extensively and is represented in numerous public and private collections, including the Renwick Gallery of the National Museum of American Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Victoria and Albert Museum, the World Ceramic Exposition Foundation in Icheon, Korea, the American Museum of Ceramic Art, the Currier Museum of Art, the Yingge Museum in Taipai, and the Daum Museum of Contemporary Art. With more than 50 solo exhibitions, he has exhibited, lectured and taught workshops in the United States, Caribbean,
South America, Europe, the Middle East and Asia. He has received two National Endowment for the Arts Artist Fellowships, and four Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist Fellowships, the most recent in 2017. He is a member of the International Academy of Ceramics and was elected to the American Craft Council College of Fellows in 2016. He was awarded the Masters of the Medium award from the Renwick Alliance in 2017. Gustin is co-founder of the Watershed Center for the Ceramic Arts in Maine, and currently serves as Honorary Trustee on its board.

Michael Hunt and Naomi Dalglish of Bandana Pottery Biographies

Michael Hunt and Naomi Dalglish collaborate in making wood-fired pottery. They combine coarse local clays, white slips and ash glazes to make the deeply layered surfaces for which they are known. After getting hooked on clay in high school, Hunt came to Penland School of Crafts, where Will Ruggles and Douglas Rankin became teachers and mentors to him. Several years later he was invited to go to Korea to learn the
traditional method of making large Ongii storage jars with master Ongii potter Oh Hyang Jong. Dalglish began making pottery with her grandmother as a child. She studied clay at Earlham College with Mike Theideman, a former apprentice of Warren MacKenzie. After college, Dalglish came to Penland to take a kiln-building class and met Hunt, who was building a kiln at his studio in the area. Dalglish and Hunt now work together as full-time potters, firing their wood kiln four times a year, and occasionally teaching workshops. Their pottery is named Bandana Pottery after the small community in which they live. They exhibit their work nationally and internationally.

This project is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts. To find out more about how National Endowment for the Arts grants impact individuals and communities, visit www.arts.gov.

This project is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Presented with support from the Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

The Walter Gropius Master Artist Series is funded through the generosity of the Estate of Roxanna Y. Booth, who wished to assist in the development of an art education program in accordance with the proposals of Walter Gropius, who designed the Museum’s Gropius Addition, as well as the Gropius Studios. The Museum in indebted to Roxanna Y. Booth’s son, the late Alex Booth, Jr., for his participation in the concept development of the Gropius Master Artists Workshops.

For more information on events at the Huntington Museum of Art, visit www.hmoa.org or call (304) 529-2701. HMA is fully accessible.

West Virginia residents may obtain a summary of the registration and financial documents from the Secretary of State, State Capitol, Charleston, WV 25305. Registration does not imply endorsement.

The wide expanse of the United States, from “California to the New York Island,” as Woody Guthrie penned in his famous anthem, carries with it an imposing history that includes stories of heroism and tragedy, prosperity and poverty, freedom and enslavement, tradition and upheaval, and war and peace.

The complex fabric of the nation is woven with millions of individual experiences that have spawned a material culture that reflects the varied backgrounds and contributions of people who have inhabited the land. From strictly utilitarian objects to luxurious objets d’art that were obtainable by only a small percentage of the populace, each item reflects upon the larger culture and values of American society.

Beginning with a look at objects from the indigenous cultures that existed before European contact, the show moves forward in time to the settlement of the land by immigrants from other nations. Portraiture provided an important record of the faces of those who could either afford such a luxury or had interesting stories to tell, ranging from one of the earliest portraits done of European settlers in the New World, A Portrait of Henry Gibbs, by Freake-Gibbs Limner, on loan from the Juliet Art Museum in Charleston, West Virginia, to multiple images of Native American subjects by artists such as George Catlin and Charles Bird King. The flora and fauna of the American lands were fascinating to both European and native-born artists, so representative works that highlight the natural history of the land will be included. The rugged and often pristine beauty of the growing nation will be showcased in numerous scenic landscapes.

As settlement of the land increased, a thriving demand for decorative items grew in proportion. Items for homes ranging from utilitarian woven goods and stoneware to luxurious furniture and finely engraved tableware were made for the growing class of consumers. Glass, pottery, quilts, furniture and metalwork will be displayed, highlighting the strong craft traditions that drew inspiration from the melting pot of cultures in the developing nation. Various means of traversing the land will be a point of emphasis, from images of early carriages, ships and locomotives to modern-day vehicles.

Efforts to forge a national identity will be presented through images of near-mythical heroes and symbols ranging from the log cabin to historical figures such as George Washington and Daniel Boone. The constant specter of conflict, whether with outside foes or those within the same society is represented through the work of artists and designers as they addressed military and political struggles from the Revolutionary period onward.

Drawn primarily from the HMA permanent collection, the show will look at the American experience through the nation’s artistic output. Well-known artists will be featured alongside anonymous designers, folk artists and craftsmen, highlighting the intense creative spirit that has permeated the American land for centuries.

Presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

This program is made possible by funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the federal CARES Act through the West Virginia Humanities Council. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations do not necessarily represent those of the West Virginia Humanities Council or the National Endowment for the Humanities.

From the 1960s forward, artists began to embrace printmaking with a wide-reaching enthusiasm that had not been seen in previous years. In the United States, opportunities to publish fine art prints blossomed as new print studios popped up around the country, including Universal Limited Art Editions in West Islip, New York, Tamarind Lithography Workshop in Los Angeles, Crown Point Press in Oakland, California, and Gemini G.E.L. in New York City. Several universities established fine art presses, such as those at the University of South Florida (Graphicstudio) and the University of Wisconsin (Tandem Press), and many independent nonprofit presses were created such as Anchor Graphics in Chicago.

For artists, the chance to find new means of expression in collaboration with master printers presented an enticing opportunity to showcase their work in a new light, so many prominent painters and sculptors began to explore printmaking with a renewed vigor. For collectors, editioned works by leading artists became affordable and readily available, leading to an unprecedented art sales boom. The Huntington Museum of Art has an impressive collection of prints from the modern era that continues to grow through new acquisitions. This exhibit will showcase works ranging from prints from the 1960s by established masters such as Pablo Picasso, Alexander Calder and Louise Nevelson to new works by contemporary women artists such as Barbara Takenaga, Maria Tomasula, and Claudia Bernardi. A variety of printmaking processes will be on display ranging from traditional fine art mediums such as lithography and etching to the experimental techniques that were embraced during the innovative period of the latter 20th century.

Presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Art of the Portrait

June 20 - September 20, 2020

The act of creating a likeness of yourself or another human being has been a fundamental component of the western idea of art, beginning in early civilizations and reaching full glory in the age of the Renaissance.

Portraiture served the needs of individuals and families by creating an historical record of a subject for present and future generations. It was also a powerful tool for governments and religious organizations, as images of those individuals who were deemed to be important appeared on the walls of palaces, courts and churches and were often distributed to the masses through likenesses on coins or currency or through prints, book illustrations or public sculpture.

Over the centuries, portraiture provided an important stream of revenue for painters and sculptors, though it was often seen as a subservient and tiresome undertaking that hindered creativity. The idea of an exact physical representation has historically been held up as the standard for portraitists, though that idea lost traction once photography became a cheaper and more accurate substitute, and an accompanying shift in styles began to favor artistic abstraction. Despite a turn away from an emphasis on high-style imagery, portraiture remains an important means of expression for the visual artist and it continues to fuel a debate on the ideas of identity and representation in art.

The Huntington Museum of Art has a strong collection of formal historic portraits, especially from 18th and 19th century Great Britain. Beginning in the 1950s, gifts from donors such as George Bagby established an important foundation for the collection, adding works by Sir Joshua Reynolds, George Romney, Gilbert Stuart and other significant painters. Over the years the collection has broadened to include a much wider range of likenesses, from ancient Roman portrait busts to more abstract works by artists such as Vanessa Bell and Chuck Close. A selection from the HMA holdings will highlight a variety of portraits in several mediums.

Presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

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