Past

Studio Selections

May 21 - June 12, 2022

The Huntington Museum of Art will display artwork created by participants in its studio classes and workshops during the Studio Selections exhibit from May 21 through June 12, 2022. A free opening reception for this exhibit will take place on Tuesday, May 24, at 7 p.m. as part of the 4th Tuesday Tour Series at HMA.

“We are excited to give participants in the art classes and workshops at the Huntington Museum of Art the chance to display their artwork in a museum setting,” said HMA Education Director Cindy Dearborn. “It is also nice for museum visitors to see the quality of the work taking place in our art studios here at the Huntington Museum of Art.”

Recent studio classes offered at HMA include ceramics, photography, painting, printmaking and drawing.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Studio Selections

Portfolio 2022

April 16 - May 15, 2022

The Huntington Museum of Art presents the work of high school senior art students in the Portfolio 2022 exhibit, which is on view from April 16 through May 15, 2022. A virtual awards program will take place on April 16, at 2 p.m. on HMA’s YouTube channel. Because of the pandemic, HMA has narrowed the focus of this year’s exhibit to highlight the work of high school seniors as it also did in 2021.

Twenty student artworks from 13 Tri-State high schools are featured in this year’s exhibit. Participating high schools include Cabell Midland, Huntington, Logan, Poca, Point Pleasant, Spring Valley, and Tug Valley in West Virginia; Ironton and Rock Hill in Ohio; and Greenup, Paul G. Blazer, Raceland-Worthington, and Russell in Kentucky.

HMA Senior Curator/Exhibition Designer John Farley selected Kendra Fischer as the winner of the 2022 Janet Bromley Excellence in the Arts Award for her textile collage work titled “Blue Jean Bull.” The award winner attends Spring Valley High School, where Sara Tess Hager is her art teacher. All student artists participating in the exhibit will receive small cash prizes and certificates for being chosen by their teachers to participate in the exhibit.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Honoré Daumier (1808-1879) was a French artist renowned as a brilliant caricaturist with boundless imagination. For most of the artist’s life, he earned a living producing sharp-witted cartoons and provocative caricatures that satirized his countrymen.

Published in newspapers, periodicals, journals, and illustrated pamphlets, these striking images, often pointed and uncompromising, offer commentary on 19th century France – a time of social, cultural, and political upheaval. From the July Revolution of 1830 and the ascendance of the upper middle class, or bourgeoisie, to the fall of the Second Napoleonic Empire in 1870, Daumier’s images engaged the French populace through the weekly press.

He was politically aligned with the working class, in antagonistic opposition to the French constitutional monarchy and those who profited from it. His convictions occasionally lead to retribution and censorship. Early in Daumier’s career he was charged, fined, and briefly imprisoned for a scathing caricature that depicted an indolent French King Louis Phillippe gobbling bags of coins extracted from the nation’s workers – many of whom lived in miserable poverty.

Honoré Daumier mastered the recently invented lithographic printmaking process, a faster and less expensive method of mass-producing prints compared to the traditional practices of engraving and etching. He was prolific and drew 3,958 lithographs before the onset of blindness halted his work. Despite his reputation for acerbic political statements, many of these prints were lighthearted satires of contemporary life in industrialized French society.

Through the Eyes of Honoré Daumier will present selections from the Huntington Museum of Art’s impressive collection of lithographs by this influential artist, most of them gifts of the Armand Hammer Foundation. Although these works reflect the culture of a particular country and era through the eyes of one keen citizen, Daumier’s astute observations about humanity echo into the present.

This exhibit is presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Keep the Light: Green Gardens & Growing Things features iconic works from the Huntington Museum of Art permanent collection that focus on horticulture and agriculture.

Among those iconic works in this exhibit are “The Garden Wall” by Winslow Homer; “Young Woman in a Landscape” by Pierre-Auguste Renoir; “The Harvester” by Julien Dupre; and “Love Tokens” by Jules Breton. “The works in this exhibit are all tied together by focusing on flowers, gardens, and other growing things,” said HMA Senior Curator/Exhibition Designer John Farley. “We will present works that express enjoyment of the sublime beauty of our world, as well as examples that reflect efforts to harness its life-giving elements. Sustenance of body, mind, and spirit is a common denominator. I hope that these themes will be uplifting for our visitors as we emerge from winter and look forward to the promise of spring.”

This exhibit will also include a new Huntington Museum of Art acquisition of a very rare and unusual color monoprint by West Virginia artist Blanche Lazzell. “We are pleased to showcase this new gift to HMA of art by trailblazing artist and teacher Blanche Lazzell titled ‘Hibiscus,’ ” Farley said. “We thank John A. Webb and Lazzelle W. Parker for this gift given in memory of Mr. and Mrs. Rufus G. Lazzell.” Blanche Lazzell is considered one of the most important women artists of 20th century, having been an early adopter of modernism and cubism in her work, which can often be seen in her print-work. It was Lazzell who once remarked that “Originality, Simplicity, Freedom of Expression, and above all Sincerity, with a clean cut block, are characteristics of a good wood block print.”

Other works included in this exhibit include lithographs by Salvador Dali and Romare Bearden, and an oil painting by Herbert Meyer titled “Three Poppies,” which is part of HMA’s renowned Daywood Collection.

In conjunction with this exhibit, a Gardening for Pollinators Presentation by HMA Conservatory Director Dr. Mike Beck takes place on May 28, 2022, at HMA beginning at 10 a.m. Call (304) 529-2701 for more information.

This exhibit is presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

The Huntington Museum of Art is pleased to announce it will host Memories & Inspiration: The Kerry and C. Betty Davis Collection of African American Art, celebrating the passion of an ordinary couple who spent more than 35 years as devoted connoisseurs, building a collection of vivid artworks that are both resonant and remarkably personal. Memories & Inspiration is on view at the Huntington Museum of Art from March 12 through June 12, 2022. This exhibit is sponsored at HMA by Leslie Petteys & William “Skip” Campbell.

Memories & Inspiration: The Kerry and C. Betty Davis Collection of African American Art presents 67 selected works from a body of art amassed over 35 years. Kerry, a retired mailman, and Betty, a former television news producer, gladly gave up many ordinary comforts in order to live with extraordinary paintings, drawings, prints, and sculptures as their principal luxuries. Their collection includes works by Romare Bearden, Beverly Buchanan, Elizabeth Catlett, Ernest T. Crichlow, Sam Gilliam, Loïs Mailou Jones, Jacob Lawrence, Gordon Parks, Alma Thomas, and Charles White, but Kerry and Betty do not search exclusively for well-known and/or documented artists. Rather, they focus on the more meaningful task of gathering and preserving a range of artistic approaches to the black image, in order to console the psyche and contribute to a more authentic articulation of the self.
The result is an eclectic gathering of pieces crossing different mediums, subjects, and styles by a group of artists of the African Diaspora who—in terms of training, experience, and expression—are strikingly diverse but unified in their use of cultural and historical narratives. As their collection has grown, so has the Davises’ storehouse of memories of discovering new works of art, building friendships with artists, and conversing with museum professionals and other collectors in their home. Memories & Inspiration brings together an awe-inspiring selection of works, but it is their personal resonance—their connection to the Davises’ hopes, passions, and everyday lives—that gives the collection its unique power.

Memories & Inspiration: The Kerry and C. Betty Davis Collection of African American Art was organized and toured by International Arts & Artists, Washington, DC

Kerry Davis, a native of Atlanta, Georgia, is a former sergeant of the United States Air Force, a retired carrier with the United States Postal Service, and an ordained deacon. He began collecting in the mid-1980s in partnership with his wife, Betty, who shared his passion for art. Begun originally with the modest aim of enhancing the interior decor of their mid-century split-level home in suburban Atlanta, the Davises’ collection has grown to over 300 works by some of the most distinguished African American artists of the twentieth century.
Inspired by previous generations of African American art collectors, who understood the importance of preserving cultural expression, memory, and imagery, Davis has sought to contribute to this legacy and be a source of inspiration for others in the community. The Davis residence—dubbed an “In-Home Museum” by visiting neighbors, parishioners, and friends—serves as a meeting place and cultural hub for artists, collectors, and art enthusiasts. Kerry and Betty have two children and one granddaughter.

ABOUT THE COLLECTION

International Arts & Artists in Washington, DC, is a nonprofit arts service organization dedicated to increasing cross-cultural understanding and exposure to the arts internationally, through exhibitions, programs and services to artists, arts institutions and the public. Visit ArtsandArtists.org

Huntington Museum of Art

This exhibit is sponsored at HMA by Leslie Petteys & William “Skip” Campbell.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

For more information on exhibits at the Huntington Museum of Art, visit hmoa.org or call (304) 529-2701. HMA is fully accessible.

West Virginia residents may obtain a summary of the registration and financial documents from the Secretary of State, State Capitol, Charleston, WV 25305. Registration does not imply endorsement.

The opening reception for this exhibit is scheduled for April 26, 2022, at 7 p.m. as part of the 4th Tuesday Tour Series at the Huntington Museum of Art.

Charles “Chuck” Burkart was a passionate collector of Asian art, military memorabilia, and books. A voracious reader with a keen intellect and a curious personality, Burkart spent more than four decades working in higher education with about 20 years at West Virginia University. Upon his passing in 2019, the Huntington Museum of Art received an astounding bequest of more than 350 artworks, nearly all 19th and 20th century Japanese woodblock prints. This survey exhibition, E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation presents East to West: Japanese Prints from the Burkart Collection, highlights 40 woodblock prints by 11 Japanese artists whose work captured Charles Burkart’s attention. With a nod to West Virginia, the unlikely destination for this exceptional collection, this title evokes the cultural exchange that characterizes the history of Japanese woodblock printmaking.

The Huntington Museum of Art has partnered with Akiko Praylow, Japanese Outreach Coordinator for Marshall University, to present a community project, One Thousand Origami Cranes, in the museum’s Education Gallery. The crane, an important creature in Japanese folklore, is said to live for 1,000 years. According to tradition, the gods will grant a special wish to anyone who folds a group of one thousand origami cranes (senbazuru). Praylow worked with Marshall University and the Huntington community to fold 1,000 paper cranes for this project – no small task! Japanese calligraphy made by students in Marshall University alumna Emiko Hori’s calligraphy studio will also be featured in this display.

This exhibit is presented by the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

The artist is scheduled to discuss her work in a free public presentation on Thursday, March 10, 2022, at 7 p.m. A three-day workshop titled “Pattern and Shallow Relief Carving—A Deep Dive” will be presented on March 11-13, 2022. Call (304) 529-2701 for workshop fee information.

Sarah Heimann is a studio potter in Lebanon, New Hampshire, and an instructor at Dartmouth College’s ceramic studio. Her work has been published in Lark’s 500 Cups, 500 Vases, 500 Teapots, Studio Potter magazine, and Surfaces, Glazes, and Firing by Angelica Pozo. She has been awarded a McKnight Artist Residency, Jerome Artist Project Grant, and a McKnight Artist Fellowship. She has an MFA in Ceramics from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities.

The following is her artist statement:

I am a potter. I work with clay, throwing and hand-building pots. I am passionate about weight and balance, questions of rim durability, how a foot meets a table. I intend my pieces to live in domestic spaces.

I spend hours with pieces cradled in my lap, raking light allowing me to see curves and planes of the evolving surface. As I carve into the pot, I consider how a ladder might stand in front of a vine, how a moon might overhang a building, and what would happen if a moon was on the ground. I improvise with myself each step of the way, trying to catch myself unawares. What would happen if I did this? Did that work? Is it clumsy? Can I make it more graceful? Does it still stand evenly?

These concerns are fundamental. I believe objects we live with should be made properly. The underside of a handle should be comfortable, curves should be confident. Feet should be well finished. Drawings should make sense within the context of the pot they live on.

When the pots are finished, people are often uncertain of their original material. They recognize time spent, and respond to the surface, but for comprehension, my pieces demand interaction. It is in handling that utilitarian underpinnings are understood. It is in carving that the drawing comes alive, and it is in use that the pieces come alive.

This exhibit is presented with support from The Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

The Huntington Museum of Art will present the exhibit titled InSights: Visionary Art by Artists who are Blind from Dec. 7, 2021, to Jan. 9, 2022. The public is invited to attend the “2021 American Printing House for the Blind Huntington Speaker Series Session: Inclusive Arts” event on Dec. 7, 2021, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Huntington Museum of Art. Admission to this Dec. 7 event is free.

The “2021 APH Huntington Speaker Series Session: Inclusive Arts” will begin with a reception and viewing of the exhibition in HMA’s Virginia Van Zandt Great Hall from 6 to 6:30 p.m., followed by a guided tour of selections from the APH InSights Art collection, an annual juried exhibition featuring artists who are blind or visually impaired from around the world, from 6:30 to 7 p.m. The event concludes with a panel discussion from 7 to 7:30 p.m.

Robert Guillen, Special Programs Coordinator at APH and curator of the Insights Art exhibition, will lead the 6:30 p.m. guided tour of two-and three-dimensional selections, including painting, sculpture, and craft, from the Insights Art exhibition and share information about the history of Insights Art, its featured artists, and the impact of this exhibition opportunity.

The 7 p.m. panel discussion on the impact of inclusive arts will take place in the HMA’s Grace Rardin Doherty Auditorium and will feature Guillen; Kathleen Kneafsey, HMA Visual Artist in Residence and teacher of the HMA clay studio class for people who are blind or visually impaired; and John Farley, HMA Senior Curator & Exhibition Designer. The “APH Huntington Speaker Series: Inclusive Arts” is free to attend and is presented in partnership with HMA.

Taking place throughout 2021-2022, the “APH Huntington Speaker Series” is pleased to present a diverse series of presentations and special guest speakers addressing the experiences, challenges, opportunities, and perspectives of people who are blind or visually impaired.

Founded in 1858 with a charter to provide accessible materials for all people in the United States who are blind, the American Printing House for the Blind (APH), based in Louisville, KY, has provided innovative products and essential services to people with vision loss for more than 160 years. The mission of APH is to empower people who are blind or visually impaired by providing accessible and innovative products, materials, and services for lifelong success. Today, APH is the world’s largest nonprofit organization creating accessible products and programs designed to support the educational, workplace, and independent living needs of people who are blind or visually impaired. Established in 2020, APH Huntington, a program of APH, provides access technology trainings and community learning opportunities addressing the needs of people with vision loss in Huntington.

Since 1992, the American Printing House for the Blind (APH) has hosted an art contest for artists who happen to be blind. Both amateur and professional artists from around the world enter their artwork in a juried art competition. Original works of two-dimensional art, sculpture, or craft are considered each year by a panel of artists, art educators, and others in the field of art. Winners receive prizes, experience their artwork displayed in an annual exhibit, and have a chance to travel to Louisville, Kentucky — the hometown of APH — to receive their award at the annual InSights Art awards celebration.

The APH Huntington 2021-2022 Speaker Series is supported in part by the Pallottine Foundation of Huntington and The James H. and Alice Teubert Charitable Trust. Learn more about APH Huntington by contacting Lee Huffman at [email protected] or 304-634-1120. Learn about APH at www.aph.org.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

Manpower Presents Art on a Limb

November 30 - January 2, 2022

Manpower Presents Art on a Limb, an exhibit of holiday trees decorated with ornaments created by regional artists, from Nov. 30, 2021, through Jan. 2, 2022, at the Huntington Museum of Art.

Although the Manpower Presents Art on a Limb exhibit will take place, Holiday Open House at HMA has been canceled this year because of COVID-19 concerns.

The Manpower Presents Art on a Limb exhibit features the work of artists in The Huntington Calligraphers’ Guild, Tri-Area Needle Arts, West Virginia Bead Society and the Western Weavers Guild of the West Virginia Basketmakers Association. The Palette Tree in HMA’s Virginia Van Zandt Great Hall features individual artist palettes featuring the artwork of dozens of regional artists, including Paula Clendenin, the late Charles Jupiter Hamilton, Lee Ann Blevins, and the late Chuck Ripper, among others.

“We are so grateful to all the artists groups and individual artists who have contributed to making this exhibit so special,” said Cindy Dearborn, HMA Education Director. “We also want to thank the volunteers who help the staff of the Huntington Museum of Art get this exhibit ready for the public to enjoy.”

You can view the Manpower Presents Art on a Limb Book here.

This exhibit is presented by Manpower.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

For thousands of years before the arrival of European explorers, indigenous civilizations developed along the banks of the Ohio River. Derived from a Senecan word, ohiːyoːh, meaning “good river,” this 981-mile-long waterway was a significant transportation and trading route, connecting far-flung settlements of prehistoric and historic cultures. Hand-carved artifacts from this ancient past continue to emerge from the fertile soil of the river valley, and mysterious earthworks dot the landscape to this day.

French colonists, who began arriving in North America in earnest during the 1600s, were the first Europeans to behold the Ohio River’s majesty. Described as La Belle Riviere or “the beautiful river,” this great river artery proved strategically important as both French and English interests fought for control of the North American interior. When the American colonies waged war for independence from Great Britain, the Ohio River Valley again became a picturesque battleground as each side raided settlements and shed blood to win the military support of the region’s native inhabitants. Its westward-flowing waters facilitated migration as European- American and African-American pioneers pushed into the Northwest Territory and beyond. While this cross-continental expansion ultimately concluded with One Nation, spanning sea to shining sea, it also precipitated the virtual erasure of this land’s native people.

From its origins at the confluence of the Allegheny and Monongahela rivers until its waters empty into the Mississippi River, major industrial cities burgeoned from colonial outposts and forts along the Ohio River’s course. The success of Pittsburgh, PA; Cincinnati, OH; Louisville, KY; Evansville, IN; and three of the five largest cities in West Virginia – Huntington, Parkersburg, and Wheeling – not to mention hundreds of smaller population centers, attests to the importance of this navigable waterway as a conduit for transporting goods, mobilizing people, and sharing ideas downstream. The Ohio River marks the southern border of Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, and thus formed part of the boundary between free states and slaveholding states before the American Civil War. Exalted as the “River Jordan” by enslaved people who crossed its waters on the dangerous journey to freedom, it is estimated that thousands escaped slavery by reaching the comparative safety of the northern banks of the Ohio River.

Using a variety of artworks and objects from the Huntington Museum of Art’s permanent collection, La Belle Riviere will evoke an appreciation for the sublime geologic beauty of one of North America’s mighty rivers, its vast watershed and many tributaries, and the deep undercurrents of history that swirl just beneath the water’s surface.

This exhibit is presented by the West Virginia Chamber of Commerce.

This program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.

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