Inuit Art & Sculpture

In the 1950s, many of the native peoples of Canada’s upper Hudson Bay area began to utilize their exceptional talents as carvers to create works of art from the soft native stone in the region. The sale of these works provided an important source of revenue for the artists, replacing some of the income that was lost as the fur trade rapidly diminished. Herman Dean, one of the founders of the Huntington Museum of Art, traveled to the area during this period and acquired a small collection of work from these artists. The works illustrate many of the aspects of Inuit life during the period, including travel, hunting, family life and the animals that lived in the region.

Inuit Art

Inuit Sculpture

Sitting Hunter

Timothy (Inuit), Sitting Hunter, n.d. Stone, 5 5/8” x 3 ½” x 6 ¼” (14.2 x 8.9 x 15.9 cm). Bequest of Mr. Mr. William C. Estler, 1982.51.7AB

Untitled

Unknown Artist (Inuit), Untitled, c. 1950. Stone, 12 ½” x 3 ¾” x 4 5/8” (31.8 x 9.5 x 11.7 cm). Bequest of Mr. William C. Estler, 1982.51.3

Untitled

Unknown Artist (Inuit), Untitled, c. 1950. Stone, 6 1/8” x 3 ½” x 4” (15.6 x 8.9 x 10.2 cm). Bequest of Mr. Herman P. Dean, 1978.2.5

Untitled

Unknown Artist (Inuit), Untitled, c. 1950. Stone and ivory, 2 ½” x 5” x 1 3/8” (6.4 x 12.7 x 3.6 cm). Bequest of Mr. Herman P. Dean, 1978.2.24A

Otter Eating Fish

Unknown Artist (Inuit), Otter Eating Fish, 20th century. Soapstone,  78 3/8” x 3 ½” x 8 ¼” (18.8 x 8.9 x 21 cm). Gift of C. F. Reuschlein Jewelers, Inc., 1972.7